NAACP Cinematic Shorts Competition

Call for Submissions

Deadline June 17, 2022, at 6:00 PM (PT.)/9:00 PM EST

CALLING ALL SOCIAL JUSTICE ACTIVISTS & FILMMAKERS!

The NAACP presents the 2022 “Cinematic Shorts Competition” during the 113th NAACP Convention in Atlantic City, NJ from July 13- July 20th.

This exciting competition will give SIX filmmakers/activists the opportunity to tell their stories of Social Justice.

Paired in teams of two, the filmmakers will receive video equipment and work under the guidance of a professional mentor to produce a 5-7 minute short documentary film.

Participating filmmakers will present their finished short films during the 113th NAACP Convention and attendees will vote for their favorite film. The team with the most votes will receive a full expense paid trip to Los Angeles to attend the 54th NAACP Image Awards. In addition, the winning filmmakers will receive one-on-one meetings with several high-level industry executives to help them take the next step in their careers.

This dynamic competition supports the ongoing work of the NAACP Hollywood Bureau and Social Justice programs within the NAACP.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

●      Must be between the ages of 18-29

●      Must submit one creative sample (video/pictures/artwork) that demonstrates your skill set and interests

●      Must submit one written statement between 250-300 words answering the following, ‘How can power be created in the black community? And why is empowering the black community important to you?’

●      Must provide your own transportation to and from Atlantic City for the competition. (Local hotel accommodations will be provided for selected filmmakers/activists based on double occupancy).

Please complete and submit this form by June 17, 2022 6 PM PST/9 PM EST

EVENT LOCATION

Atlantic City Convention Center

1 Convention Boulevard

Atlantic City, NJ 08401

Helpful Premiere Pro Shortcuts

So we all love editing, that’s why we chose this major, but sometimes we are in a hurry and need to export a video asa fast as we can. Although hanging in Axinn basement until 4AM may just be your “thing”, I want to make sure that you can get out of there quicker if it isn’t. So with that in mind here are some helpful Premiere Pro keyboard shortcuts. I’ll link a list of all possible shortcuts here, but I don’t want to overwhelm you all, so for now here are the ones I use most frequently.

CTRL+Z

Most of you have probably used this one already or have figured out that it is the same as Microsoft Word and many other programs, but I want to be safe. This may be the single most used command for me. It is an all purpose undo command that will revert all actions you have taken for up to roughly 50 actions. So if you thought you were deleting one clip and accidentally deleted multiple, do not panic. Ctrl + Z will get you out of many sticky situations.

Up/Down on the Arrow Keys

Up will take your playhead to the next cut and down will take your playhead to the previous cut. Sounds super simple, but most people don’t discover this until using Premiere Pro for a few months. It’s a great way to move through your timeline and check your work. Also just great for helping you start playing from a specific moment like the start of a scene.

Alt

If you press on its own, it moves the playhead to the start of the timeline. It’s a very simple and intuitive shortcut that is often overlooked in tutorials. Dragging your playhead through all the way back through a laggy timeline can waste a lot of time over the course of a project.

Shift Delete

If you don’t know this yet, it’s a game changer. This does what’s called a “ripple delete”. Essentially if you delete a clip that is sandwiched in-between two other clips, this command will bridge that gap and bring close the black space that you would create had you simply deleted the clip. The time I spent editing projects decreased dramatically after finding out about this command and its cousin, Ripple Trim (Ctrl+drag), which does the same thing when you shorten existing clips.

Alt + Arrow Keys

Use this when selecting a clip to move it one frame at a time. This is super handy when you want to get your audio just right in relation your footage. It also saves you from having to zoom in and painstakingly move your mouse to just the right spot.

G

Hitting “G” allows you to adjust the gain (volume) of an audio clip. It even preselects the box, so you can simply enter how many decibels you want the clip to increase/reduce by. All in all very hand for quicker editing.

CTRL + R

Allows you to adjust a clip’s speed to create an over-cranking/under-cranking effect. This saves you a good bit of time scrolling through a drop down menu or the effects tab.

There are many more shortcuts out there that I encourage you to explore, but if you are new to using Premiere Pro, this is a good start. I kid you not when I say that if you implement these commands as a beginner, you can cut down your editing time by a third. If you intend to edit for a client, a big selling point can often be the speed with which you can turn around a high quality video. I know it’s a lot to remember when all your attention is on editing, but try and time yourself when editing projects. Note the time, try to implement more shortcuts or a better workflow on the next project and see what can help you save time without compromising on quality.

Camera Operators for Water Polo Tournament

Middlebury College is the host site of the upcoming Women’s Division III National Collegiate Club Championship for Water Polo. The Collegiate Water Polo Association operates a live stream of the event, and we are looking for camera operators. 

Tournament Dates – April 30- May 1 (setup and test day April 29)

We provide all equipment including camera, tripod, zoom controller, encoder, and cables.

We are operating this as a single camera stream with a remote announcer/producer. 

Schedule – 5 games on Saturday April 30 – call time 10:30am – game times 11am, 2pm, 3:30pm, 5pm, 8pm

                 – 3 games on Sunday May 1 – call time 8:30am – game times 9am, 10:15am, 11:30pm

(each game approximately 1hr).

Pay is $25/game (check mailed after completion of event). If interested, please email: Justin Cypert – video@collegiatewaterpolo.org

Creativity and Innovation Associate

132 Blinn Lane, Middlebury, Vermont 05753, United States

About the role

Application deadline: May 15, 2022 5:00 PM

Posted date: March 18, 2022

Seasonal role: (7/1/22 – 7/15/23)

US work authorization: Accepts OPT/CPT

Role Description

The Innovation Hub is hiring a Creativity & Innovation Associate for a 1-2 year term. The Creativity & Innovation Associate is charged with providing operational and technical support for the implementation of programs and outreach efforts to support campus activities related to creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship. They will manage several student-run initiatives and programs as well as perform administrative tasks for general Innovation Hub programming. This position reports to the Director of the Innovation Hub.
The primary function of the C&I Associate is to work with the Director of Programs to manage the Creativity & Innovation program suite at the Hub and advise affiliated student groups: MiddChallenge, Middlebury Entrepreneurs, Old Stone Mill, Vermont Innovation Summer, Tree House Fund, MiddSTART, New Millennium Fund, the Hunt, TEDxMiddlebury, Midd Ventures Community, and Vermont Ventures Trips. The C&I Associate also works to facilitate collaboration across program suites at the Hub and between the Experiential Learning Centers at Middlebury.
Responsibilities

  • Develop, implement and support programs to inform and inspire creativity and innovation at Middlebury. Verify and report the effectiveness of these programs. 
  • Support, coordinate, train and motivate students to build successful creativity and innovation initiatives through advising, the facilitation of grant programs, and event support. 
  • Serve as the first-point of contact for advising at the Innovation Hub; channel interested students to relevant programs both inside and outside of your domain.
  • Maintain relations with partner/community organizations, internship employers, and affiliated students by attending program site visits and external events (such as job fairs and speaker events). Lead student groups on trips to events and employer visits.
  • Compile Innovation Hub newsletter, social media, communications and outreach projects. Maintain the website, including blog and media updates, and write copy and other documentation for distribution to internal and external audiences.
  • Conduct outreach on campus and beyond through tabling, webinars, and individual advising with current students, prospective students, alumni, and community partners
  • Collect and compile stories about the efforts of Middlebury students, faculty and staff that demonstrate leadership and learning about creativity and innovation through writing, photos, videos, and/or web content. 
  • Lead student tracking efforts and organization in order to report on office reach and program effectiveness.
  • Serve as a conduit for communication between students, faculty, staff, parents, alumni, and Middlebury community members. 
  • Serve as the administrative liaison for Middlebury’s partnership with local and state entrepreneurial organizations like VCET, Hula, LaunchVT, Fresh Tracks, internship employers, and economic development organizations. 
  • Support the management of annual budgets that mirror program needs, vouchers and reimbursements. 
  • Direct supervision of undergraduate interns.

Qualifications
Required

  • Strong organizational and professional communication skills.
  • Ability to take ownership of several simultaneous projects, set priorities, and work in an unstructured environment.
  • Willingness to live locally and work on in-person campus at the Innovation Hub office. There is hybrid/remote flexibility as needed, but the majority of the work will be in-person.
  • Ability to advise students and execute programming in a manner that considers issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, and ethical decision-making.

Preferred

  • Familiar with Google Drive, Microsoft Office, Slack, and Zoom.
  • Social media and/or graphic design experience with your tool of choice is a plus.
  • Recent experience in higher education or familiarity with Middlebury College’s co-curricular ecosystem.
  • Experience in an advisory role is a plus.

Offer is contingent upon successful completion of a criminal background check.Covid-19 vaccination is a condition of employment. For more information: https://www.middlebury.edu/office/covid-19-updates/covid-19-vaccine-requirements
We welcome people of all backgrounds to apply. All applicants will be considered for employment without attention to race, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, veteran or disability status.

Apply Here

Social Innovation Associate

132 Blinn Lane, Middlebury, Vermont 05753, United States

About the role

Application deadline: May 1, 2022 5:00 PM

Posted date: March 21, 2022

Seasonal role: (5/1/22 – 7/14/23)

Estimated salary: $15.68 Per hour

US work authorization: Accepts OPT/CPT

Role Description

The Innovation Hub is hiring a Social Innovation Associate for a 1-2 year term beginning Summer 2022. The Social Innovation Associate is charged with providing operational and technical support for the implementation of programs and outreach efforts to support social innovation at Middlebury. The Associate will be responsible for communicating the Innovation Hub’s initiatives and success stories of individuals and groups to internal and external audiences. They will also perform administrative tasks for the Innovation Hub’s overall programs. This position reports to the Director of the Innovation Hub.
Responsibilities

  • Develop, implement and support programs to inform and inspire social innovation at Middlebury. Assess and report the effectiveness of these programs.
  • Support, coordinate, train and motivate students to build successful social innovation initiatives through advising, the implementation and facilitation of the grants program, the fellowship program, Projects for Peace.
  • Support, coordinate, and implement exposure to social innovation through internships, Vermont Innovation Summer program, mentor/speaker events, and workshops (including, but not limited to cross-cultural communication, ethical decision-making, budgeting, pre-departure). Assist in the design and implementation of global health experiential opportunities.
  • Serve as an ambassador for the social innovation programs to current students, prospective students, parents, faculty and staff, alumni, community members, and community partners. Serve as a conduit for communication between these groups, including through the maintenance of Midd2Midd and tracking.
  • Produce and direct multimedia stories about the efforts of Middlebury students, faculty and staff that demonstrate leadership and learning about social innovation.
  • Support the management of annual budgets that mirror program needs, payments and reimbursements.
  • Compile Innovation Hub newsletter, social media, communications and outreach projects. Maintain the website, including blog and media updates, and write copy and other documentation for distribution to internal and external audiences.
  • Supports relationships with Clinton Global Initiative University, Ashoka, and other university networks.
  • Direct supervision of undergraduate interns.
  • Serve as a liaison between Innovation Hub and Center for Community Engagement, Center for Careers and Internships, Environmental Affairs, and other campus partners to streamline programming.
  • Support, as needed, the other programs that fall under the Innovation Hub.

Qualifications
Required

  • Strong organizational and professional communication skills.
  • Ability to take ownership of several simultaneous projects, set priorities, and work in an unstructured environment.
  • Willingness to live locally and work on in-person campus at the Innovation Hub office. There is hybrid/remote flexibility as needed, but the majority of the work will be in-person.
  • Ability to advise students and execute programming in a manner that considers issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, and ethical decision-making.

Preferred

  • Familiar with Google Drive, Microsoft Office, Slack, and Zoom.
  • Social media and/or graphic design experience with your tool of choice is a plus.
  • Recent experience in higher education or familiarity with Middlebury College’s co-curricular ecosystem.
  • Experience in an advisory role is a plus.

Offer is contingent upon successful completion of a criminal background check.

We welcome people of all backgrounds to apply. All applicants will be considered for employment without attention to race, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, veteran or disability status.

Apply Here

NFT (???)

After months of vigilant observation from behind the corner, laughing and ridiculing, ruminating while anxiously walking around the room, waking up all covered in sweat, crying, and veiling, I have finally decided to look into the hottest (and probably most controversial) phenomenon in the digital art market, ***NFTs***.

As I begin to compose this entry I have no idea what NFTs are and how they function. Nonetheless, I will try not to get astray in the forest of technicalities, labyrinths of art theory, or mazes of the art dealership.

So let’s begin! First of all, what is an NFT? No, I mean, what does that word even mean? As you could have already figured out NFT is an acronym that stands for Non-Fungible Token. ‘Non-Fungible’ is practically used to describe something one of the kind, unique and irreproducible. 

The history of NFTs has begun around the year 2014. Since then the digital phenomenon has gained immense notoriety. So let’s go way back and try to figure out what NFTs actually are. We are used to thinking about NFTs as images, however, that is not always true. An NFT can take shape of a song, a video, and practically any form of media that can be digitized (even Tweets that were sold by the founder of Twitter as NFTs for hundreds of thousands of dollars).

In this regard, NFTs are like trading collectible cards: there are many individual cards, but each one is unique and nonidentical. Initially, it seems confusing. How on Earth can NFTs be unique if anyone can right-click and save any piece of media on the Internet, and if that doesn’t work, you can always just screenshot an image or record a piece of music with your phone? That is true. However, NFTs are not just unique images or songs, they come with rights for a piece of media that belongs uniquely to the buyer. A good analogy would be owning the original work of Matisse, and not just a print (there is probably one decorating your college dorm but that does not mean, you own any works by Matisse from the Louvre).

In reality, NFTs are similar to cryptocurrencies like bitcoin or dogecoin which are additionally linked to a token with a blockchain. Initially, NFTs were launched by Etherium, however, now many other blockchains also offer NFTs. So when one decides to purchase an NFT, the blockchain registers the transaction and stores it, legitimizing the buyer’s ownership. 

Since the future of NFTs is highly uncertain, no one can really tell what is going to happen to the pieces acquired by Internet buyers. Leading experts in the field of blockchains and cryptocurrencies recommend being careful with investing in NFTs. Whilst it presents an alluring prospect of potentially successful investment, no one can guarantee that it will pay off in the future. Potential buyers should also consider that just like tangible artworks, digital media deteriorates with time: the quality of images drops, old formats stop being supported, and files get corrupted.

Meanwhile, for artists, NFTs presents an amazing way to monetize their art that would, otherwise, have a pretty limited market. The miracle of NFTs is that artists can avoid galleries and agents selling their arts. Many even say that NFTs constitute the new way of collecting art. 

After this brief but, hopefully, accessible explanation of what NFTs are and how they actually work, I would want to present to you a small gallery of the most notoriously known NFTs (isn’t it ironic that I can just freely put it on here even though someone spent thousands upon thousands of dollars on these images previously?):

  1. CROSSROAD by beeple

2. CryptoPunk #7804

3. Everydays: the First 5000 Days by beeple

Is it about the time to buy or sell your first NFT? (don’t forget that they are taxable)

Films That Made Me Think Critically About My Cinematography

I’ve somewhat accepted that at this point, I will do just about every one of these entries as a David Letterman-style list. It helps to give my writing structure and it seems as if more people are willing to read something in this style. So for this week’s installment of FMMC Buzzfeed, I’d like to talk about some movies that helped me to get inspired behind the camera. This is not a list of the best shot films, but it is a list of ones that I think the average person can find enjoyable while also noticing and appreciating their cinematic uniqueness. I’ve managed to tame my inner snob and have avoided adding films like Stalker and 8 1/12. I would still recommend them, but I want to keep this list accessible to a wider audience. I’ve chosen these films for a variety of different reasons, but the one connecting thread is that they have accomplished something unique behind the camera that I have wanted to emulate in my own filmmaking.

Waves (2019) DP: Drew Daniels

For starters this is basically two films in terms of style. In the first half, the cinematography is extremely kinetic. The camera literally does not stop moving until a tragic turning point in the story. After an hour of that whirlwind style, the emotional blow of the story’s midpoint hits you as an audience member. I felt my heat drop when I first saw the film in theaters. The second half is much more traditional in terms of cinematography, but retains some of the slight graceful movements of the first half. Almost as if a depression has blanketed across the characters and the camera itself, making it harder for them to move as freely. There are a great many documentaries, skate films, and high-octane action films with a similar amount of movement, but never this controlled. The handful of slight shakey-cam accents are extremely intentional. I am frankly still unaware of how a film can contain this much movement without feeling like an amusement park ride. Speaking of which…

City of God (2002) DP: César Charlone

City of God feels like a fly on the wall style documentary in so many ways. The staging is done so impeccably that you feel as if you might not witness what’s in the next shot. The characters do not feel bound by the frame at all and yet everything is still captured. The effect of this shooting style is an extremely raw and emotionally charged atmosphere that imbues the plot with so much more of an emotional punch.

Mid90s (2018) DP: Chris Blauvelt

When it comes to capturing the atmosphere of an era, look no further than Mid90s. The set decoration and wardrobe are doing some heavy lifting, but it is the cinematography that makes you feel as if you are watching a product of the 1990s. The choice to shoot on 16mm with a relatively high ISO made the film feel like a prolonged skate flick. Other hallmarks of skater films from that era like fish-eye lenses, and the lesser used 1.37:1 aspect ratio make the final product ooze cultural ambience.

Portrait of a Woman on Fire (2019) DP: Claire Mathon

Ok, so I know I said I would avoid pretentious films, but I just couldn’t help myself on this one. It may not be the most exhilarating film, but it will still easily keep viewers attention, which is strange because it breaks from so many modern conventions. The norm nowadays is snappy dialogue and quick cuts, but Portrait of a Woman on Fire intentionally avoids that altogether. The dialogue alone doesn’t even tell a complete story of the complex relationship that emerges between the two leads. Portrait of a Woman on Fire is a prime example of a visually driven story. So much character development and plot comes from the shots. I would like to say more, but I’m afraid to give away what makes this film so special.

There Will Be Blood (2007) DP: Robert Elswit

I could really go on here, but to put it simply, this is a film without a wasted shot. Every shot here aids in developing a character, progressing the story, or both. It’s all so painfully intentional and methodically planned that it would be hard to recreate if given all the time in the world.

Her (2013) DP: Hoyte van Hoytema

Oftentimes when people think of cinematographic styles they gravitate towards something like Wes Anderson and Robert Yeoman’s iconic look. This is all well and good, but most style in cinematography is far more subtle. Additionally, I’m of the opinion that your style should add to the story. When styles like Yeoman’s are on display, I find myself extremely distracted by the spectacle of this look and less involved in the story. Her, stands out to me in this way. Its style so thoroughly compliments the story that the two feel inseparable. The way Joaquin Phoenix sits in the frame is so out of place. Hoytema uses depth of field artfully to emphasize the separation between Phoenix’s character and the rest of the world. Furthermore the color palette, lenses, camera, exposure, and color correction all blend in a mesmerizing way. The end product is visual poetry.

Hero (2002) DP: Christopher Doyle

I could go on with this list for an annoying amount of time, but for now I would like to leave you with the film that first opened my eyes to the art of filmmaking. Hero has every right to be an over-the-top action film with zero imagination behind its camerawork. It could’ve made a lot of money doing just that. But instead, it is a truly innovative masterpiece. In the film, few trusted individuals are allowed within 100-paces of the Chinese emperor. Therefore, spacial relations are played with in a number of unique ways to denote trust, status, importance, etc. The film also utilizes a unique form of storytelling that sees the colors black, white, red, green, and blue used to represent the subjective perspectives of individual characters who witnessed the same events. The transitions between these perspectives/colors is masterful and a delight to watch.

Trinity Film Festival

Trinity Film Festival (TFF) is an international undergraduate film competition held annually on the campus of Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Every year, some of the most talented student filmmakers in the country and around the globe submit short films for the chance to screen on our historic big screen. This year will be a hybrid virtual experience, and you are invited to apply. Students from Middlebury College have won awards at Trinity Film Festival in the past!

Trinity Film Festival is accepting submissions at trinfilmfestival.org. Films of any genre are eligible as long as they are under 10 minutes in length. Each year, winning films are eligible for cash prizes. The deadline has been extended to April 20th. 

Websites for FMMC Majors

Filmmaking and getting acquainted with film can be intimidating in a variety of different ways, but luckily we now have the internet to answer the questions we’re too afraid to ask. I’ve compiled a short list of websites that I have used over the years that have helped me in one way or the other helped me better my understanding of filmmaking. There’s a wide range of sites here, so even if you are not much of a shooter, there are still numerous resources for you.

Vimeo

Alright, you definitely know this one, but if you haven’t created an account already, I would highly recommend doing so. If you are a filmmaker, this is the cheapest way to allow future employers or clients to view your work in a high quality. And even if you aren’t a shooter, there is a wide array of films here for your viewing pleasure. Check out “Staff Picks” tab to discover what has been catching people’s attention recently. Some films on here tend to straddle that line between amateur and professional, making it interesting to see what other filmmakers are achieving with limited resources.

No Film School

The premise is in the title, this website should give you enough information so that you will need “no film school”. The articles here are range on everything from equipment reviews to film history essays. If you are at all interested in film, there is something here for you. The tone and style of these articles also tends to be much more digestible and friendly towards beginners. I was intimidated by film theory for some time because of the dense academic language, but articles on this website helped me get a better grasp of the subject matter.

Letterboxd

Letterboxd is an open source film/TV review site and tracker that helps viewers catalog the media they’ve watched. This allows you to track what movies you have seen, create lists of similar movies, and leave reviews. These reviews are all available to other users. This means that you can search for others lists, so if you are looking for movies similar to a niche title or want movies in a sub-genre that isn’t easily google-able, then you will likely find something on Letterboxd. Users can also leave ratings on a five star scale, and all scores are compiled from users for each film. I enjoy these ratings because Letterboxd users tend to be film geeks, but not as pretentious as critics. Oftentimes if there is a large discrepancy between a critic score and an audience score on Rotten Tomatoes, I check Letterboxd for clarity. If the score is high, it’s likely an under appreciated gem, but if not then it is likely something critics are hyping up.

FilmFreeway

If you want to submit any of your work to a festival, this is pretty much your one stop shop. Festivals as big as Sundance and as small as new regional fests use FilmFreeway to collect submissions. If you are considering submitting work in the future, you might want to create your account now to save yourself some time.

Free Sound

Free Sound is an open source and free to use database for sound effects. If you want to heighten your film’s overall production value by adding in authentic sound effects, this is a good place to begin your search. The site has numerous regular contributors with varying levels of experience in audio production, so there is some variation in quality. However, with a little effort, you can find some real gems that will help bring your film to life. Most importantly, all sounds here are in the public domain without attribution, making it very attractive for films without much of a budget.

Keh.com

Keh.com is a used camera exchange where amateur and professional videographers sell their used gear at discounted prices. This is the most widely used of a genre of websites. If you search “video gear exchange website” you will find many just like it. If you are looking to beef up your personal equipment to work on your own productions during the summer or after college, this is a good place to hunt for affordable gear.