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Academic Roundtable, March 10, 2015 – Managing Technology in the Classroom

Categories: Midd Blogosphere
The Academic Roundtable meets on Tuesdays in the lounge of the CTLR from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.
As the number and type of devices students bring to class has proliferated, faculty have had to wrestle with how to manage this new reality of students showing up with phones, tablets, and laptops. In addition, students are impacted by their fellow students. In this session, we’ll hear from faculty who are wrestling with this challenge, as well as from students whose views represent a range of positions.

Faculty discussing their classroom technology policies and practices will include:
Alison Stanger, Political Science
Helen Young, Biology
Student panelists include:
Phil Bohlman ’17
Cate Costley ’15
David Ollin Pesqueira ’17
William Weightman ’17
You may wish to read Clay Shirky’s ” Why I Just Asked My Students To Put Their Laptops Away” at

Interested in an international career in human rights, social justice, and poverty alleviation? Come have a chat with the new MIIS Dean of the Graduate School of International Policy and Management!!

Categories: Midd Blogosphere
   About the Dean:  Associate Professor Kent Glenzer was appointed dean of the Graduate School of International Policy and Management in January 2015. Glenzer serves as the academic leader overseeing the school’s degree programs in Business Administration (MBA), International Education Management, International Environmental Policy, International Policy and Development, Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies, and Public Administration […]

New summer internship opportunities to join in a grassroots campaign on economic justice for Vermont farmers with Rural Vermont!!

Categories: Midd Blogosphere
For the past 30 years Rural Vermont has worked to create economic justice for Vermont farmers through education, grassroots organizing and advocacy for the past 30 years. Join their team and help fulfill their vision for a community- based food system which sustains our farmers, our communities, and our lands. The two summer internship opportunities, […]

HR Update: This Week’s Employment Snapshot

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

There are currently 19 faculty positions, 47 external job postings (regular, on-call and temporary), and 3 internal job postings on the Middlebury College employment opportunities web sites.

Employment Quick Links:

Faculty Employment Opportunities: http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/administration/prospective_faculty/employment

Staff Employment Opportunities: go/staff-jobs (on campus), http://go.middlebury.edu/staff-jobs (off campus)

Please note – to view only internal staff postings, please use the internal posting search filter that was highlighted in this MiddPoints article.

On-call/Temporary Staff Employment Opportunities: go/staff-jobs-sh (on campus), http://go.middlebury.edu/staff-jobs-sh (off campus)

Workshop Offering: Human Relations Skills – The Dale Carnegie Course

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

 “Investing in yourself,” Warren Buffet said in an interview on CBS, “is the BEST investment you can make.  I invested in a Dale Carnegie® program years ago and it wasworth a college degree.”

You will be able to:

  • Create a Professional Vision
  • Set and Achieve Your  Goals  
  • Present Your Ideas with Clarity 
  • Enhance Your Leadership Skills
  • Coach and Motivate for Success   
  • Stay Positive in Critical Situations
  • Build Trust and Integrity with Others  
  • Build Relationships across the Organization 

This course qualifies for the Middlebury Continuing Education Benefit*:

If you would like to receive funding to attend:

  1. Please first click here to get more information about the program from Dale Carnegie or register or contact Agnes Cook at agnes_cook@dalecarnegie.com
  2. Then click here to complete and submit a Middlebury Continuing Education Fund Application.
  3. Please also discuss with this your supervisor to get the appropriate approval to attend (if questions arise regarding this please contact Sheila Cameron at scameron@middlebury.edu)

*This Dale Carnegie course is accredited and offers 2.8 CEU’s (Continuing Education Units) and is supported by the Continuing Education Fund Benefit. Participants are required to participate in at least 7 out of the 8 classes to receive CEU credits. Make up classes for all sessions are available in the Dale Carnegie Essex, VT location.

WHEN: Tuesdays, Mar. 17- May 5, 2015 8:30 AM to Noon (8 sessions)

WHERE: 51 Main Street Middlebury, VT

Register by March 6th please

Snowy Saturday Shuffle to Sugar Hill

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Finally, on Saturday, the howling cold weather which has kept me indoors far more than I would like gave us a reprieve.  Saturday’s mid-teen temperatures, which under normal circumstances would still be a bit on the cold side felt absolutely balmy, so I went for a ski in the morning at the Snow Bowl.  Some errands I had to do limited me to a half day, but by mid-afternoon I had completed them, so I decided to turn my ski day into the best of both worlds, and loaded my cross-country skis into the back of my Beetle, and headed out for round 2 of the day’s fun.  I set off for the Ripton-Goshen Road, not really sure where exactly I would end up skiing as the afternoon’s snow started, and then increased in intensity.  I was not in the mood to break trail, so I was looking for places where others had skied, snowshoed, or snowmobiled, but was looking for something a little less well groomed than the terrain offered by our local ski touring centers.

My first thought was to ski down the forest service road leading east  to the Moosalamoo Campground and Voter Brook Overlook, but the ski track I found petered out in about a half mile, turning into a snowshoe track set by hikers intent on climbing Mt Moosalamoo, which would have required more time than I had at my disposal.  So, I returned to my car, and looked for another entry into the forest.  Heading south another mile or two, I came to a plowed turn off for the forest service road which heads up to one of my favorite backcountry sites, the Sugar Hill Reservoir.  I didn’t make note of how exactly this is marked, but it is on your left as you head south, and is about a mile north of the Blueberry Hill Inn.  I headed up this road, which is used by the cars of fishermen who use it to access the reservoir during the summer.  I knew from past explorations that this road is heavily traveled and maintained for snowmobile travel in the winter.  I also knew that this point of entry would bring me to the lesser-used northernmost nordic trails associated with the Blueberry Hill Inn’s Nordic Center.  The ravages of Hurricane Irene took out a few bridges on this part of the trail network, and the funds have not yet been raised to revive them (although a funding campaign has been launched!), so I suspected that these trails would be skier-packed, but not groomed.  While recent transplants to the area may not know this, older skiers (like me!) will probably remember that through much of the 70’s through the early 90’s (If anyone knows the full span of this, feel free to comment), Blueberry Hill sponsored the American Ski Marathon, which was part of the national ski marathon series known as the Great American Ski Chase.  As a result this race, which galvanized the support of almost all the inhabitants of tiny Goshen, VT, brought in some of the finest ski racers from all over the country, and even a few random local college professors.  My ski today covered a small segment of this race course.

I headed up the hill towards the reservoir, not really remembering how far I had to go.  I realized that this would be a pretty short ski if this was my sole destination, as I reached the height of land above the reservoir only after 3/4 of a mile, and hit the reservoir shores after only a mile.  The snow was starting to fall pretty heavily at this point, but there in front of me was the snow-covered lake, and I realized that I had, there in front of me, an opportunity to write my name, or at least my initials, in the snow on a scale which might be visible from space, or at least by our spy satellites.  Perhaps a “JB” a quarter mile high, with a superscript afterwards to show off my science side? While I considered this, I also realized that if I was going to put the effort in to do this, I wanted a picture, and the heavy snow and increasingly late afternoon lighting precluded meaningful photography of any such attempts to defile the scenery.

Sugar Hill Reservoir

 

 

I also noticed the sign, describing this reservoir as the geographic high point of the hydroelectric project culminating at Lake Dunmore. This sign, by the way, is usually at eye level. We have a lot of snow!

Sign at Sugar Hill Reservoir

Sign at Sugar Hill Reservoir

I began my descent, but wanted to extend my ski, even as the light was fading, so I took a left turn about halfway back, heading into the Blueberry Hill trails on what is known as the Sucker Brook Trail, which had been packed by the skis of a few others who had preceded me. This section of skiing, continued with a sharp right turn and short climb on the Stewart Trail (none of these names are marked, by the way – I just know them from past experiences – they are labelled by signs bearing numbers, relevant to the ski touring area’s map) took me into denser hardwood forest. Big old trees make lots of loud cracking sounds when it is cold outside, and by this point the temperature was dropping. Eventually I reached a point where I realized that I would soon be descending into the touring center, and I didn’t want to have to do the extra climb to extricate myself, probably in the dark, so I turned around and headed back to my car. En route, I passed a sign with the number 7 written on it. Lucky? Not really – this was a 7 Km marker from another of Blueberry Hill’s races, the summer Goshen Gallop trail run.

 

7 km sign

7 km sign

Reaching the forest service road, I took a left turn and descended to my now snow-covered Beetle. This ended up as a pretty easy and short ski tour. The short climb to the reservoir is particularly nice for less experienced skiers. I ended up putting in about 4 miles on this, with no more than 200 ft of climbing at any point. I can also see that we are going to have some impressive spring skiing this year!

Google Earth of the Ski

Google Earth of the Ski

Altitude profile

Choose Love over Fear

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Today and every day, choose love over fear until it becomes your habit. Wayne Dyerdownload

Today I reminded myself of the time I was freer when I could Love without fear and find strength in vulnerability. In the past months I had grown fearful of hurting others and being hurt which naturally limited my ability to give my love without holding back and looking for reciprocity. It stopped me from being direct and honest to the degree I wanted to. (But if we are, indeed, destined to live our own separate realities, isn’t the only way to bridge the inherent gap between each other precisely direct, honest communication?!)
Ironically, I had put myself and others through a lot of pain simply by trying not to cause pain.
Back then when I lived life to its fullest intensity, I accepted pain as a normal part on the path of learning.
I have been hurt and I have, certainly, hurt others. But may be we shouldn’t villainize pain and strive to escape it.
One thing I had embraced before and forgotten recently is that pain and being hurt is a catalyst of change and transformation.
Being afraid of hurting others or being hurt petrifies us and leaves little space for the good stuff in life- like Love and Empathy. If we accept the possibility of occasionally getting hurt or hurting others (without it being intentional, of course!) as an inevitable part of life that we can nevertheless celebrate, we may find that in the end fear isn’t really worth it and that guardedness is much more dangerous than vulnerability.