Here in Vermont, It’s All Bernie, All the Time

Categories: Midd Blogosphere
Bernia mania has struck Vermont! Can the rest of the U.S.  be far behind? Vermont’s latest presidential hopeful is slated to kick off his presidential campaign in 15  minutes, and we will be right there (virtually, not literally) with Bernie, live blogging the event.  The kickoff event is taking place at Waterfront Park in Burlington, […]

HR Update: This Week’s Employment Snapshot

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

There are currently 3 faculty positions, 53 external job postings (regular, on-call and temporary), and 4 internal job postings on the Middlebury College employment opportunities web sites.

Employment Quick Links:

Faculty Employment Opportunities:http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/administration/prospective_faculty/employment

Staff Employment Opportunities: go/staff-jobs (on campus),http://go.middlebury.edu/staff-jobs (off campus)

Please note – to view only internal staff postings, please use the internal posting search filter that was highlighted in this MiddPoints article.

On-call/Temporary Staff Employment Opportunities: go/staff-jobs-sh (on campus), http://go.middlebury.edu/staff-jobs-sh (off campus)

Invitation: FIS Host Program Summer Informational Meetings

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Invitation: FIS Host Program Summer Informational Meetings
You’re invited to learn more about the Friends of International Students (FIS) Host Program
at one of our upcoming information meetings.

Dear Faculty and Staff–
International Student & Scholar Services invites you to learn more about our Friends of International Students host program.
• The program provides a terrific opportunity for you to meet people from around the world, and to connect with a student in an individual way.
• It’s a friendship program. Contacts between student and family are arranged on your own terms.
• To date, the Class of 2019 will include more than 70 international students, including some U.S. students who live abroad.
• In September, we also will welcome over 12 international exchange students.
• Most of the students participate in our program, so we will need many new hosts.
We will offer several information sessions throughout the summer.
If you are interested in exploring the possibility of serving as a host to an international student, please register to attend one of our information meetings in the Service Building, Second Floor, Room 200.
• Tuesday, June 16, 12:15-1:00 p.m.
• Wednesday, June 24, 5:15-6:00 p.m.
• Wednesday, July 15, 12:15-1:00 p.m.
• Wednesday, August 12, 12:15-1:00 p.m.
• Thursday, August 20, 5:15-6:00 p.m.

Please feel free to bring your lunch to our afternoon meetings.
We hope you will be able to join us. However, if you cannot attend a session and are interested in the program, please let us know.
TO REGISTER: Please contact Carolyn Dahm, ISSS Administrative Coordinator, by email at isss@middlebury.edu or by telephone at 443-5858. (Your email reply will go directly to the ISSS office mailbox. In either your email or phone message, please provide your name, email address, and phone number.) Even if you have been a host in the past, please contact us to register for a meeting, both to share your experiences with potential hosts and to learn about the upcoming year of the FIS program!
Please share this information with friends and family who do not work at the College.
We invite all who are interested in learning more about the program to attend a meeting.
To learn more about the Friends of International Students (FIS) Host Program, please visit our website at: http://www.middlebury.edu/international/isss/fis .

Weekly Web Updates – May 25, 2015

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

New Features

New Documentation

Our colleagues at MIIS have put together a really nice quick-start guide to editing their Drupal site, including some fun video tutorials. While some of this is specific to the MIIS site, much of it also applies to the Middlebury Drupal site. We’ll be “borrowing” some of this content to improve our documentation.

Updates

Tweaks and Fixes

  • The site for the MIIS Center for Social Impact Learning has been redesigned to fit in with the rest of the MIIS site and the header features a custom wordmark logo for the program.
  • The MIIS website now has the canonical name of the organization in the site header using JSON-LD microdata format to let search engines know which name to use when displaying links to the site on search results pages. This is something we’ll be rolling out to the Middlebury Drupal sites shortly as well.
  • News stories on the MIIS site use a new set of custom designed social media icons, which will also soon appear in the site footer. Additionally, moving your mouse over the email icon no longer automatically opens a pop-up, you have to manually click on the icon.
  • The Middlebury wordmark in MiddMedia‘s height and width have been adjusted to support the new identity graphic.
  • We’ve added support for embedding Salesforce Pardot forms from learn.middlebury.edu on the Drupal sites using the new [iframe URL] shortcode.

Return to Abbey Pond

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

One of my posts, almost 5 years ago, involved a run up the Abbey Pond Trail.  Much to my surprise, this has proven to be the most frequently accessed post on this blog, speaking to the popularity of the Abbey Pond Trail.  This trail, the closest and most convenient trailhead leading into the National Forest for Middlebury runners and hikers, was one I had always wanted to explore, but hadn’t gotten to in my then roughly 25 years living in this community.  After running it, I found that it was a more challenging run than I expected, and that there were some sections where the footing was too much “rock hopping” and not enough trail to maintain any sort of running pace.  It was also a very pretty trail.  I had heard that in the last few years, some trail maintenance had been performed, and thought I would check it out on a beautiful, warm Sunday afternoon, shortly after the college graduation.

To access the trailhead, head east from town on Quarry Road, and take a left, north, on Rt 116.  In less than a mile, a trailhead sign leading onto a dirt road will be on your right, and take this turn, following trailhead signs for about a half mile to the small parking lot at the end of the road.  From this point, the trail is very easy to follow, and well marked all the way to its conclusion at the pond.  The trail starts out pretty easily, going from flat to modest incline until you cross a bridge, leading over a brook, where the outlet stream from Abbey Pond, far uphill at this point, cascades down a steep defile in the rocks, creating a waterfall both above and below the bridge.

Abbey Pond Trail Waterfall

Abbey Pond Trail Waterfall

 

Continuing past the waterfall on increasingly steep trail, I noticed a steep embankment to my left, and I did a quick scramble up this to see where it led. I should not have been surprised to see that it brought me to the brink of one of the many gravel pits operated by the Carrara Concrete Company up against the west face of the Green Mt escarpment in Addison County. I have always assumed that the sandy soil of this geography, atypical for Addison County which is largely clay, was the result of its being the former beachfront property on Lake Champlain as its waters receded following the last ice age, although I have not confirmed this with my Geology Dept. colleagues.  One thing about this vista had me scratching my head however – I can’t for the life of me figure out why they would park a few old school buses in their gravel pit!

Gravel Pit View

Gravel Pit View

 

After this point, the trail veers more aggressively uphill, first on the north side of the stream, then crossing over to the south side. When I described this portion of the trail a few years back, I confessed that I had to take a breather, and slow down to a walk for a while due to its relentless climb. This time around, I didn’t find that necessary, so I guess I am a stronger runner, and I know I have lost about 20 pounds since then, making the hills even easier. Isaac Newton was right – F = ma.

After the steep section of the climb, the rumored trail improvements came to sight.  My memory of this section was of a lot of rock hopping on a badly eroded trail, where I had the sneaky suspicion that the water flowing between the rocks was part of the stream beginning at the outlet of the lake.  Even though it was pretty close to flat, the footing was really to precarious to do anything resembling running.  Now, the trail has been re-routed off to the side on slightly higher ground and for the time being at least is very nice single-track running.  Looking into the origins of the new section of trail, I discovered something about its history.  During the summer of 2013 the local section of the Green Mountain Club performed this badly needed maintenance in memory of a father and son, David and Levi Duclos, who passed away prematurely in 2004 and 2012, respectively.  Both of them passed away while enjoying the outdoors.

After about a mile of pretty flat terrain on the recently re-routed trail, I got to the shores of this modest little pond in the mountains.  The peak in the background here is Robert Frost Mountain, the subject of another of my postings.  Several years ago, I came across an older map which showed a trail connection between Abbey Pond and the trails leading up to Robert Frost Mountain, so I explored around the lakeshore to see if I could discern any trails beyond the pond, but within a few hundred yards, the modest herd path diminished and disappeared into the swamps, and I was not wearing attire appropriate for bushwhacking.  It was also getting late in the afternoon, and I suspected that the evening insect attack would begin soon, so I took a picture of the pond from a less commonly viewed perspective, and backtracked to the maintained trail.

Abbey Pond and swamp

Abbey Pond and swamp

There were a few small tufts of various wildflowers alongside the shores as well, and I spied one that I had never noticed before – it had rather large hanging bulbs about an inch across, and I am including a picture in case someone could identify them for me.

Mystery Wildflowers

Mystery Wildflowers

Returning to my car was far easier, as is almost always the case. The run covered about 4 and a half miles, with an ascent and descent of about 1000 vertical feet. Five years ago, I rated this path “pretty for hiking, not really very good for running” but with the trail improvements of a few years ago it has become much more runable. I suspect I will be running it more often in the future, due to it’s convenience to town, and the fact that I suspect that it will be a cool place to run on hot mid-summer afternoons due to the fact that the most challenging part of the climb is in a shady defile in the mountains, cooled by the adjacent stream.

Altitude Profile of Abbey Pond

Altitude Profile of Abbey Pond

Google Earth projection of Abbey Pond Trail

Google Earth projection of Abbey Pond Trail

Love in Action 2015-05-24 13:34:24

Categories: Midd Blogosphere


The Week’s Headlines

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Here are the week’s headlines from the News Room:

New Middlebury Bread Loaf Conferences Offer Lectures and Readings to the Public

College Grants Tenure to Three Faculty Members

Middlebury Institute at Monterey Confers Graduate Degrees to 255 Students from 27 Countries

Students Earn Fellowships, Scholarships, Awards

Quoted this Week: Jason Mittell on TV Storytelling

Julia Alvarez ’71 to Deliver Middlebury College Commencement Address

View past stories by visiting the News Room page.