Global Health Opportunities for Midd Grads

Nancy Fullman '07
Nancy Fullman ’07

Thanks to Nancy Fullman ’07, Middlebury College has a curated list of entry-level and early career positions in global health. Every few weeks Nancy emails our office with job opportunities to share with you!

Nancy received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Middlebury College in 2007 and went on to become a Post-Bachelor Fellow at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) from 2008 to 2011. She received her Master of Public Health in Health Metrics and Evaluation from the University of Washington in 2011. Nancy is now IHME’s Scientific Advisor and we are lucky to have her in our network! You can read more about Nancy on the IHME website.

Below are entry-level and early career global health positions Nancy has curated have over the last few weeks; note they are far from comprehensive, but it’s a sampling of what she could easily find and/or organizations she knows and respects. She’s highlighted current opportunities at IHME in yellow, as she is able to provide a bit more information about those particular positions.

This week’s list of opportunities can be downloaded here.

Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Internship Program

Recent grads and/or super senior Febs looking for a Fall or Spring internship? Use your STEM skills to help shape policy in the nation’s capital! Apply for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy internship program:

Serving as an OSTP Intern provides a unique opportunity to work closely with senior White House officials and science and technology (S&T) policy analysts in OSTP’s policy division (Policy internship) or on OSTP’s legal team (Legal internship).

Applicants are encouraged to apply for one of three terms (Fall, Spring, or Summer), each term lasting no more than 90 days.

Policy Internships
OSTP supports and coordinates the Administration’s Science and Technology priorities. Ideal Policy intern candidates have a passion for science and technology, possess strong written and verbal communication skills, the ability to work well on short deadlines while handling several projects, and a willingness to support outreach events and communications. A degree in engineering or science is preferred.

Legal Internships
Law students who would like to apply for this program have a unique opportunity to gather insights into the practice of law at the highest levels of the United States Government. Prior OSTP Interns have worked on a wide range of challenging substantive matters, including employment, appropriations, fiscal law, government contracts, ethics, information disclosure, international agreements, litigation, and pending legislation. OSTP’s “small firm” environment provides law students with the opportunity to work closely with senior attorneys, gain practical legal experience, and network with other emerging members of the legal profession. Interns work under the supervision of OSTP’s General Counsel and other supervising attorneys. Students in law school and LLM programs are encouraged to apply for legal internships using the “Legal” application. Legal interns gain diverse experience working on federal legal issues with government attorneys who support policy advisors.

Learn more on their website here.

I Like Meatloaf

OK – how is that for a random name for a running blog entry? What on earth could a love of meatloaf have to do with a fun trail run?  Read on, and you will see the origins of this seemingly non sequitor blog entry title! A few days ago, John, the “Chief Moose” announced an opportunity for a guided run on the last 7-10 miles of the Moosalamoo Ultra, a local 36 mile race in its sixth year.  Last year, due to conversations with the Forest Service, John, who is also the race organizer (and an accomplished “slightly above” middle-aged ultra runner himself) was required to reroute the original ultra course, which I ran a few years ago, to some new trails.  I was looking for a good weekend run as I slowly ramp up my mileage post-surgery, and this sounded like it would be a fun group run. Most of my group runs are with mere 10K-marathon runners, and in my current condition the running pace of my cadre of relative sprinters can be daunting.  I suspected that a group of ultra runners – runners who understand what it takes to run 8-10 hours or more – would be a good match for my current limitations over more casual distances.

The group met up at the Blueberry Hill Inn for this saturday run.  The previous 24 hours had been characterized by incessant downpours, but the high humidity had broken an hour or two before the run, giving us a cool sunny afternoon for the run.  We also suspected that the trails would be very muddy, and we would not be disappointed.  Looking up from the parking lot, we saw the day’s goal – Romance Mt, touted as the highest point with groomed cross country skiing trails in the east.  In fact, several years ago, I described a route very close to what we were doing today as a cross country ski tour, and I remembered that we were facing a challenging climb.

Romance Mt. from Blueberry Hill

 

 

We started off on the trail behind the Inn for a short distance before angling up the side of the hill, before reaching the best view of the day, or almost any day for that matter, the view of the Green Mountains from the side of Hogback Mt. In previous years, this has been the prime blueberry picking spot that gave the Blueberry Hill Inn its name, but apparently a controlled burn was carried out a few years ago, so I suspect there will be slim pickings for a few more years until the berries grow back.

Group Picture on Hogback

After a short descent from Hogback, we joined the dirt road, and followed it uphill to the crux of the day’s run, the steep mile ascent up the taller Romance Mt. This is a very steep trail, climbing close to 1000 vertical feet over the ascent. It was also frightening to realize that most of my fellow runners today would be facing this steep climb at Mile 31 of the Ultra in early August. Good Luck folks! At this point, the trail went from kind of wet to very muddy. Not a few puddles here or there- not a “get the soles of your sneakers dirty” muddy. This standing water and mud was incessantly over the ankles for almost the rest of the day’s run, and frequently threatened to rip my shoes off my feet. But hey – it’s trail running, so what’s a little extra adventure, right?

Just a little mud here!

After the steepest part of the descent, which should be much more passable in August, we came up to the big decision point. To the left, was a sign saying “7” and to the right one said “10”. I have become more accustomed to taking the shorter route, or shorter race more and more frequently as I mature, but still, it rankles me to take the shorter distance. Here is where the meatloaf analogy comes in: I like meatloaf, but when there is a longer route available, especially on a nice running day, taking the shorter route is kind of like going to a really classy restaurant, and ordering meatloaf. Sure, it tastes really good, but shouldn’t I be ordering the New York Strip? A few of the group started to mention some interest in the longer route, the New York Strip option, and I was tempted… but I was just warned yesterday by my physical therapist to not push too hard, too soon, so I chose the shorter route. So it was a good day for meatloaf!

Decisions, decisions…….

The rest of the group also decided to go for the shorter route as well today, so we enjoyed the long gradual descent down the Sucker Brook Trail before taking one last short climb up Stewart. The trail leveled off for most of the last mile before one final descent to the back of the Inn. After a round of high fives, we got together for one final group photo, showing off our muddy feet. The foot at 6 o’clock is mine, and those brown socks were white at the start of the run!

Trailrunner feet

At the end of the run, this was about 7.5 miles – my longest run since my injury, and it felt great. I also got to meet a fun bunch of runners with a great sense of comaraderie who are in training to accomplish some really amazing things this summer. I am going to stick to shorter races for now.

Looking east, from Blueberry Hill Inn

Google Earth of the run.


Altitude Profile

Travel Grants for STEM Students from Underrepresented Groups

These conferences and travel support may be of interest! Summer Undergrad Researchers: Apply for Travel Grants to October National Diversity in STEM Conference The Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) is accepting applications from summer undergraduate researchers for travel grants to the 2017 National Diversity in STEM Conference, which will be held […]

Public Service Fall 2017 Internship in DC

This is one of my favorite organizations.  Check it out!!

The Partnership’s Public Service Internship Program gives current students and recent graduates the opportunity to develop their professional skills while helping transform how government works.

Our interns do substantive, meaningful work that is integral to our day-to-day operations, programs and activities. While duties vary across our teams, interns may help plan events, research, write and work with outside partners, including federal agencies and colleges and universities.

Interns have opportunities to grow personally as well as professionally through workshops and training sessions geared toward students and young professionals. We offer the following compensation (less applicable taxes and deductions):

  • Full-time interns with an undergraduate or graduate degree will receive $1,000/month
  • Full-time interns who are currently undergraduate students will receive $800/month
  • Part-time intern compensation will be prorated accordingly

Apply by Friday, June 30 at this link:  https://ourpublicservice.org/about-us/internship-program.php