Category Archives: Midd Blogosphere

Public Folder access during e-mail transition

Dear Colleagues,

As you may have heard, Middlebury is in the process of moving our e-mail infrastructure to the cloud in stages – see http://go.middlebury.edu/cloud for details. While this has generally gone smoothly so far, there can be issues if people who have been migrated try to access other mailboxes that have not, or vice versa, especially on Macs. (Outlook for Windows generally works well, possibly after some adjustments as explained at http://go.middlebury.edu.mailmove.) In most cases we can move mailboxes together with the people who access them, but due to the nature of Public Folders they all need to be moved at once (currently scheduled for 8/30).

Bottom line: Mac users may find themselves unable to access Public Folders between the time that their own account is moved and August 30th. (Middfiles and other file servers will be unaffected; this is only for shared folders in Outlook e.g. department calendars.)

If this is an issue for your work, please comment here or e-mail zschuetz@middlebury.edu to discuss so we can find a solution.

We appreciate your patience as we strive to keep our systems functioning optimally.

Sincerely,

~Zach Schuetz
Middlebury College ITS

Student Supervisor Training

The Student Employment Office is happy to announce that we are once again offering training sessions for student supervisors. Information will be provided on recruiting, hiring and managing student employees. The first session will be held on Monday, August 29th from 9:30 – 10:30am in Axinn, room 100. Please email seo@middlebury.edu if you are interested in participating. Space is limited but more sessions will be offered during the academic year.

A Shepherd Intern on Her Experience and the Future

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My name is Nora O’Leary and this summer I am working at HOPE, a non-profit organization that provides food, clothing, and resources to low-income and homeless families in Addison County. HOPE has a food shelf, which is available to families once a month, and a surplus area stocked with day-old food from Hannaford’s supermarket and other generous locals. The organization earns money from sales at their thrift shop, Retroworks, which they use to aid families with a variety of expenses, from heating bills, to laundry vouchers, to car repairs. HOPE also provides assistance to homeless individuals with basic necessities, camping supplies, and with the difficult transition out of homelessness. Because HOPE is not a government-affiliated organization, the staff is able to be flexible and provide financial assistance based on a person’s needs at any given time rather than following strict guidelines. That means there is a lot of personal interaction with the clients, because the staff seeks to hear everyone’s stories and understand their struggles, in order to help them in the most effective way possible. As HOPE’s receptionist this summer, I have had the opportunity to have the initial contact with every client who walks in the door, hear their stories, and figure out how best to help them.

Coming into this summer, I wasn’t sure how this internship would relate to my (hopefully) future career as an elementary school teacher. However, I’ve found myself thinking about how closely related the cycle of poverty and education really are. Many clients that HOPE works with struggle with obesity, or drug addictions, have been incarcerated, or have never finished high school. These problems are ones that people are often harshly judged for in our society, because they all involve making some poor choices along the way. However, more and more I have thought about the young child within each of those clients who comes in. Who taught that child about nutrition, or warned them against drug use, or encouraged them to release frustration in healthy, non-violent ways? What about the child who quit school to start working and help his parents pay to keep the heating on in the winter? Many of the clients who come into HOPE everyday never had someone to teach them important lessons about finances and managing money, or a positive role model whose example they could follow in life. A teacher can be a hugely positive influence on a child, and this job has made me so eager to be that for a child someday. I continue to think about how a client’s life might have been different had they someone who believed in them, and encouraged them to work their hardest in and out of school everyday. I am hugely grateful for so many things this summer has taught me, but motivating me to continue on my way to becoming a public school teacher is an unforeseen and wonderful outcome

Nora O’Leary, ’17

Revised Instructions for Aug 18 “Intent to Apply” Deadline for Fulbright Applicants

For those intending to apply for a Fulbright grant this fall, we need to revise our submission process for our August 18 “intend to apply” deadline. Here’s what we would like you to do: Send the following to fellowships@middlebury.edu by end of day (midnight) on Aug 18: Word attachment for your two essays (statement of grant […]

Weekly Web Updates – August 15, 2016

We have removed the PRiNZ themes from being available on our WordPress sites. Sites already using these these should not notice any change, but you will no longer see them in the list on the Appearance -> Themes page in the site dashboard. The themes are no longer supported by the vendor and cause issues with the WYSIWYG editor in recent versions of WordPress.

Updates

Fixes and Tweaks

  • Fixed an issue where, when fetching the content of gallery captions in our Drupal sites, the results weren’t properly filtered and content from the pages images were embedded in was being displayed instead of the caption field of the image itself.
  • Enabled multi-file uploads for the Museum website.
  • Removed the image tags field from File Uploads on the MIIS website.

From MSA: Back to School Shopping

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Time for back-to-school shopping!  Aside from the mid-year field trip or random science project, August is typically the one month where you spend a lot of money on school stuff, which means it could potentially mess up your regular spending plan.  Don’t worry!  We’ve got a few tips to help you stay on track.

Adjust Your Budget for Success

First, you need to assess and modify your spending plan to fit potentially hundreds of dollars into this month’s list of expenses.  Parents spend an average of $630 on back-to-school purchases,1 so planning ahead is essential.

Look at how much money you have available.  How much money in savings can and should go towards education costs?  How much of your discretionary spending can you allocate for your shopping trip?

Make a list of all the supplies you will need to get.  Did the teacher provide a list of books and tools?  Do you need to buy a school uniform?  Check your drawers and closets for supplies and clothing first so you don’t spend money on things you already have available.  And remember to bring your list of items so you can stick to what you need.  (If you don’t have a list, you’re more likely to either buy more than necessary or forget something and have to spend more on gas going back for the items.)

If you still need to make a few extra bucks before you head to the mall, grab any items collecting dust in your back closet and throw a garage sale, then put the proceeds toward your back-to-school fund.

Make a (Thrifty) Fashion Statement

You know your kids will ask for the latest and greatest fashion trends.  Dime-store tennis shoes for the first day of school just won’t cut it – they prefer the hundred-dollar shoes.  Of course, you look at your wallet, remember the mortgage and the backpack full of desk supplies you already paid for, and brace yourself for the tantrum that comes after you say, “No.”

Hold up.  There may be a way.

Before you go shopping, check for coupons, discounts and rebates.  Look at sites like Groupon, LivingSocial, ibotta andRetailMeNot.  These sites give you deals that could make big-ticket items more affordable and budget friendly.  Just remember to peruse their offers before you get in the car so you can plan where you need to go; for example, you might find a coupon for those expensive shoes, but it only works at a particular retailer.

You could also see if there’s an outlet store near you that carries major shoe brands (or other school stuff) at discount prices, and you can look for student discounts on everything from clothes to electronics (just don’t forget to bring a valid student ID).

Protect Your Purchases

Did you know that 85% of parents plan on using their smartphones for buying school materials?2  If you decide to use your phone for shopping online or pulling up coupons, remember to check security before making a transaction.  Look for the lock symbol and https before the web address, which signifies the proper Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protection.

Do not use a random Wi-Fi network while shopping online.  Fraudsters set up fake Wi-Fi networks that look like legitimate business internet connections, and they hack your device when you connect to their phony network.

Also check your receipts and credit card statements for any possible errors, like being charged twice for something or not receiving proper credit for a coupon.

Work with a Professional

Preparing your budget for back-to-school purchases, extra trips to the gas station for driving back and forth from school, and money for field trips and extracurricular activities can seem like a daunting objective.  Your Money Coach and Budget Specialist can help your family start the school year on a good financial foot.  Your Money Coach can provide suggestions and options you may not have considered.  And don’t forget Wallet: our personal financial management software that shows all your account activity in one place, allows you to set spending goals and alerts, and more, which makes it easier to be smart with your money while you shop.  Call 888-724-2326 or visit our website to get started.

Mid-Year Performance Evaluations for Staff Members

Annual written performance evaluations are conducted for staff members between January 1 and March 31 of each year as part of the College’s ongoing performance feedback process.  Also part of this process, informal performance evaluation meetings are conducted at six-month intervals between the annual written performance evaluations.  For most staff, informal evaluation meetings occur between July and September.

The annual evaluation process is designed to give employees and supervisors an opportunity to evaluate work accomplishments and performance during the review period and establish goals and objectives for the future.  The informal evaluation provides a valuable opportunity for mid-year feedback, review of the progress in meeting goals, and plans for any necessary adjustments.

Supervisors should be making plans to meet with their staff members to conduct mid-year performance discussions if not already completed.  Staff and supervisors should contact Human Resources with any questions or concerns about the performance evaluation process by calling x5465, option 1.