Tag Archives: library

Telephone System Replacement at Middlebury and Monterey campuses and Washington, D.C. office

Why:

  • Middlebury campus PBX is 20 years old, past end-of-life, operating with elevated risk
  • Realize modern unified communication features to enhance user-friendliness, efficiency
  • Integrate calling between Middlebury, Monterey Washington, D.C. office

What:

  Cisco Systems Unified Communications
  • Provides voice, video, conferencing, desktop collaboration, instant messaging, presence indication including Jabber softphone and mobile client.
  • New voice mail system with email integration for all.
  • New telephones, or headsets for those who choose to use soft-phone application.
  Training
  • Customized online user training for Cisco phones and Jabber softphone client.
  • Professional trainer to conduct end-user training for Middlebury campus department liaisons.

When:

  • Middlebury campus – October, November, December 2017
  • Monterey campus – January 2018
  • Washington, D.C. office – January 2018

ITS will keep all informed through MiddPoints updates and in our Unified Communications Project web page.

Systems Maintenance this Sunday, July 30th

During our regular 6am – 10am EST maintenance window we have the following activities scheduled:

 

  • The VT campuses PaperCut print management system will be upgraded to address an issue with the WebPrint feature
    • Print servers will be unavailable for use up to 90 minutes during the maintenance window
    • Afterward, upgrading the individual print release stations will take an additional 90-120 minutes

 

We appreciate your patience as we continuously strive to keep our systems functioning optimally.

 

Regards,

Billy

 

Billy Sneed

ITS – Central Systems & Network Services

Middlebury College

Japan Times at Middlebury

Over time, the Japan Times changed its official title a few times, so it can be hard to find a particular article from a particular date. Now that we have access to The Japan Times Archives, here’s a guide:

Current issues:

Today’s Japan Times and content from recent weeks can be found by anyone anywhere at the Japan Times website. (An individual without a subscription is limited to a few articles per month.)

Older issues:

For older content, Middlebury users now have access to the Japan Times Archives

The archive include articles published since its inception in 1897, including all of these variations:

  • Japan Times (1897-1940)
  • Japan Advertiser (1905-1940)
  • Japan Times and Advertiser (1940-1942)
  • Nippon Times (1943-1956)
  • Japan Times (1956-present)

As of this writing, the Archives include content through December 31, 2015; 2016 content is expected in the near future.

VT Historic Sites Pass now available at the Circulation Desk

Now available for checkout from the Davis Family Library Circulation desk: a family pass (up to 8 people in one vehicle) for free entry into a Vermont Historic Site. This means you can go see and of these historic sites – the Bennington Battle Monument, President Calvin Coolidge, Chimney Point, Hubbardton Battlefield, Senator Justin S. Morrill, Mount Independence, Old Constitution House, President Chester A. Arthur, and Eureka Schoolhouse and Baltimore Covered Bridge – for the bottom line price of zero dollars! At that price, you can’t afford to NOT go learn some history!

“Postcard to Mum”

If you visit the Davis Family Library atrium between now and Sunday, May 21st, you will see a very special display on the main floor, and continued in the glass display case on the Upper Level. Here’s what it’s about:

Middlebury student Miguel Castillo renders an artistic tribute to his mother with this interactive display.

Name: Miguel A. Castillo

Year: Junior/third-year

Major: Dance/Theatre

Hometown: Caracas, Venezuela

Collaborators: Aida Rodríguez [Tata], Andrew Pester, my family

Thanks Yous/Acknowledgements: Joseph Watson, Danielle Rougeau, Kim Gurney, Joseph Watson, Katrina Spencer, Deborah Leedy, Katrina Moore, Angela Valenzuela, Gabriel Ferreras, Emina Mahmuljin, Cathy Collins, Hedya Klein, Milo Stanley, Eliza Renner, Nando Sandoval, Ximena Mejia,  Wonnacott Commons, International Student Organization, and everyone else that said yes to this.

So what is this that you’ve set up on the main and upper levels of the Davis Family Library?

Part of the display on the upper level of Davis Family Library

It’s a three-part art installation that explores nostalgia, loss, and memory. This past year has been hard for me. On March 30th, 2016, my mother was diagnosed with brain cancer. On June 12th, 2016, she passed away under a bright blue sky. Dealing with her physical absence has been a journey, a messy one. I compare this process to dropping a stone in the ocean water. A stone that falls in water makes ripples; at first they are small, intense and constant. With time, they become more spaced out but larger. They are all the result of the same stone. This art installation has been an opportunity to collect my feelings about what is going on– a space to bring out what cries and laughs inside. My grandmother, my mom’s mom, came to live with me for a month, so I thought that having an artistic project to collaborate on would give us the opportunity to deal with something that is hard for us both, and this is what we came up with.

How are library patrons supposed to interact with it?

I hope people come to see it and check out all the parts. There is a typewriter, some postcards, envelopes and stamps. My hope is that people use them to write with an open heart to whomever comes to their minds. Maybe they’ll write one and send it to a random address. Mother’s Day is coming up soon. I hope that people can reflect on the ephemerality of life. Live fully not because one will die but because one is alive. Life is a fleeting moment and, as my mother said, “No hay tiempo para pendejadas” (“There’s no time for bullsh*t”.)

What do you hope the community will gain from the display?

I hope people stop for a second, breathe, and keep going feeling even more human.

The Library Responds to the Charles A. Murray Visit

The Middlebury Libraries are sensitive to the discord on campus surrounding Charles A. Murray’s recent visit. Given our core role of providing access to as wide a range of information as possible, as well as teaching the skills necessary to interpret and assess that information, we thought it might be useful to outline some of the ways we have responded to the controversy.

  • We have purchased additional copies of core titles by Charles A. Murray in order to meet the heightened interest from the community.  The library also holds multiple copies of works that respond to and/or dispute Murray’s conclusions, such as William Wilson’s The Truly Disadvantaged, and Stephen Jay Gould’s The Mismeasure of Man;
  • In response to the Scott Center for Spiritual and Religious Life’s email message recommending specific books about conflict resolution, we purchased titles we were lacking and highlighted these works with a display in the library atrium.  This display remained in place for over three weeks and was also highlighted in The Campus;
  • Special Collections has been identifying, collecting, and preserving a variety of Web-based content relating to the controversy and protests. This material includes blogs and social media feeds created by student political action groups, as well as local news articles covering the events. We hope that these Web archiving efforts — in addition to our growing collection of donated images and video — will enable future researchers and generations of Middlebury students to understand the Murray visit and the March protests in a fuller context, and ensure that student voices continue to be heard more clearly than they might be if relying solely on secondary, mainstream sources;
  • Special Collections also received a donation of digital photographs, videos, articles and responses to the Murray protest from August Hutchinson ‘16.5.  These materials, which the donor has called “The Middlebury Moment,” are now held in our digital repository along with other student-created materials documenting the event.

We continue to seek ways to provide thorough information about Murray’s work, the various responses to it in the literature, and the recent protests relating to his visit to Middlebury.  If there are additional titles that might speak to any these themes, we encourage you to submit them at go/requests/ (or go.middlebury.edu/requests/ if off-campus).  Finally, please feel free to email us with other ideas for the Libraries to consider as we continue to respond as a community to these challenging issues.