Archive for Career Advice

Now that we’re both back on campus, let’s get started in thinking about how you can translate your interests and passions  into a career with an impact! There are lots of opportunities while here at Middlebury to explore social change both inside and outside the classroom.  For instance, the newly formed Center for Education in Action (EIA) is a great place to start: you’ll find opportunities for civic engagement like volunteering in the community; attending or leading an alternative break trip (MALT); a vast number of competitive post-graduate fellowship resources and some undergraduate fellowships too; resources to obtain funding for an unpaid summer internship; internships offered by alumni, parents and employers looking for Middkids; advice on how to jump-start your job search and lots of employer information sessions throughout the year — just to name a few!

There are also lots of other initiatives on campus to explore and to connect your academic and outside the class experiences.  Check out MOJO to find a J-term internship off campus for credit and don’t forget to visit the Project on Creativity and Innovation to unharness your creative ideas and juices!

There is lots to share with you, so feel free to come into EIA and set up an appointment to talk to me about your passions, ideas and plans…we’re all ears here!  For now, I hope to get out interesting information that is relevant to CCG and finding opportunities that will help you to make a positive impact in the world.

Since we know some of you will refer back to this blog after graduation, we will start tagging articles that promote opportunities so that they fit into several categories: undergraduate opp(ortunities) or alumni opp(ortunities). Feel free to comment as well; we love the feedback!

As part of the 23rd Annual Hannah A. Quint Lecture in Jewish Studies titled: “Global Hunger 2011 and our Role as Global Citizens”, guest lecturer, Ruth Messinger, President of the American Jewish World Service, will hold a Career Conversation on global social justice issues on Thursday, February 24th at 7:30 PM at the Brainerd Commons House (132 Blinn Lane). All students welcome!

Some background on Ruth Messinger:

Ruth W. Messinger is the president and executive director Read the rest of this entry »

Thinking about studying abroad or pursuing international service work, research, internship, or other form of international immersion experience?

If yes, then broaden your thinking and enhance your preparation by attending the following workshop!

Meaningful International Research, Civic Engagement, and Internships: Charting a Course to Plan, Fund, and Implement Out-of-Classroom Projects

  • Wednesday, February 16, 4:30-6 p.m., Robert A. Jones House conference room

This workshop will address how to:

  • design effective projects
  • prepare for the practical aspects of overseas experiential learning: research, internships and volunteering
  • enhance cultural awareness
  • optimize effectiveness abroad
  • reflect on the experience and integrate it back home

For further information:  Peggy Burns (x3450, mburns@middlebury.edu) or Tiffany Sargent (x5082, tiffanys@middlebury.edu)  (ACE/EIA)

Sponsored by Center for Education in Action and Rohatyn Center for International Affairs

Student comments after a previous offering:

“I am a little disappointed that I did not do more abroad because I did not have this knowledge.”

Yes, you have an interest in food, but corporate dining and hotel chain eateries are not your focus: you want to make a difference in the world. Taylor Cocalis and Dorothy Neagle, Co-Founders of GoodFoodJobs.com will talk about the variety of ways to work in food – from entry level to expert, day job to lifetime fulfillment – and how to go about securing a good food job.

Come join the Career Conversation:
WHEN: 4:15 PM, Wednesday, November 10, 2010
WHERE: Franklin Environmental Center, The Orchard, Rm. 103
(Refreshments and snacks provided by MCOG & Weybridge House.)

They’ll answer the following questions, and more:
What exactly is a good food job, anyway?
What are some examples of existing good food jobs?
How do you find them?
How do you get them?
How do you grow in and beyond your good food job?

Co-sponsored by Career Services, the Middlebury College Organic Garden and Weybridge House.

Oct
11
Filed Under (Career Advice) by on October 11, 2010 and tagged

What’s so great about a liberal arts education? Every Midd Kid asks this question especially during their senior year when they see job posts that specifically seek out undergraduate students with a communications or business major. Well Midd Kid, let me answer your question.

WRITING SKILLS. Think about the 2 CW courses that we are required to take in order to graduate. Remember your FYS and how you had to write and rewrite essays during your first months at Midd? What about all those papers you have to write for class? Correct me if I’m wrong but, thinking back on my 24 classes (Chinese included), each class required some sort of writing, and each professor had their own specific writing preferences that Midd Kids had to cater to. Middlebury basically gives you 4 years to seriously hone those writing skills that businesses want!

Don’t believe me? Just ask Dalya F. Massachi from OpportunityKnocks.org.

Massachi wrote: Employers know that writing well will help you succeed in fundraising, marketing/outreach, advocacy, project management, administration, etc. No matter if you’re at the entry level or in senior management, strong writing skills are critical if you want to capture the interest and attention of your constituents and prospective donors. Virtually everyone working in the nonprofit sector has to do some writing at some point. And the better you can do that, the deeper and broader your impact will be. Your organization may produce great work or come up with outstanding ideas, but if you present those achievements or thoughts poorly they will not get very far.

Midd Kid, you are special. There are people out there who want you.

By: Green Career Central

One of the most uncomfortable parts of attending green networking events is knowing you’ll have to introduce yourself to relative strangers in a short period of time.
Read the rest of this entry »

Brought to you by: Green Collar Blog

Get the Green Job You Want Now is a program by the Columbia Business School Alumni Club of New York that will take place on October 25 in New York City.  This event will feature a panel of executives who will share their experiences of successfully transitioning into green jobs and include opportunities to meet with green recruiters before and after the panel.

Read the rest of this entry »

By: Green Career Central

One of the challenges of finding a new job or a new career is looking at your existing skills and experience and connecting the dots to figure out which careers are a good fit for you.

I’ve been thinking about this process within a few scenarios. Read the rest of this entry »

May
10
Filed Under (Career Advice) by on May 10, 2010

As finals approach and as you finish your last classes, remember that the CSO is still here for you (even after you graduate!)

Drop in hours with counselors will continue this week from 2 to 5 PM. If you want to talk about how to approach your summer employer, or how to find a job when you are at home, stop by!

Happy hunting!

Class of 2013 and 2013.5,

Tonight (Monday) and Tomorrow (Tuesday) night, the Peer Career Advisors from the C.S.O. are hosting a workshop called Decision Points: A Road Map to Sophomore Year.

Current Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors (not staff of the College) will talk with you about

  • Chosing a Major and a Major advisor,
  • Identifing Career Interests and Skills,
  • Contacting Employers and
  • Using CSO Resources

It will be held both Monday and Tuesday from 7 – 8 PM in the Gifford Annex Classroom. The workshop will help you prepare for your sophomore year and use your summer wisely.

Please join our Facebook event Decision Points.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Apr
22

Check out Five Ways to Avoid a Terrible Internship before the summer begins!.

They recommend asking questions and having realistic expectations to make your internship as painless as possible.

Many college students lack what they believe to be relevant experience in the job market. Don’t worry if this is you, you have plenty of other marketable skills!

College Students rarely see the importance of their computer skills. If you are competent in Excel, Word or other programs, include it on your resume!

Coaching and Teaching experience are also valuable. They show leadership, command of a subject and the ability to work with other people.

Awards also help beef up your resume. Were you on the Dean’s list this past semester? Were you a college scholar? Are you an eagle scout? Did you win in the cribbage tournament? Whether or not these seem important to you, it is crucial to realize that these represent many skills that employers are looking for.

Leadership experience, such as being the treasurer for a club or the captain of a team, is also something that is important.

For more ideas, check out The Intern Coach’s Q&A section.

Being a Career Counselor on weekly Drop-Ins at Career Services (CSO) allows you to confront all kinds of situations: from the student who really has no clue what they want to do when they graduate in May to the student that is looking to get back abroad after a return from their study-abroad experience. All types of inquiries are welcomed and encouraged! Frankly, the less straight forward, possibly the more satisfaction a student might walk away with if I’m able to assist them in realizing their own strengths and skills that are transferable and applicable to just about anything (well, almost anything!)

One area I’ve seen a lot of traffic lately is students looking to find ways to get back overseas for either summer internships or jobs. So here are a few tips in looking for those opportunities: Read the rest of this entry »

It was great to see you all at the Spring Job Fling this afternoon. We had a great turn out!

For those of you who couldn’t make it, don’t worry! There are still jobs out there.

Here you can find the packet that we were handing out. It contains a sample of jobs that are out there in the environmental, social welfare, and common good sectors.

For those of you interested in working in Education check out our Education Jobs and Resources listing here here!

And remember to use MOJO and LACN to look for jobs. If you have any questions, post a comment or come to drop in hours at the CSO, which happen 2 to 5 every weekday.

Feb
18
Filed Under (Career Advice, General Green Opportunities) by on February 18, 2010

Do you know the most recent news with the smart grid? What about the scoop on electric cars?

One important way to stay in tune with job opportunities is to leep track of the most recent tech innovations. That is why I recommend Earth2Tech.com. Earth2Tech is a great resource for staying touch with the world outside of Middlebury. From maps of clean tech startups (mentioned in a December post if you recall), to updates on innovations such as the ecoATM, Earth2Tech.com is amazing. To find categorical listings, go to the Maps section, and Read the rest of this entry »

While MOJO’s offerings are high quality, students can be frustrated with the small number of opportunities.

LACN (found on the first page of MOJO), has an even larger number of options; however, sometimes even those are not what you are looking for.

There are other options available to you.

  • Midd-Only Resources
  • Networking
  • Brute Force

Read the rest of this entry »

global

Don’t forget that Gretchen Wallace, founder of Global Grassroots will be here in the CSO Library Thursday, February 18 from 2:30-4:00 as a Social Entrepreneur-in-Residence to answer any questions you may have about how she launched her career coming from a liberal arts background.  She can provide value insight about how you might launch your own project and give advice about realistic hurdles one may encounter in the road.

Stop by and visit with Gretchen!

Feb
15

Getting to 350:
What’s Next for the Climate Movement?
with BILL MCKIBBEN & 350.org ORGANIZERS
Middlebury College
February 16, 2010 (11:30am)
104 Aiken Building
University of Vermont

or at
http://thesolutionsjournal.com/seminarserieslive

solutions

October 24th, 2009 was called “the most widespread day of political action in the planet’s history,” with more than 5200 events in 181 countries. Through these and related events, citizens from all over the world increased pressure on world leaders to adopt a fair, ambitious, and binding treaty, the kind of treaty that the latest science demands. As this new decade gets underway, movement leaders are reflecting on what has worked and what should come next. In this talk, the founders of 350.org Read the rest of this entry »

Gretchen Wallace will be on campus

this week only.

Her work in development in Africa, women and development, and her NGO Global Grassroots will be the topic of her talks on campus. Gretchen is the sister of Brian Steidle, the American marine who was the first to bring evidence of the genocide in Darfur out of Sudan. He broke the story with Nicholas Kristoff, and later collaborated with Gretchen to produce the documentary film. This week she will host a workshop, a lecture and more.

Gretchen Wallace, in sponsorship with the African Studies Department, is featuring her documentary, ‘The Devil Came on HorsebackRead the rest of this entry »

Nov
25

Do you have a solid network that you can rely on? And no, I am not talking about the 1976 Oscar-winning movie “Network.”  Instead, I am referring to the tried and true method of meeting people and organizing your contacts in order to help you out in the job market.

Why Network

One benefit is access to job and internship opportunities that are only available through friends, family and colleagues. Also, with a solid network, you have access to advice from people who actually know you. To this point, it’s no coincidence that seed capital for entrepreneurs tends to start with the friends and family network.

How To Network

When networking, it is important to organize yourself. So, get out your Rolodex and start sorting. But, if you don’t have a Rolodex (I sadly admit that I have never used one), a notebook, or a computer spreadsheet will work just fine. It is important to keep track of your contacts’ names, what they have been up to, how you met them etc. Furthermore it is important to keep in touch. But, don’t only keep in touch when you need something from your contact. Try to call/e-mail/grab lunch during the good times so that when you do need their help, they don’t only remember you as someone “taking” but maybe as someone who they want to stay in touch with based on your common interests.

It is also important to meet new contacts. While this might be unnerving, Middlebury has a great alumni network called MiddNet to help you out. eNetSC.com offers amazing advice on how to approach a potential contact. They recommend that you “solicit career tips and advice from your contact.” However, they stress that you avoid asking questions such as “‘Do you know of any jobs that would be good for me?’” For more tips, make sure to check out their article.

When To Network

All holidays, parties and events are networking opportunities. An article at CNNMoney.com recommends that to these events you arrive unfashionably early because it is easier to enter a room full of five strangers than it is to enter a room with thirty strangers.  Furthermore, the article brings up the fact that if you are there early you already have your conversation starter, So, um, I guess we’re the first ones here …

How To Make It Last

And last but not least, make sure you help out your contacts. Whether the person is another student, a friend’s uncle or a family member, if the person asks for help, try to give it. You might not have a job offer in your pocket waiting to give someone, but if you know of a new company in someones sector, let them know. A relationship is about communication as well as give and take, all of which applies to networking. As in all cases, if someone helps you out, write them a thank you note. There is nothing like a little bit of gratitude to nudge someone towards rose-colored glasses.