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Discovering research statistics on China

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Welcome back to the China Data Center, an online statistical database with the following datasets:

  • Monthly Statistics
  • National Statistics
  • Provincial Statistics
  • City Statistics
  • County Statistics
  • Monthly Industrial Data
  • Monthly Industrial Data 1999-2002
  • Yearly Industrial Data
  • Yearly Industrial Data 1999-2002
  • Statistics on Map
  • Provincial Yearbook (2002 – )
  • Provincial Yearbook ( – 2001)
  • City Yearbook
  • National Yearbook

China Data Center offers some freebies on its website, including a list of geo-spatial vector data including lakes, rivers, canals, and other landforms and a separate listing of free, two-dimensional maps including traffic noise in major cities, coal production, and energy consumption, to name only a few.

NASA satellite image of China

MUSE to have integrated eBooks and eJournal platform in 2012

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

More after the break (including link to preview).  The most essential piece of information is:

MUSE will provide a one-month preview period during January 2012 to allow librarians and scholars to discover the significant breadth and depth of both book and journal content available on Project MUSE.  At the end of the preview period, January 31, 2012, search results will default to only content to which the searcher has full-text access. At this point, users will have the option to toggle the search to show all available books and journals relevant to a search, if desired.

(Currently Middlebury has no eBooks available in full-text on MUSE.)

Project MUSE’s redesigned platform, incorporating both books and journals in an integrated interface, goes live on January 1, 2012. A preview of the new platform is available on our beta site at http://beta.muse.jhu.edu.

Over 300 free sample books remain accessible on the beta site through the end of 2011.

Two video tutorials for searching and browsing within the new interface are now available. Additional instructional materials will be provided shortly after the platform launch. View and share the new tutorials here:

Search Books and Journals on Project MUSE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bhldo-sLktk&feature=youtube_gdata

Browse Books and Journals on Project MUSE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrR9wM-R2dM&feature=youtube_gdata

The new platform will provide digital access to over 14,000 books from 66 university presses and related scholarly publishers, alongside MUSE’s over

500 electronic journals. A search box on every page of the site offers users the option of searching both books and journals, or filtering by content type prior to running the search. At the search results level, users may again filter to just books or just journals.

At launch on January 1, all of the books in MUSE’s new UPCC Book Collections will be visible in search results and when browsing on the platform. Users at libraries which have purchased or subscribed to book collections on MUSE will have full-text access to content from those collections.

MUSE will provide a one-month preview period during January 2012 to allow librarians and scholars to discover the significant breadth and depth of both book and journal content available on Project MUSE.  At the end of the preview period, January 31, 2012, search results will default to only content to which the searcher has full-text access. At this point, users will have the option to toggle the search to show all available books and journals relevant to a search, if desired.

Further highlights of the new Project MUSE platform include:

- Faceted searching, with options to filter search results by subject area, author, and language of publication

- Enhanced browsing by subject area, title, or publisher, across books and journals or filtered by content type

- Powerful new hierarchical subject structure, allowing users to drill down to the most relevant content

- Search box on each page of the site, with predictive search terms

- New access icons to help users clearly identify content to which they have paid access, free sample content, and open access content

- Discovery and research tools at both the book and journal article level, including More by This Author and Related Content links, citation downloading/exporting, and social sharing

- “Search Inside…” feature for both books and journals

- DOIs at title and chapter level for books, article level for journals

The beta site and the current site will continue to operate in parallel until December 31, 2011, with the new platform going live January 1, 2012.

The Project MUSE URL remains http://muse.jhu.edu. Links to scholarly content in MUSE (journal articles and issues) will not be affected by the platform change, but libraries and users which have bookmarked informational pages within the site may need to update these bookmarks after the January 1 transition.

To reiterate, for the one-month preview period of January 2012, searches on the new platform will default to displaying all relevant book and journal results, unless the user selects to filter to only books or only journals at the time of searching. After January 31, 2012, search results will default to only that journal and/or book content to which a user has full-text access.

Questions about the platform transition, UPCC Book Collections on Project MUSE, or related issues may be directed to Project MUSE Customer Support at muse@press.jhu.edu.

Road Map to Student Services recap

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Yesterday Pij and I represented LIS at the Road Map to Student Services event; part of First Year Orientation, which was held concurrently with the Academic Forum in Kenyon. Half of the incoming First Year class attended the Forum while the other half were given “Passports” and asked to collect stickers from each Student Services station they visited (after which they were rewarded with a “frozen novelty”). Then they switched, and the students who had already attended the Forum attended the Road Map event. Since Pij and I handed out a sticker to every student with whom we spoke during the 2.5 hour event, it was easy to keep track of how many we’d spoken with—over 80! No wonder my voice is a little hoarse today.

What kinds of questions did we field? Pij may have heard other questions, but I think by far the most common questions were relating to connecting to Wireless, installing Microsoft Office, and followed by general questions about how to find/check out books and other materials from the Library. Other questions I heard ranged from “What is LIS”, to “Do you have any job openings?”, to “Can you help me set up email on my smartphone?”. Quite a few students stopped by without specific questions, and Pij’s go-to prompt, “Have you been able to set up your computer okay?” was great at drawing out other concerns and questions. I copied her and used that question quite a few times, and also tried asking about their First Year Seminar courses, which gave me a chance to let them know that a Librarian was assigned to each course, as well as a Peer Mentor and explain about CTLR and how it was related to the Library.

All in all it was a great chance to meet new students, hear how things were going for them, and also learn (from Pij) what to say about some of the most common tech-troubleshooting questions. It also underscored for me how essential it was for Pij and I (as LIS representatives) to be fully up-to-speed on recent and forthcoming changes in technology infrastructure and research tools.