Author Archives: Rebekah Irwin

About Rebekah Irwin

Director of Collections & Archives at the Middlebury College Libraries.

Observatory Fever

The Middlebury College Observatory, GIF-ified here by Special Collections Film Preservation Assistant Sam Cartwright, opened in 1937 and was torn down to make way for the construction of McCardell Bicentennial Hall. Read Sam’s blog post, Romance of the Skies to learn more. Then, get your celestial body to the new Middlebury College Observatory during one of their Open House Nights. The first is scheduled for Friday, May 29th from 9:00PM-10:30PM.

 

Middlebury College Observatory, c. 1940
Middlebury College Observatory, c. 1940

Stacks & Tracks the WRMC Radio Hour celebrates National Poetry Month with guest DJ, Karin Gottshall

Join us this Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at 12p-1p when Stacks & Tracks, the Special Collections & Archives radio show, celebrates National Poetry Month with Karin Gottshall, poet, Visiting Lecturer in English and American Literatures, and director of the New England Young Writers’ Conference at Bread Loaf. It will be music to your ears, promise.

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Wednesdays 12p-1p, live at 91.1FM or live-streaming through iTunes or online.

WRMC’s Stacks & Tracks is back! With guest DJ, Prof. Christopher Star

We’re back. On the air, and live streaming, at a new time.

Wednesdays, 12p-1p

Tune-in during your lunch hour to the radio show that reveals the secrets of special collections.

This week we’ll be joined by guest DJ, Classics Professor Christopher Star for Episode #12, featuring music and talk inspired by the thought, art, and life of ancient Greece and Rome.

Mozart to Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Cash to The Doors. Be there. And be enlightened. With a soundtrack.

91.1FM | iTunes radio | listen online | on your phone

Stacks and Tracks

WRMC Studio, 1970. From the Middlebury College Archives.

A “first-rate beer” voucher, 2,000 years overdue

In special collections, visitors often ask us, “What’s your most expensive item?” Or sometimes: “What’s the oldest thing you have?”

In late November, we acquired our newest, oldest thing: a baked clay tablet that originated in ancient Mesopotamia (current-day Iraq), from roughly 2,000 BCE. This small tablet (measuring just about 1 inch x 1 inch and pictured here) is incised with cuneiform script, considered to be one of the earliest forms of writing.


With the help of Middlebury alum Seth Richardson, Class of 1990, a historian of the ancient Near East at the University of Chicago, we’re learning more about our new acquisition. Likely in British and American hands since the early 20th century, our tablet is essentially a beer coupon. That’s right. Based only on preliminary examination, Dr. Richardson translated the first line: “3 liters of first-rate beer.”

And as it turns out, the Western tradition of beer brewing began in Mesopotamia between 3500 – 3100 BCE. How do we know? Largely from cuneiform tablets like ours, which contain detailed records around beer production, the delivery of raw materials (barley, yeast, bread, flour), and the trading of beer products. Like apple cider production in colonial New England, ancient Mesopotamians lacked clean water, but had an abundance of grains and the know-how needed to ferment them. And they had the earliest known written alphabet to boot.

Funds for the purchase of this item were gifted by Jeri Bapasola, French School, 1978.

References

Beer in the Ancient World.” Ancient History Encyclopedia. Accessed December 3, 2015.

Damerow, Peter. “Sumerian Beer: The Origins of Brewing Technology in Ancient Mesopotamia.” Cuneiform Digital Library Journal, no. 2 (2012).

Prof. Shalom Goldman, guest DJ on WRMC’s Stacks & Tracks

Our first guest DJ, Professor Shalom Goldman (Religion) joins Stacks & Tracks, the Special Collections & Archives radio show

Monday, November 2, 9am-10am

Tune-in to hear a half-century of rock, folk, reggae, and punk music, inspired by biblical stories.
With commentary, of course.
albumsbible

91.9FM | iTunes radio | listen online | on your phone

Prof. Shalom Goldman, guest DJ on WRMC’s Stacks & Tracks

Join us and our first guest DJ, Professor Shalom Goldman (Religion)

 

Episode #4, Stacks & Tracks, the Special Collections & Archives radio show, Monday, November 2, 9am-10am

 

Tune-in to hear a half-century of popular music, inspired by biblical stories.
With commentary, of course.

 

albumsbible

91.9FM | iTunes radio | listen online | on your phone

 

“Stacks and Tracks” Special Collections on the radio

From the restricted-access bowels of the library basement come wonders like you’ve never seen (and still can’t because it’s radio).

Join us on WRMC 91.1 FM Mondays, from 9am-10am for Stacks and Tracks, a special collections and archives-themed radio show. We’ll play songs loosely based on a theme, share hidden gems from the library stacks, and coax special guests to join us.

Tune-in at 91.9FM, on iTunes radio, listen online here, or on your phone using tunein radio (download the app and search for WRMC).

Visit us. We’re open M-F, 1p-5p in the basement of Davis Library. Meet the voices behind Stacks and Tracks and see some hidden gems with your own eyes.

WRMC
Special Collections Postgraduate Fellow for Special Collections, Mikaela Taylor, bringing you tracks from the stacks in the WRMC studio October 5, 2015. Photo by Rebekah Irwin, Curator of Special Collections.

 

Helen Flanders
Helen Hartness Flanders, Vermont ethnographer and song-collector, with a recording device, date unknown. From the Helen Hartness Flanders Ballad Collection, Special Collections & Archives, Middlebury College.