Tag Archives: Social Justice

FEBS: Work on Climate Justice with 350VT

This in from Middlebury student and Board member: “350Vermont is hiring a full-time Lead Organizer to join our staff collective of climate justice organizers! We’re looking for a grassroots organizer with at least several years of experience and a well-developed justice analysis, highly capable of collaboration and committed to shared leadership, passionate about movement-building, outgoing and energetic, ideally with some nonprofit management experience, and ideally based in the Burlington area or in central VT.

The majority of this role is leading 350VT’s campaigns, mobilization efforts, and solidarity work, but the Lead Organizer will also join the other staff collective members in co-leading some of the internal aspects of maintaining and developing the organization. We’re still in the process of an organizational transition to a shared leadership structure, which takes a long time and requires a lot of intentionality. A person who is a good fit for the Lead Organizer role will be able to lead 350VT’s organizing productively even while our structure continues to evolve and organizational vision continues to be clarified, will believe in and value collective leadership, will be patient with the process, and will be enthusiastic about participating in building the systems for our work together.

The Lead Organizer position is full time (35 hours/week), ideally based out of our Burlington office or central Vermont. The position is paid at $20.50 – $23.50/hour depending on experience (annual salary range equivalent to $37,310-$42,770), with health insurance, paid time off, and a professional development budget. We encourage BIPOC, LGBTQ+, women, and people from other underrepresented communities to apply. Learn more about the role and apply here by Feb. 15.”

Advance Social Justice & Poverty Interventions This Summer

Apply for a Privilege & Poverty National Summer Internship

The Privilege & Poverty Academic Cluster offers funded summer internships locally, and around the U.S. through its participation in the Shepherd Higher Education Consortium on Poverty.

Middlebury Deadline: Friday, January 15th

Middlebury College is one of over twenty member institutions of the Shepherd Higher Education Consortium on Poverty (SHECP), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the proliferation of poverty studies programs at colleges and universities in the U.S. Middlebury regularly sends 5-7 students to participate in this summer program. 

This opportunity is open to students in all majors and career paths. If accepted, you will be matched with an agency that fits your interests and strengths. Located in urban and rural sites, internships offer opportunities in advancing social justice and implementing poverty interventions in areas including: Community and Individual Services; Education and Youth Outreach; Health and Wellness; Immigration and Refugees; and Legal and Business Management.

The Consortium’s internship program includes eight weeks of summer fieldwork bookended by opening and closing conferences, during which student interns come together with peers from other schools (and with faculty and staff) to critically reflect on their experiences. The closing conference also includes an annual symposium on a topic important to understanding poverty.

Please consult this flyer for more information about the application process.  If you have any questions on whether your virtual service experience could qualify for funding, please reach out to Ashley Laux at alaux@middlebury.edu or (802) 443-3099.

Advance Social Justice & Poverty Interventions This Summer

Apply for a Privilege & Poverty National Summer Internship

The Privilege & Poverty Academic Cluster offers funded summer internships locally, and around the U.S. through its participation in the Shepherd Higher Education Consortium on Poverty.

Middlebury Deadline: Friday, January 15th

Middlebury College is one of over twenty member institutions of the Shepherd Higher Education Consortium on Poverty (SHECP), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the proliferation of poverty studies programs at colleges and universities in the U.S. Middlebury regularly sends 5-7 students to participate in this summer program. 

This opportunity is open to students in all majors and career paths. If accepted, you will be matched with an agency that fits your interests and strengths. Located in urban and rural sites, internships offer opportunities in advancing social justice and implementing poverty interventions in areas including: Community and Individual Services; Education and Youth Outreach; Health and Wellness; Immigration and Refugees; and Legal and Business Management.

The Consortium’s internship program includes eight weeks of summer fieldwork bookended by opening and closing conferences, during which student interns come together with peers from other schools (and with faculty and staff) to critically reflect on their experiences. The closing conference also includes an annual symposium on a topic important to understanding poverty.

Please consult this flyer for more information about the application process.  If you have any questions on whether your virtual service experience could qualify for funding, please reach out to Ashley Laux at alaux@middlebury.edu or (802) 443-3099.

Receive $10,000 in Funding for a Summer Project That Promotes Peace!

Projects for Peace is an initiative for Middlebury students to design grassroots projects that build community and address the root causes of conflict.

Watch this video with Projects for Peace grant recipient Meron Benti ’19 on how to design a successful application. Password: aQL2G=AJ

The Innovation Hub will be holding virtual office hours on November 17 at 3:30 PM EST to answer any additional questions! Email hneuwirth@middlebury.edu for the zoom information. 

The deadline to submit a project proposal is Wednesday, December 16 at 5 PM EST.

Learn more here.

Cool article from ’16.5 alum and current UVM med student Richard Brach!

Why Social Justice Belongs in Medical Education

By Richard Brach ’22, UVM College of Medicine

March 6, 2020

The well-being of a country’s children is an important measure to track, as poverty in early years can have long-lasting consequences on children’s performance in school and their adult health status. The United States is considered one of the wealthiest countries in the world, but we have childhood poverty rates that are some of the worst. When compared to other countries with similar gross domestic products in a recent State of the World’s Children Report, the United states ranked 34/35, only ahead of Romania. Things look more grim when you look at childhood poverty by race in the U.S.: one in three Native American, one in four black and Hispanic, and one in nine white children live in poverty. To get a better idea of where we stand today and how best to proceed, we need to come to terms with how we got here.

Our nation has a deep history of racism and inequality. This country was built on the backs of slaves after which decades of lynchings, Jim Crow laws, and legal harassment crushed the possibility of upward mobility for African Americans. One example: 98 percent of the $120 billion in federal home loans distributed between 1933 and 1962 went to white homeowners, excluding African Americans from economic opportunity. This kept money and power in the hands of white Americans. Even after legislation banned discrimination in housing loans in 1968, the stage of structural racism was already set, permeating every aspect of our culture. In schools, African American students are suspended and expelled three times more often than white students, which is fueling the school-to-prison pipeline and mass incarceration. There are now more African American men in prison than there were enslaved in 1850.

Health care and STEM research are not immune to these challenges. We have a dark history of subjecting marginalized communities to cruel treatment and punishments. Most people are familiar with the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments between 1932 and 1972 in which the U.S. Public Health Service knowingly withheld treatment from hundreds of African Americans that had contracted syphilis in order to study the progression of the gruesome disease. Even in Vermont, when we’re so proud of being the first state to abolish slavery, we have a racist history of eugenics, in which healthcare professionals forcibly sterilized Abenaki Indians between 1930 and 1957. We need to recognize that we, as current and future health care professionals, are just as fallible as anyone else.

2-Year Post-Grad Fellowship in Social Impact Leadership

Are you a hard worker? A person who’s excited about problem-solving, who cares deeply about community and social justice and achieving real goals? Are you a dreamer, and incredibly practical, tough, resilient and persistent?

Each year, a new cohort of FAO Schwarz Fellows begins paid two-year assignments with leading nonprofit organizations.

FELLOWS AT WORK

The Fellows work at leading nonprofit organizations in Boston, New York City and Philadelphia. These organizations are all deeply valued in their communities and have a strong record of delivering consistent results and high-quality services. Host organizations vary from year to year — and all have a proven commitment to addressing critical issues of social inequity.

What We’re Looking For

The FAO Schwarz Fellowship is an intensive, transformative two-year experience in the world of social impact that includes focused professional development. Our Fellows are highly motivated, passionate recent college graduates who are committed to social justice.

Successful candidates have proven academic excellence, demonstrated leadership in their college communities and are eager to immerse themselves in a two-year experience that will challenge them, train them and empower them with the skills and network they need to take a first step towards leadership in world of social impact.

REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must be college seniors at the time of application and be eligible to work in the United States for the duration of the Fellowship.

How To Apply

Prospective Fellows apply directly to the host organizations for the next cohort. 

Applications open each year in early November when we announce new host organizations and Fellowship positions.

Online Info Sessions

We host several online info sessions throughout the year for interested students and college advisors who want to learn more about the Fellowships. Please join us by selecting a date and registering in advance. We’ll send you call in instructions in an email.

OCTOBER 15, 2019 
3:00 – 3:45 pm EST

NOVEMBER 15, 2019
11 a.m. – 11:45 am EST

JANUARY 15, 2020 
10:00 – 10:45 am EST

REGISTER

SENIORS: Help fuel solutions rooted in social, environmental, racial & economic justice with WhyHunger JOB

WhyHunger’s US Programs team is excited to bring on a new member to help support their work in partnering with US-based movements for food justice and food sovereignty.  WhyHunger’s US Programs partners with grassroots-led networks and alliances, across the United States and Canada, implementing community-led and sustainable solutions that move us forward from exploitative and extractive social, political and economic systems to ones that are life affirming, restorative, resilient and value human dignity and the lives of all living beings and our planet. You can learn more about the entry-level position HERE on Idealist.org.

Interested candidates should submit a resume and brief cover letter, where they learned of the position, and any informational questions to whyhungerjobs@gmail.com by the deadline of May 16.

For more information about WhyHunger visit our website at https://www.whyHunger.org