The Leaders

 

Max More

Max More

Max More: born in January 1964, became a prominent leader within the movement upon the release of his 1990 essay “Transhumanism: Toward a Futurist Philosophy.” He was born in Bristol, England and attended St. Anne’s College Oxford where he earned a degree in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. In 1995 he earned his doctoral dissertation from the University of Southern California. In 1996, Max More married Natasha Vita-More, another prominent Transhumanist. Until 2007, he served as the Chairman of Extropy Institute, and since 2011 he has been the president and the CEO of Alcor Life Extension Foundation, a world leading  cryonics institute.

 

 

Natasha Vita-More

Natasha Vita-More

Natasha Vita-More: born in February 1950, she became known as the “first female philosopher of transhumanism.” Natasha Vita-More is the designer and author of “Primo Posthuman” which is a full body prototype of future humans. Vita-More received her doctorate from the University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom. She has a masters of Philosophy in Media Art & Design, a master of science in Future Studies from the University of Houston, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Memphis. Lastly, she holds certificates in sports nutrition and physical fitness from the American Muscle and Fitness Association. In 1993, Vita-More authored the “Transhuman Manifesto.” Vita-More is currently a fellow of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies as well as the chairman of the board of directors of Humanity Plus.

 

135px-FM2030FM-2030: Fereidoun M. Esfandiary was born October 1930 and was an author and Transhumanist philosopher. He became a notable Transhumanist when his book Are You a Transhuman?: Monitoring and Stimulating Your Personal Rate of Growth in a Rapidly Changing World, was published in 1989. He was the son of an Iranian diplomat, and lived in 17 different countries by the time that he reached 11 years old. (Fun Fact: he was on the Iranian olympic basketball team in 1948 Olympic Games.) In the mid-1970s, he changed his name to FM-2030 for two main reasons: (1.) to reflect his deep desire to live until his 100th birthday, and (2.) to breakfree of the traditional naming convention at birth. FM-2030 died in 2000 from cancer, but his body was placed in cryonics in the hope that the technology to bring his back ot life is right around the corner. He taught at the New School, UCLA, and Florida Internatiional University.

 

imgres-2Nick Bostrom: was born in March 1973 and grew up in Sweden. He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics. He is currently the director of the Future of Humanity Institute and the Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology at Oxford University.





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