Job at CSIS in DC using Chinese skills

This came across my desk, referred by a Midd faculty member.  Get in touch and I can tell you more if interested.

Program Manager & Research Associate – China Power Project.  The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) is a non-profit, bipartisan public policy organization established in 1962 to provide strategic insights and practical policy solutions to decision makers concerned with global security and prosperity. Over the years, it has grown to be one of the largest organizations of its kind, with a staff of some 200 employees, including more than 120 analysts working to address the changing dynamics of international security across the globe.

The primary purpose of this position is to provide substantive, administrative, and logistical support to the Director of the China Power Project. The RA/PC is responsible for taking the lead in all program components, including: managing administrative and logistical tasks; assisting with program development; contributing to the program’s research agenda; and providing budgetary support. The RA/PC serves as the first point of contact for communications outside CSIS and liaises with CSIS operational departments.

More details and application information here:  https://csis-openhire.silkroad.com/epostings/index.cfm?fuseaction=app.jobInfo&version=1&jobid=225

Information about the China Power Project here:  https://www.csis.org/people/bonnie-s-glaser

 

Armstrong Treasure Hunt: Quadrant Electrometer

Written by Mike Lally ’18

While organizing and cataloging the Science Antiques Collection Wendy and I came across a wooden box, standing about a 18 inches high and 10 inches deep.

Elliot’s Quadrant Electrometer

Inside was a mechanism that appeared to be a brass structure inside what can only be described as a birdcage. The item slides out of its carrying case on a wooden platform, which can be removed and the piece therefore is able to be lifted out of its home.
This is a Quadrant Electrometer, made by Elliott Bros. of London in the 1880s. It is a form of an electroscope, which allows more absolute measures of electrostatic potentials. This measures the presence and magnitude of a charge. When a device is attached to the contacts at the base of the machine, the needle floating inside points to the magnitude of the potential.
This machine would have been used within a classroom setting, with students learning about electrostatics. Additionally, the aesthetic qualities of this object indicate that along with its practical use, an artistic use emerges as well. One can imagine such a machine sitting in the parlor room in the late nineteenth century, guests staring at the item while its proud owner explains the machines use and provenance, yet admiring the beauty of object.
This and more aesthetically pleasing scientific instruments can be found in the 5th floor display in Bicentennial Hall.

Why would anyone want to major in STEM?

It turns out many STEM students want to change the world, not just make money.

In 2012, the United States made it a national priority to increase the number of undergraduate degrees awarded in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by at least 1 million over the next decade in order to meet expected growth in those industries. In turn, many colleges and universities have bolstered their efforts to raise the number of students they enroll and graduate in STEM majors. For educators and policymakers, it seems a no-brainer to urge students into STEM given the high demand and attractive salaries in those fields. But increasing the number of STEM graduates is no simple task.

Read the full Psychology Today article by Ross E. O’Hara Ph.D.

Work in International Affairs. Explore what it at means!

The Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) is a great resource with a job board, graduate school information and tons of information about opportunities in the public, non-profit and private sectors, along with details about subject areas like human rights and international law, conflict resolution, development and relief, education, and more.

Explore it all here: https://apsia.org/

Midd/MIIS Travelers

The following employees have reported upcoming travel between Midd and MIIS:

From Midd to MIIS From MIIS to Midd
Dima Ayoub, Arabic

Aug 7-8

Shirley Coly, Advancement

June 19-22

Hannah Ross, General Counsel

Week of July 10

Renee Jourdenais, GSTILE

July 5-12

Karen Miller, Vice President for HR and Chief Risk Officer

Week of August 14

Amy McGill, Office of the Institute VP

July 11-14

Susan Baldridge, Provost

Week of August 21

Andrea Hofmann-Miller, GSTILE-T&I  July
Fariha Haque, Middlebury in DC

Week of August 21

Julie Johnson, GSTILE

July 21-August 5

Roman Graf, German/Commons Office – Brainerd

Oct 19-23

Jill Stoffers, Recruiting

July

Sarah Stroup, Political Science

Oct 19-23

Maureen Anda, MIIS Alumni Relations Office

August

Bill McKibben, Environmental Studies

Oct 31-Nov 4

Maggie Peters,  MIIS Alumni Relations Office

August

Sue Halpern, English & American Literatures

Oct 31-Nov 4

Leah Gowron,  MIIS Alumni Relations Office

August

Cris Silva, GSTILE-T&I

Summer

Blog Posts from the Office of Digital Learning: Study Abroad Contest, What’s the Story, Critical Instructional Design, Summer Intern Update, and More!

Check out the latest blog posts from the Office of Digital Learning:

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Pass for Echo and Vermont State Historic Sites available at Davis Library

Take a mini-vacation to visit Vermont historic sites that stretch the length of the state. Ranging from prehistoric encampments, to pivotal Revolutionary War sites, to the homes of U.S. presidents, Vermont’s historic sites chronicle the development of a state, its people, and the nation around it. Explore backroads and byways to discover Vermont’s history.

The Circulation Desk at Davis Family Library offers a three-day pass to college staff, faculty and students.

Additionally, we have a three-day ECHO Pass on the waterfront in Burlington. Up to two adults and three youths will be admitted to the ECHO Lake Aquarium & Science Center, at the Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, for just $2.00 each.