Pre-Med Students: Don’t Miss the Medical School Applicant Panel and MCAT Peer Advice Panel 1/16

The Health Professions and STEM team is excited to welcome a panel of recent Middlebury College medical school applicants back to campus. Come hear about the application process from students who just went through the cycle. Ask them questions about the interview process (traditional and Multiple Mini Interviews or MMI) and find out what they wish they had known before applying to medical school.

You’ll also hear from a group of your peers who took the MCATs this past summer. We’ll ask them to share their study schedules, what materials they found useful, what tricks and tips they found to be helpful and test-day strategies.

What a great opportunity to hear about the application process from those who have just gone through it!

When: Tuesday, January 16 from 6:00-8:00 pm
Where: Hillcrest 103

Pizza will be provided!

CHANGE IN PAYROLL DEADLINE FOR THE LAST PAYROLL OF 2017 – MONTEREY (CB26)

The Institute will be closed for the December break beginning at 5:01pm on Friday, December 22, 2017 and will end at 11:59pm on Monday, January 1, 2018. The following change has been made to the time entry and time approval deadline.

  • Deadline for submitting AND approving time – Friday, 12/15/17 at NOON (12:00pm)
    • Remember to submit your time prior to NOON to allow supervisors adequate time to approve timesheets; please note, the pay period is 12/11/17-12/24/17 and may include some Holiday time.
    • Non-exempt employees must record December 22nd 5:01 pm through 11:59 pm January 1st as “Holiday.”  Exempt employees do not need to record Holiday hours this period.

Due to the Institute being closed on Friday, 12/29/17, your paycheck for CB26 (check date 12/29/17) will be available for pickup at the following location:

Where: Security Hut behind the Admissions building (Lara Soto Adobe Building.)

When: Any time after 8:30AM; if no one is in the Hut, please use the blue phone to call security and someone will come and give you your check. Please be prepared to show a photo ID.

Please note that 12/29/17 is not a federal holiday and banks will be open. If you have questions regarding the paycheck pickup location or hours, please contact Steve Marino smarino@miis.edu; if you have other questions regarding your paycheck, please contact the Payroll Office in Middlebury payroll@middlebury.edu.

*Sign up for direct deposit now at go/payroll/direct deposit

Please inform all your staff of this change in the payroll schedule

Payroll/Human Resources

TIAA ONE-ON-ONE COUNSELING SESSIONS WITH ERIK MOREAU

tiaa_logo

 

January – March, 2018

 

  • Thursday January 4, Marble Works, 152 Maple Street, Suite 203
  • Wednesday January 10, Davis Library, Room 150D
  • Thursday January 18, Davis Library, Room 150D
  • Tuesday January 30, Marble Works, 152 Maple Street, Suite 203
  • Thursday February 8 , Davis Library, Room 150D
  • Wednesday February 14, Marble Works, 152 Maple Street, Suite 203
  • Thursday February 22, Davis Library, Room 150D
  • Tuesday March 6, Davis Library, Room 150D
  • Thursday March 15 Davis Library, Room 150D
  • Wednesday March 21, Marble Works, 152 Maple Street, Suite 203

To schedule an appointment with Erik Moreau, please call the Field Support Team at (800) 732-8353, M-F 8am – 8pm (EST) or register for one of the sessions at www.tiaa.org/schedulenow .

Interlibrary Loan Winter Break Service Update – 2017

Due to the holidays, shipping madness, the increased risk of losses, and the lack of open libraries willing to send things, the Interlibrary Loan Department limits ordering and shipping during the second half of December.

If you need anything before winter break request it now!  Interlibrary loan requests submitted to ILLiad after Dec. 15th will be ordered in early January.

ILLiad article requests will continue to be filled by RapidILL through Dec. 22st, but requests must have a valid ISSN and year to be processed by Rapid.

Use Worldcat to find your citations and submit your loan requests!

 

New podcast asks “What is Vermont music?” with Special Collections’ Rebekah Irwin



Listen to our favorite new podcast, Before Your Time, presented by the Vermont Historical Society and the Vermont Humanities Council, and edited and distributed by VTDigger.

Episode two, A Green Mountain Mixtape explores Vermont music and the questions musical traditions raise about Vermont identity. Director and Curator of Special Collections Rebekah Irwin discusses a pioneer in folk life preservation, Helen Hartness Flanders, who recorded Vermonters singing traditional folk ballads passed down from one generation to the next.

In her quest to preserve the past, Flanders utilized emerging sound recording technologies, starting with wax cylinders, then aluminum discs, vinyl LP’s, and reel-to-reel tapes, formats that today represent the history of recording technology.

 

Episode one, Vermont’s Great Flood features Nick Clifford, professor emeritus at Middlebury College. He and his wife Deborah Clifford wrote a book on the 1927 flood called The Troubled Roar of the Waters.

Enjoy!

 

New podcast asks “What is Vermont music?” with Special Collections’ Rebekah Irwin



Listen to our favorite new podcast, Before Your Time, presented by the Vermont Historical Society and the Vermont Humanities Council, and edited and distributed by VTDigger.

Episode two, A Green Mountain Mixtape explores Vermont music and the questions musical traditions raise about Vermont identity. Director and Curator of Special Collections Rebekah Irwin discusses a pioneer in folk life preservation, Helen Hartness Flanders, who recorded Vermonters singing traditional folk ballads passed down from one generation to the next.

In her quest to preserve the past, Flanders utilized emerging sound recording technologies, starting with wax cylinders, then aluminum discs, vinyl LP’s, and reel-to-reel tapes, formats that today represent the history of recording technology.

 

Episode one, Vermont’s Great Flood features Nick Clifford, professor emeritus at Middlebury College. He and his wife Deborah Clifford wrote a book on the 1927 flood called The Troubled Roar of the Waters.

Enjoy!

 

Antiprincesas Xalapa 2017: Art, Play, and Social Change by Chi Chi Chang

This summer, I collaborated with Colectivo Akelarre, a feminist collective, and local artists to organize an arts and feminism camp called Antiprincesas for girls 14-19 years old in Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico.  I studied abroad in Xalapa my spring semester, and thanks to funding from Midd’s Center for Careers and Internships, I was able to stay the summer and work with this collective.

From July 18th-22nd, 22 girls participated in this week-long camp of discussion, reflection, art, and community-building.  I opened each day with a warm-up, meditation, and interactive activities to cover the theme of the program How do we learn gender, Body, Representation, and Social Problems.  In the afternoons, there were workshops from local artists (Voice/Body/Improvisation, Theater of the Oppressed, Film and Intersectionality through Drag Culture, etc.) and guest speakers (a sexologist, the director of the Institute of Women of Xalapa, a feminist human rights lawyer).  We also included free time for the girls to read, collage, make zines, and hang out with each other.  The final day, the group self-organized a final presentation for friends and family.

 

We started each day with a warmup, meditation, and breathing techniques for stress/anxiety. Here we are practicing belly-breathing

 

In Abril’s theater workshop, the girls improvised scenes from the perspective of gender.

 

 

In Jimena’s workshop, the girls talked about self-care (auto-cuidado), self-defense, and self-esteem and worked in breakout groups to present on their topic.

 

Fatima (on the harp) and Juana Itzel (reciting her feminist “decimas”, or poems) practicing for the final presentation the group self-organized and directed.

 

From the beginning, we had five principal intentions for this project.

  • Definition of Feminism. Rather than impose our own ideologies, we wanted to create a space for the girls to share their experiences to reflect and learn from each other–to draw from the collective wisdom in the room.
  • Collaboration and Diversity. The team of organizers and artists that worked on this project hold different political views and facilitation styles.  The girls as well were a group of different ages, interests, and cultural backgrounds.  This diversity and acceptance of difference allowed for deeper understanding.
  • Corporal Understanding. We wanted to place importance on the body and on emotions as ways of connection and understanding.
  • Art as Fundamental to Social Change. We believe art allows us to question our surroundings, gives us a voice to express ourselves, and invites collaboration and co-creation.
  • Community Building. More than anything, we wanted to create an intentional community of acceptance of difference, of care, and of love.

When I proposed the camp to the collective, I had a vision for the project based on the above intentions and my experience with JusTalks, MiddSafe, Raisins (Radical Asians), Stairs n Stares (performance dance installation on sexual assault), and various dance projects at Middlebury.  These experiences at Midd gave me practice building spaces of open and honest dialogue, self and communal reflection on power, privilege, and identity, and of using art as a form of social change.

But what makes this camp special was that it was a collaborative project.  The distinct artistic/feminist backgrounds of the local artists and women of Colectivo Akelarre allowed us to share our knowledge and co-create this project. This means that even after I left, the structure and vision of the camp remained, as well as the personal connections formed among the organizers and the first generation of antiprincesas.  I look forward to hearing about future iterations of this camp, even if I will not be able to be part of the planning process.

It was an honor and a joy to grow with and from my fellow collaborators and the group of girls.  From this project, I realized the importance of care and open and honest communication during the process of creation.  I learned that spaces of play allow for greater trust, vulnerability, and togetherness.  This project also reaffirmed my belief in the power of empathic listening to open spaces of connection and of acceptance of multiple truths.  And finally, witnessing the transformation of the girls from timid individuals to a united, loving, and empowered group of young women re-ignited a hope, an energy, and a revolutionary spirit in me sometimes stifled in the world of academia.

 

The first generation of anti-princesas.

 

I want to thank Community Engagement and the Cross Cultural Community Service Fund that made this project possible.  The funding not only allowed for the girls to participate for free, it also paid for transportation and meals for three girls who came from outside Xalapa (their housing was taken care of by Colectivo Akelarre).

Here is a 5-minute video documenting the week:

 

 

Here is our Mannequin Challenge Activity from Day 4:

Here are links to some press from when we were accepting applications pre-camp:

You can follow Colectivo Akelarre on Facebook.