Weekly Web Updates – October 16, 2017

If you had been using the Jetpack and The Events Calendar plugins in WordPress simultaneously, you may not have been able to set event venues properly in the editing interface. This issue is now resolved.

Updates

Fixes and Tweaks

Ongoing Work

  • Creating a new website for the Middlebury Institute of International Studies.
  • Creating a new automatically generated course catalog.
  • Building out the configuration of our CAS servers in Chef, which is a configuration management system. We have already completed this work for our Drupal, WordPress, MediaWiki, GO, Omeka, and the Course Catalog services.
  • Upgrading the Drupal sites for the Davis programs, Dining Menus, and Museum of Art to Drupal 8.

Latin Poetry (Trial through Nov. 11)

Until November 11th, Middlebury faculty, students, and staff have free access to Oxford Scholarly Editions – Latin Poetry. (To find content, search or browse and then limit to Middlebury’s access as shown in the screenshot at the bottom of this post.)

This access includes the use of the Oxford Latin Dictionary widget. If you come across a word or phrase you are not familiar with, highlight it and a menu appears:

Choose Oxford Latin Dictionary and see the results!

Try it out and let us know what you think. Email eaccess-admin@middlebury.edu or contact your liaison.

 

Screenshot showing texts limited to Middlebury:

The 44% and Why They Matter to Inspiring More Women in Tech

It’s something that is discussed a lot in the industry, and rightfully so, but I think we are missing another important question: What about the 44% of women who stay in tech?

Great post by Julie Elberfeld, Senior Vice President, Shared Technology and Executive Sponsor of Diversity and Inclusion for Technology, Capital One

“My mantra remains: technology is all about finding solutions, and that’s what women do best — we solve problems.”

Read the full Medium article here.

Emails do matter!

Whether you are currently applying to jobs and internships, or will be in the next couple months, you are sure to be sending out a lot of emails. After all the work you’ll put into crafting strong resumes and letters, you want to be sure that your emails reflect this same professionalism. Emails do matter!

An email is one of your first impressions to a potential employer. It is your opportunity to show off your professionalism, your maturity, and your serious interest in the position. Emails give the employer some small insight into what it’s like to interact with you as a person. While proper email etiquette is not going to get you the job, improper etiquette will turnoff the employer and hurt your job chances.

When responding to employer emails, the old dating rule “wait three days” does not apply. You’re not trying to play it “cool” and avoid coming off as “desperate.” Slow responses signal to employers that you’re not that interested. They might not waste time waiting for your response when they have a pool of other qualified candidates. In addition, waiting for your answer might irritate an interviewer. Therefore, it’s good practice to respond to emails within 24 hours. Responding and saying that you were “really busy”, is not an excuse. The potential employer is busy too, and this excuse may make them question your ability to handle the workload at their company along with various responsibilities of the job. Use your quick response time to indicate to the employer that you consider this job a top priority.

When job and internship searching over email, using professional etiquette may encourage the potential employer to take you seriously and actually read the email. Use a professional email, not your soccerchick@hotmail.com account.  Address the individual by their appropriate title (Ms., Mr., Dr., etc), write a clear subject line, and use proper grammar. Be positive, polite, and concise, but be sure to include the relevant information. If it has not already been stated that the employer would like a cover letter and resume, ask for permission to include the documents with the email. Attach your cover letter and resume, each as their own PDF, and clearly labeled with your last name (Smith_Resume). Do not paste your cover letter into the body of the email. Last, absolutely NO emoticons, no matter how perfectly the “high-five” captures your feelings about the job.

Here’s an example of what your email should NOT look like:

Here’s an example of what it should look like:

Lastly, re-read your email before you send it!
For more information on how to write emails, check out this helpful article in the balance.

Caroline  Jaschke ’18 is a Peer Career Advisor at the CCI and a double majoring in English and Neuroscience. In her role, she helps students develop resumes and cover letters, prepare for interviews, and access helpful job and internship search resources such as Handshake.

 

Trending Questions: How should I start?

Trending Questions“I have to write a research paper. How should I start?”

We’re hearing this question a lot these days, and we aren’t surprised. The librarians at the Research Desk have helped many students begin working on research papers — and the process is a little different every time. Depending on the assignment (how long is the paper? what are the requirements and goals? when is it due?), the topic, and the prep work you’ve done already, we might suggest beginning in Summon, or MIDCAT, or… on a sheet of notebook paper where you’ll jot down a few keywords to get the thoughts flowing.

If this trending question has been on your mind lately too, go ahead and ask a librarian! Find us at the Research Desk in the Davis Family Library, behind the Circulation Desk at the Armstrong Library, or online at go/askus/.

Featured Consulting Opportunities in Handshake

Five of my favorite CONSULTING internships: (there are 34 internships in Handshake now with job function ‘consulting’)

Jobs I Like! There are 79 opportunities in Handshake now with job function ‘consulting’. Here are just a few:

Check out these great programs at Proctor & Gamble:

Columbia Law School visit on Tuesday

Join us Tuesday, October 17 at 6pm in Coltraine in ADK.

Applying to law school is an exciting and contemplative experience, but distinguishing among law schools can be overwhelming. We invite you to a special information session to speak with Natalie R. Blazer, Esq., Associate Director of Admissions and Strategic Initiatives Recruiter at Columbia Law School, about the application components, admissions process, curriculum, student life, and the many resources available to you at the Law School as you navigate your way through a legal education. There will be a presentation followed by Q&A, and all class years and majors are welcome. You do not need to be applying for the 2017-2018 cycle in order to attend. We look forward to connecting with you!