Tag Archives: Special Collections

Special Collections sponsors new exhibit : The Two Pointers of Dead Creek — A Tradition of Trapping and Boat Building in Addison County

In collaboration with Vergennes boat builder Douglas Brooks, Special Collections is offering a new short-term exhibit The Two Pointers of Dead Creek : A Tradition of Trapping and Boat Building in Addison County.  Assistant Curator Danielle Rougeau is working with Douglas Brooks on mounting the exhibit on the Lower Level of the Davis Family Library. The exhibit officially opens on Wednesday, September 1, 2010, and will be on view through Friday, October 1.

During the 2009-2010 academic year, Brooks and three Middlebury College students, Renee Igo ’11, Christian Woodard ’11 and Ben Meader ’10.5, interviewed trappers and their descendants in an effort to document the culture of muskrat trapping in Addison County, with an emphasis on the “two pointers”, the double-ended boats that trappers built.

After a training program with the Vermont Folklife Center, the researchers began recording interviews and examining historic boats. Over twenty historic trapping boats were identified in the region.  Eventually several boats were carefully measured and one was chosen for replication. The students displayed an historic boat at the 2010 Middlebury College Student Research Symposium.

In the 2010 spring semester, Igo, Woodard, and Meader, guided by Brooks, built this trapping boat in studio space at Middlebury’s Old Stone Mill. The boat was launched on Commencement day, May 27, 2010.    

LIS Collection Management has a new name!

With the merger of Collection Management and portions of Academic Consulting Services, it became clear that the area needed a new name to reflect its expanded scope.

I’m therefore pleased to announce that the name for this area is now Research and Collection Services (RCS). While many portions of the website still reflect the old names — and it will take a while before we’ve eradicated all remnants of Collection Management/Academic Consulting Services from the website, email distribution lists, HR/Banner information, etc. — please consider the name to be effective immediately.  We’ll try to get the changes made expeditiously.

As a reminder, RCS includes:

  • Reference and Instruction Librarians
  • Special Collections
  • Vt. Collection
  • Government Documents
  • Inter-library Loan
  • Cataloging/Acquisitions/Serials
  • Preservation & Processing
  • Collection Development

Library Hours

clockAll Midd Libraries begin 9 – 5 hours today.

Library hours are reduced during the period between spring and summer semesters. Check here for hours.

PLEASE NOTE! The Libraries will close at 12 noon on Monday 5/24.

Special Collections will be closed Monday 5/24 through Friday 6/4; opening Saturday 6/5 from 10-2 for Reunion weekend, and resuming regular hours Monday 6/7.

Library Hours for Spring Break

library hoursA reminder that Library hours will change for the Spring break period 3/19 – 28.
Please check hours here.

Main Library
Friday 3/19 7:30 am – 8 pm
Saturday – Sunday 3/20 – 21 9 am – 5 pm
Mon – Fri 3/22 – 26 9 am – 5 pm
Saturday 3/27 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday 3/28 – resume regular hours 9 am – 1 am

Music Library
Friday 3/19 9 am – 5 pm
Saturday – Sunday 3/20 – 21 CLOSED
Mon – Fri 3/22 – 26 9 am – 5 pm
Saturday 3/27 CLOSED
Sunday 3/28 CLOSED

Armstrong Library
Friday 3/19 7:45 am – 5 pm
Saturday – Sunday 3/20 – 21 CLOSED
Mon – Fri 3/22 – 26 9 am – 5 pm
Saturday 3/27 CLOSED
Sunday 3/28 4 pm – 12 midnight

Special Collections
Friday 3/19 1 pm-5 pm
Saturday – Sunday 3/20 – 21 CLOSED
Mon – Fri 3/22 – 26 CLOSED
Saturday 3/27 CLOSED
Sunday 3/28 7 pm-10pm

Exhibit: Frances Dee and the Commodification of the Hollywood Star

Submitted by Brenda Ellis

Axinn Center Winter Garden continuing through August 31st.

Description:

The process of commodification required the frequent reworking of promotional materials devoted to extending a film and its stars pervasively into the public sphere. This exhibit offers more than one hundred representative materials employed by Hollywood studios in marketing not only her films but actress Frances Dee as a star. They include the most common items — posters, lobby cards, photographs, press books, heralds, fan magazines, etc. — to the more obscure — cigarette cards, matchbooks, photoplay editions of novels, film novelizations in magazine format, study guides, playing cards, makeup kits, Coca-Cola trays, dress patterns, and paper dolls. In selecting these materials, a conscious effort has been made to document that Hollywood marketing campaigns were aimed not solely to American filmgoers but to a vast international audience, from Europe to Asia to Latin and South America, who eagerly consumed Hollywood films and their stars.