Author Archives: Wendy Shook

Friday Links – September 13

Elon Musk Unveils His Vision For ‘The Future of Design’ With Hand Manipulated Holographic Technology – Tesla CEO Elon Musk (who we could safely call a futurist at this, can’t we?) has more on his mind that just cars and 4,000 MPH Hyperloop transportation systems. He also tweeted his intention of developing a hand-manipulated hologram design engine and promised to post a video of designing a rocket part with only hand gestures and printing the part in titanium.

 

 

Looking for inspiration?  Voyager 1, launched in 1977, has crossed the heliopause and is still sending back data: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/voyager20130912.html#.UjNUKH_3Mg8

Friday Links – August 23, 2013

No more “20% time” at Google – “Google’s “20% time,” which allows employees to take one day a week to work on side projects, effectively no longer exists. That’s according to former Google employees, one who spoke to Quartz on the condition of anonymity and others who have said it publicly.”

Increasing public access to federally funded research – This is not new, but for researchers and data nerds alike it is worth reading again – and following developments! You can find the official memo here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/ostp_public_access_memo_2013.pdf

A tiny book!  – from University of Iowa Libraries Special Collections.
Rosen, Rebecca J. “Revealed: A Book the Size of a Ladybug.” The Atlantic. 7 Aug. 2013. Web. 22 Aug. 2013.

The Getty launches Open Content Images: 4,687 images from their collection are now available for free use under their open content license.

WebKit Has Implemented srcset: Right now there’s no good way to switch the image in an HTML <img> tag for a different browser (for example, giving a smaller image to a mobile browser). The srcset attribute solves most of the issues with this. See also: Mat’s talk on the subject.

QR Codes vs. URLs. In related news, Microsoft Tag is shutting down. Did you even know that Microsoft Tag existed?

Internet Trends 2013  InternetDog

 

 

 

 

Friday Links – May 31

Emdbedding Digital Literacies and enabling change – Report form the “Changing the Learning Landscape” London Event

The Internet of Things – The Internet of Things has emerged as one of IT’s hottest trends of 2013. We have a great set of resources to help you figure out how it can help your business.

Why is Science Behind a Paywall? – The evolution of and economics behind the current model of scholarly communications.

What’s new in MOOCs? “Coursera is recasting itself as a platform for credit-bearing courses that would be offered to students enrolled at multiple campuses within a public-university system.”

Staff matters. “Another side-effect of the executive belief that ‘life is elsewhere’ is that staff members aren’t utilized in transformational efforts. In the pigeonholing that can take place between HR and executive leaders, staff can be overlooked.”

Research Data Managment Implemenation Workshop, March 2013

A Research Data Management Implementation Workshop was held on March 13-14, 2013, with Alison Darrow (SRO) and Wendy Shook (LIS) attending selected webcasts.

SELECT * FROM rdminotes WHERE comment != ‘soapbox’

Take away points:

  • There is a lot of energy behind data management, and many good standards and tools being developed, but the field is in a constant state of flux.
  • Despite that energy, there is significant frustration.  Funding agencies are providing objective outcomes, but not implementation guidance.  They are waiting to see what consensus comes from the field, while users and providers are looking for some kind of direction or expectation from funding agencies to get them started. (I’d like to point out that this is a tremendous opportunity for the data management community to contribute to standards and best practices!)
  • There is emphasis on big data, in part due to volumes produced and dollars consumed, but that emphasis leaves smaller implementations feeling isolated, even though small data are valuable assets that require as much attention as big data do.
  • A variety of data management models were discussed, each with staunch proponents, but I expect the reality to be custom approaches taking the most useful element of each model.

An excellent collection of position papers are available at https://rdmi.uchicago.edu/page/submitted-experience-and-position-papers

 

Oberlin Group of 17 Digital Library Unconference

The Oberlin Group of 17 Digital Library Unconference was held on May 21, 2013, at Mt. Holyoke College.  With over 30 participants from 14 of the OG17 schools, there was lively discussion on topics including digital library planning and scope, organization and staffing, platforms and tools, data management and preservation policy, digital scholarship/digital humanities, outreach, and archiving born-digital records.

The format of the meeting eschewed the traditional speaker followed by a few questions in favour of a lightning round describing current projects at representated colleges, then brainstorming topics to be further discussed in a series of “break-out” sessions. The format felt more collaborative and productive than simply presenting information.   Discussions were deemed successful enough to warrant follow-up meetings.

Attendees from Middlebury: Wendy Shook, Rebekah Irwin, Bryan Carson.

ACRL Digital Curation Webinar: Creation of an In-House DMP Tool

ACRL Digital Curation Interest Group Webinar: Creation of an In-House DMP Tool at the University of Houston Libraries, April 18, 2013

Michele Reilly and Anita Dryden from the University of Houston discussed their approach to providing data management planning assistance to their research faculty.  Data management is not part of their mission; they focus on providing both general and UH resource specific information via their library web pages and by the creation of a data management planning (DMP) Tool.  This tool, created using drupal webforms, is similar to the California Digital Library’s DMPTool and the Digital Curation Centre’s DMPOnline. Although offering fewer features, the UH tool pre-dates the online tools mentioned, has been easy to maintain and customize, and has been sufficient to fulfill the needs of their researchers.

Friday Links – May 17th

Markham Nolan: How to separate fact and fiction online | Video on TED.com

~13 minute video talk by a journalist showing how news organizations verify information posted by users on the web (tweets, photos, videos) using technology such as Google Earth, etc.

How to Read a Book

Did you find an odd box with pieces of paper inside? It might be a book! Some of them still have real pages—and I’ll show you just how to read one.

The Business Value of Google Glass and Wearable Computing – Wearable computing is an emerging technology that’s affecting both the consumer and enterprise space.

Predatory Publishers Strike Back
Predatory publishing is what happens when open access publishing is subverted by manipulation, exploitation, and spammer mentality. Jeffery Beall is a librarian who uses his blog to expose predatory publishers, and they would rather he didn’t. Beall has written a Nature column piece  about predatory publishing, and his blog is Scholarly Open Access.