Author Archives: Arabella Holzapfel

Friday Links – February 14, 2014

The return-on-investment of reading from Forbes, or Why you should read books

Vermonter Bryan Alexander of NITLE “goes” to Educause via Doppelbot.

Cute and humorous video about data sharing, management, and preservation from the NYU Health Sciences Libraries –

He Said She Said – How Blogs are Changing the Scientific Discourse – Mainstream media always follows the same kind of ‘He said, she said’ template, which is why even climate change deniers get their say, although they are a tiny minority. The leading scientific journals, on the other hand, are expensive and behind pay-walls. But it turns out there are places on the web where you can follow science up close and personal: The many personal blogs written by scientists — and the conversation there is changing the very nature of scientific debate.

Cloudinary vs. Blitline: Cloud-Image Services Compared – As Web applications grow in number and capability, storing large amounts of images can quickly become a problem.

Did you ever wish you were an Olympian? Check out these interactive elements from the New York Times to get close to the action from miles away. (Thanks to our digital media tutors for this find!!)

Friday Links – February 7, 2014

10 ways alternative energy is about to change the way tech gets powered – Solar-powered laptops, edible battery power, spray-on solar panels, mini windmills: This may be a game-changing year for clean technology.

Solar Powered LapTop

Apple was just awarded a patent for a possible solar-powered MacBook display. Image: Apple/USPTO

 

Microsoft Names Satya Nadella Its New CEO: Nadella is the third CEO of Microsoft, and is expected to continue developing its cloud services.

BuzzFeed Style Guide: If you’ve ever wondered about style guidelines for the “language of the web,” Buzzfeed specifies writing google in all lowercase when used as a verb, inserting a hyphen in live-tweet, and writing smartphone as one word.

Two perspectives on how a scholarly journal – Cultural Anthropology – goes open access: “The PR side” from the Chronicle, and a deeper exploration of the economics and philosophy from Scholarly Kitchen.

SAGE Research Methods Online (trial ends February 28, 2014)

Students, faculty, and staff at the Monterey Institute for International Studies and at Middlebury College now have trial access to SAGE Research Methods Online

a research methods tool created to help researchers, faculty and students with their research projects. SAGE Research Methods links over 175,000 pages of SAGE’s renowned book, journal and reference content with truly advanced search and discovery tools. Researchers can explore methods concepts to help them design research projects, understand particular methods or identify a new method, conduct their research, and write up their findings. Since SAGE Research Methods focuses on methodology rather than disciplines, it can be used across the social sciences, health sciences, and more.

Let us know what you think – email eaccess@middlebury.edu at Middlebury, or Ann Flower at MIIS, or your liaison.

Psychological Experiments Online (trial ends March 28, 2014)

Middlebury College students, faculty, and staff have full access Psychological Experiments Online through March 28th.

Psychological Experiments Online pairs audio and video recordings of quintessential experiments in psychology with thousands of pages of primary-source documents. It also includes notes from experiment participants, journal articles, books, field notes, and final reports in topics from obedience to authority and conformity to operant conditioning.

Let us know what you think! Send feedback to eaccess-admin@middlebury.edu or your liaison.

Business Monitor International (trial ends February 20th)

Students, faculty and staff at the Monterey Institute for International Studies have had full access to Business Monitor International since 2005. BMI provides daily reports from their experts around the world containing information and data on topics ranging from infrastructure to business environments to industry trends and political risks, country by country.

Look it over and help us determine if we should also provide access to you and your colleagues and peers at Middlebury. Let us know what you think – email eaccess-admin@middlebury.edu or your liaison.

 

Oxford Bibliographies Online (trial ends Feb. 21, 2014)

We have trial access to Oxford Bibliographies Online, (OBO) now with a new platform, better interface and other improvements since our previous trial of this resource in October 2011.

Developed cooperatively with scholars and librarians worldwide, Oxford Bibliographies offers exclusive, authoritative research guides.

Let us know what you think – email eaccess-admin@middlebury.edu or your liaison.

Friday Links – January 17, 2014

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Medicine) becomes … STEAM?

Pew Internet & American Life Project reports on escalating use of e-books. “The proportion of Americans who read e-books is growing, but few have completely replaced print books for electronic versions.”

Yale Students made a better version of its Course Catalog. Then Yale shut it down.

The Wikimedia Foundation’s multimedia team seeks community guidance on whether or not to support the MP4 video file format on Wikimedia projects.

MapGive – Open Mapping from the US State Department.

The latest version of Chrome will tell you which browser tabs are playing sound or using your webcam.

Adobe Adds 3D Printing Tools to Photoshop - Before 3D printers crank out objects, a user needs digital model — either one they create or download from the Internet. Once you’ve got one, though, you’ll need software that supports 3D imagery if you want to edit it. As of today, Photoshop users can design, edit and customize those 3D models similar to how you might adjust a 2D picture within the app.

10 things I DON’T miss about old technology – The good old days of 1980s technology weren’t always good. Read about 10 things few (if any) people will miss about that era.

Watch/ Read: Governor Shumlin’s 2014 Governor’s Budget Address – Delivered by Governor Peter Shumlin to the Vermont Legislature on January 15, 2014

Friday Links – January 10, 2014

Hmmmm…it’s pretty snazzy looking but how do I know if I should I trust that infographic? Fast Company has some good tips here.  (Spoiler alert: the article title is “Infographics Lie. Here’s How to Spot the B.S.”)

Interested in a story for everyone? Check out the Big History Project and “explore 13.7 billion years of shared history…”

Speaking of stories – the New York Times has compiled “2013: The Year in Interactive Storytelling” Be sure to scroll down to view the Explanatory Graphics section. You can learn about the Higgs Boson or untangle the fast choreography of a successful field goal on the football field.

How do the Digital Humanities translate to the classroom? The Chronicle spotlights UCLA and Emory in “How the Humanities Compute in the Classroom”.

How many times do people switch devices in an hour? Quite a few, according to a UK study.