Human Rights Studies Online (trial ends March 20, 2015)

Through March 20th, students, faculty, and staff affiliated with both Middlebury College and the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey will have trial access to a Human Rights Studies Online – a research and learning database providing comparative documentation, analysis, and interpretation of major human rights violations and atrocity crimes worldwide from 1900 to 2010. This collection includes primary and secondary materials in multiple media types.HRSOLook it over and let us know what you think! Email your feedback to eaccess-admin@middlebury.edu or your liaison.

If there’s something you’d like the library to explore or purchase, let us know at go/requests.

 

New Button Appearing in Your NExpress Search – Now Live!

Thanks to an agreement with ConnectNY we have expanded our direct request borrowing options beyond the NExpress consortium. Both systems retain separate databases; records aren’t shared between catalogs, rather searches are transferred from one system to another.  (Which means each catalog must be searched separately for the item you are interested in.)

If you don’t find what you are looking for in the NExpress catalog, there will be a button (like this:)  Connect NY search button  to search for the item in the ConnectNY Catalog. If the item is found in ConnectNY, you can now request the item, just as you would place a request in the NExpress system.

Connect NY button in a NExpress seach page

Please send any problems to:

Circulation: 802-443-5494 or library_circulation@middlebury.edu

Interlibrary Loan: 802-443-5498 or mdyill@middlebury.edu

– See more at: http://sites.middlebury.edu/lis/2014/12/17/new-button-appearing-in-your-nexpress-search-preview-of-new-resource-sharing-service-coming-in-january/#comments

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Friday Links – January 23, 2015

NEH & Mellon Announce Pilot Grant Program to Digitize Out of Print Books in Humanities and Make Them Available With CC License  (From infoDOCKET / Library Journal)

Experimental Meadowhawk Module Featured in Mercedes-Benz’s CES Concept Car – Embedded into the console, Leap Motion’s Meadowhawk modules allow drivers to access an experimental natural user interface.

CES 2015: Five big 3D printing trends to shape the year ahead – When it comes to 3D printing, the theme of 2015 is simple: make it useful. The last couple years has been exciting for fans of the technology and people in the industry, as it has developed so rapidly it has been hard to keep up with.

New responsive, mobile-friendly theme for CAS logins

The CAS login screen is now mobile-friendly.

Logging onto Middlebury web sites just got easier to do on your phone, tablet, or other small screen. Today we updated the Central Authentication Service (CAS) theme to dynamically reformat itself so that login form is easy to use on any screen size. No longer will you have to side-scroll or zoom to enter your username and password to access authenticated services.

Key Survey Downtime on Jan 17 for Hardware Maintenance

KeySurvey LogoThe following information is important only for individuals having a Key Survey account used to create, distribute, and work with surveys and response data.

Please be aware that the WorldAPP team (our Key Survey host) will be performing needed hardware maintenance on this coming Saturday, January 17, 2015, between the hours of:

EST:  2 am to 7 am   (GMT:  7 am to 12 pm)

During these hours Key Survey will be temporary unavailable.  Once the hardware maintenance has been completed, all applications, survey and forms links, and reports will be available as usual.

WorldAPP apologizes for the short notice and will be happy to answer any questions you may have about this maintenance.  Feel free to contact their Support Team via email (cs@worldapp.com), phone (781.849.8118), or live chat from www.keysurvey.com.

 

New online library resources for 2015

Over November and December of last year, the library purchased access to a number of fascinating library resources:

  • Gale Virtual Reference Library – we now have access to everything in the Gale Virtual Reference Library that was published prior to August 2014.GVRL
  • Alexander Street Drama – loaded with information about theatrical productions and with full-text scripts for many (but not all) plays by a wide breadth of playwrights, Alexander Street Drama includes Black Drama, Asian-American Drama, Latino Drama, and more.asd
  • Kanopy Streaming – members of the Middlebury College Community can now watch films from Kanopy (“Netflix for colleges”). Our access to this uses a “Patron-Driven Acquisitions” model. A film in the collection can be watched by any authorized user (student, faculty, staff member) anywhere, anytime – just click this link. The fourth time a given film is viewed, a purchase will be “triggered” and we will have licensed access to that film for a year. Kanopy
  • American History in Video – a student requested that we trial this collection of newsreels, documentaries and other historical film works. Browse by event, person, place, and more. ASP_AHV
  • National Anti-Slavery Standard – still in pre-publication, this is a database of images and some full-text from the National Anti-Slavery Standard – the official weekly newspaper of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Founded in 1833 by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan, the society sought to extend the rights of slaves across the country and implied not only suffrage rights for colored males, but also advocated suffrage for women.NASS
  • London Review of Books – by popular demand, we now have full access to current and past online content of the LRB! LRB
  • CQ Researcher Archive – we now have access to the full archive of CQ Researcher, going back to 1923. We’ve also filled in some gaps in our access to CQ Almanac, and added CQ’s Guides to U.S. Economic Policy, U.S. Environmental Policy, and U.S. Health & Healthcare Policy.
  • Coming Soon – Celebrity Studies, a new journal subscription

Friday links – January 9, 2015

Libraries are in the technology industry, says Rick Anderson. “… When we talk publicly about technological change in libraries, it seems to me that it’s too often in one of two ways: either we’re patting ourselves on the back for being so ready to embrace it, or we’re talking about how a particular change is just a fad and really doesn’t really apply to us. But the information world has become, decisively and whether we like it or not, a technology industry. … Confusing the sacredness of ends with the sacredness of means is one symptom of a disease that could easily kill us. …”