Tag Archives: Student projects

Brilliance Full and Wide: Transcription and Translation of a 1960s Chinese Manual of Poetry and Painting

The following transcription and translation of a 1960s Chinese Manual of Poetry and Painting in the museum’s study collection was created by Rebecca Li ’21.5 in connection with Professor Cynthia Packert’s spring 2020 course HARC 0347: Aesthetics of Asian Art. Brief Analysis Partially legible inscriptions on the front endpaper of the Manual of Poetry and...

Resources and Reflections: World AIDS Day 2020 and Beyond

On November 30 Visual AIDS premiered TRANSMISSIONS, a program of six new videos considering the impact of HIV and AIDS beyond the United States. For those who were not able to attend the premiere those videos are now available to stream, and we encourage you to visit the TRANSMISSIONS website to watch the films (please...

Day With(out) Art / World AIDS Day 2020

For the fifth consecutive year, the Museum and the Student Friends of the Art Museum are pleased to partner with GlobeMed, a student organization dedicated to improving global health, and the Rohatyn Center for Global Affairs to offer a series of events marking World AIDS Day. A video screening, a panel discussion with artists, a...

Race in the Woman Suffrage Movement: What the Sources Reveal and Conceal

By: Amy Morsman, Professor of History This time last year, the Museum opened a new exhibition entitled “Votes…for Women?” I served as curator of that exhibit, but I had considerable help, not only from an extraordinary team of talented museum professionals and faculty/staff colleagues, but also from a whole seminar full of students—15 first-year students—who...

Portrait of a Man: Govaert Flinck and the Rembrandt School

The following paper was researched, written, and presented as a public lecture by Carolina McGarity ’17, the museum’s 2014-2015 Robert F. Reiff Curatorial Intern. Introduction In his Portrait of a Man, [fig. 1] Govaert Flinck uses very Rembrandtesque elements and … Continue reading

Fabergé: The Social and Political Implications of Russian Decorative Arts

The Middlebury College Museum of Art possesses a remarkable collection of Russian artifacts and family keepsakes made by the firm of the famous jeweler, Carl Fabergé. This essay by Adrian Kerester ’15, adapted from her April 2013 lecture and reproduced here with permission, explores Russia’s social history at the turn of the last century through an examination of and conversation surrounding Russian decorative arts and the culture of Russia’s ruling aristocracy. Continue reading