Tag Archives: LIS Staff Interest

Weekly Web Updates – May 2, 2016

New Features

This week we’ve completed and begun testing an integration between the Course Hub and the Canvas LMS that provisions user accounts and course spaces on request (as we do with Moodle, SANSSpace, etc). This integration is in preparation for a July 1 budget decision on Canvas and will also be in place for an LS pilot of Canvas earlier in the summer.

Upgrades

Fixes and Tweaks

  • Added a “News Tags” taxonomy to the News content type on the Middlebury Drupal site. This will be used by College Communications to tag stories for the MiddNews newsletter.
  • The custom Middlebury MailChimp plugin for WordPress was replaced with the official MailChimp plugin and the two sites using the old plugin were transitioned to the new one.
  • We moved the Policies and Procedures pages in the Language School site, adding server-side rewrites to the new location.
  • When embedding images in content while selecting the option to show the image at full size on click, the image title and image alternate text tag are used to populate the caption, if not empty.

TOMORROW: Using GitHub for Education to Encourage Open Learning and Facilitate Feedback

Join us tomorrow, May 3rd, 12:15-1:30 PM, in Hillcrest 103 for the DLA’s final Behind the Scenes of the year, led by Albert Kim (Math). Albert will be sharing his experiences using GitHub as a feedback tool in his Data Science class this semester. Lunch will be served, so please RSVP at go/DLAscenes. Full description below.

Inspired by a humanist colleague’s approach to grading papers and discussions taking place in statistics pedagogy circles, Albert Kim (Math) presents his use of the GitHub web-based repository hosting service in his Introduction to Data Science course to encourage open and collaborative development of students’ coding skills and to facilitate the delivery of feedback from instructor to student. This short presentation will be followed by discussion of using digital tools for feedback in the classroom, so come with your questions. Lunch will be served, so please RSVP at go/DLAscenes.

Albert Y. Kim is originally from Montreal Quebec. After completing his PhD in statistics at the University of Washington in Seattle, he worked at Google as a Data Scientist for two years, followed by a two-year visiting stint at Reed College. He joined the Middlebury faculty in August 2015.

 

Join us at our first Write-In

On Wednesday, May 4th from 8-11 PM, the Writing Center at Middlebury College will join 75 other colleges and universities who sponsor a Write-In between the weeks of April 24-May 5. Supported by CTLR, the Writing Program and the Library, the Write-In fosters a writing community by creating a calm time and space in LIB 201, LIB 145 and the Harman Reading Room for students to write together. A Peer Writing Tutor and a Research Librarian will be on hand in LIB 201 to provide support. During the Write-In, students may work on academic papers, do personal writing, or brainstorm writing for fellowships, internships, and jobs. We’ll provide snacks and prizes. See Swarthmore’s International Write-In page for more information.

Why come to a Write-In?

Writing can be lonely, solitary work. Joining a group of other student writers can be motivating, productive, and calming.

How will this work?

  • Come to Davis Family Library 201 any time between 8-11 PM. Stay from 15 minutes to 3 hours.
  • Sign in to receive prizes
  • If you want, we’ll give you a pen and a pad.
  • Have some tasty snacks (Cheese and Crackers, Chicken Satay, Rice Krispie Treats, Brownies)
  • Meet with a Peer Writing Tutor or Research Librarian.
  • Stay in Lib 201, or go to one of our two reserved quiet spaces: Lib 145 and the Harman Reading Room.

What kind of writing should I do?

  • Academic writing (Start your end of the semester papers this week!) (We’ll provide some research questions.)
  • Personal writing (No idea where to start? We’ll provide some writing prompts.)
  • Brainstorm writing for fellowships, internships, and job applications (We have a handy worksheet to get you started.)

Who is making this great event happen?

@MiddInfoSec: Don’t Get Hooked

You may not realize it, but you are a phishing target at school, at work, and at home. Phishing attacks are a type of computer attack that use malicious emails to trick targets into giving up sensitive information. Ultimately, you are the most effective way to detect and stop phishing scams. When viewing email messages, texts, or social media posts, use the following techniques to prevent your passwords, personal data, or private information from being stolen by a phishing attack.

    • Verify the source. Check the sender’s email address to make sure it’s legitimate. Remember that the name of the sender is not the important part. The sender’s email address is what you are really looking for. If in doubt, forward your message to phishing@middlebury.edu.
    • Read the entire message carefully. Phishing messages may include a formal salutation, overly-friendly tone, grammatical errors, urgent requests, or gimmicks that do not match the normal tone of the sender.
    • Avoid clicking on erroneous links. Even if you know the sender, be cautious of links and attachments in messages. Don’t click on links that could direct you to a bad website. Hovering your mouse over a link should disclose the actual web address that the link is directing you too, which may be different from what is displayed in the message. Make sure this masked address is a site you want to visit.
    • Verify the intent of all attachments with the sender before opening them. Even when you know a sender, you should never open an attachment unless have checked with the sender to verify the attachment was sent intentionally. Word and Excel documents can contain malicious macros which could harm your computer. Other files, such as zip files and PDF files, could download malware onto your system. Always verify the intent of attachments with the sender before you open them from an email.
  • Verifying a message is always better than responding to a phish. If you ever receive a message that provides reason to pause, it is always better to forward the message to phishing@middlebury.edu or to send a separate email to the sender to verify its intent, before clicking a link or opening an attachment that could potentially impact the security of your computer..
  • Change your passwords if you have fallen for a phish. If you think you have fallen for a phishing attack, change your password at go/password and then contact the helpdesk at x2200. It is also a good practice to change your personal passwords outside of the College.

 

Watch for phishing scams. Common phishing scams are published at sites such as http://IC3.gov , http://phishing.org ,https://www.irs.gov/uac/Report-Phishing. These resources will also allow you to report phishing attacks if you should fall victim outside of the College. Again, if you think you have fallen victim to a phishing attack, always start by changing your passwords.

Weekly Web Updates – April 25, 2016

We’re currently working on some back-end tasks, like integration between the Course Hub and Canvas, a tool to audit usage of plugins and themes across multiple WordPress installations, updating our RSS caching tool to work with newer versions of the PHP HttpRequest library, and the initial migration of the Davis program sites to Drupal 8.

Updates

Fixes and Tweaks

  • We have updated the MiddSTART site, adding an index on several columns in the database which dramatically improves load time of the lists of donors from about 50 seconds to about five seconds.
  • Removed a restriction on guest accounts, allowing them to log into the Course Hub, which creates a local account that instructors can then add to course sites for the purpose of granting them access to Canvas.
  • The roll year in the Online Donor Roll was set to FY 2016 so that class agents and reunion committee members would properly appear.

Polycom Demo Units

Hi All,

We have temporarily deployed two new Polycom units for testing purposes, one to Library 221 and one to Exchange Street 109.  They both connect to the display via HDMI and are controlled with a remote control.  The necessary testing will be done internally, but I wanted to give potential users of the spaces a heads up.  Please feel free to use the equipment if you’re meeting in one of the rooms and would like to try it out!

One unit is located in Library 221, on top of the display.  It’s connected via HDMI to HDMI 1.  The number for this unit is 802221.  Virtual meeting room (VMR) number is 710221 (this should be used when connecting to more than 1 remote participant).  This is a new unit called the Polycom RealPresence Debut, which is specifically designed for smaller conference rooms.  It will be in place for the next 2-3 weeks.  For the trial, this unit will not be capable of sending content.

The other unit has been deployed to 109 Exchange Street, the small conference room next to the CSNS suite.  The number for this unit is 802109.  VMR number is 710109.  This unit is to test specifically with the Skype for Business pilot but can also be used for other meetings taking place between Exchange street and remote locations.  This unit will be in place for the duration of the Skype for Business trial.  Content must be sent to this unit using the People + Content IP program, found here.  Instructions on sending content using People + Content IP can be found here.  The IP for the unit is: 140.233.18.120 (Directions for using the unit specifically with Skype for Business are forthcoming!).

Please email mpauly@middlebury.edu if you have questions or feedback regarding either of these Polycom devices.

Thanks!

Mack