Tag Archives: Allopathic Medicine

Walking on Eggshells in Medical Schools

Is it possible to train doctors without hurting anyone’s feelings?

“I trained to be a doctor in the bad old days — not the worst old days, but the bad old days. Humiliation was part of the deal, sometimes deliberately inflicted by certain grandstanding, sadistic attending physicians, sometimes more casually, because everyone could see that you didn’t know something you should have known.”

Read the full NYT article by Perry Klass, MD here.

Midd Grads @ Med School

If you are in the process of applying to medical school (or thinking of applying in the future,) we have created a Google map of where Midd grads have matriculated to medical school over the last three years. The map will help you see where alumni are located. Simply click on the map pin and it will tell you what school and how many alumni matriculated that year. Keep an eye on the map as we will be adding DO, dental and veterinary schools as well.

Check out the Google map here.

Applying to Medical School: 2018 AMCAS Medical School Applications by the Numbers

Are you preparing to apply to medical school? With the 2020 AMCAS application cycle underway as of May 1, AAMC is sharing information about the qualifications and motivations of applicants who applied and enrolled during the 2018 AMCAS application cycle. See the full infographic here.

Pre-SOMA ShaDO Week April 8-12

UNE COM and their Student Osteopathic Medical Association (SOMA) chapter along with Pre-SOMA National are teaming up again to host ShaDO Week for prospective medical students.

Are you curious about osteopathic medicine? Then sign up for ShaDO Week! They have a group of first year medical students hosting prospective medical students on April 9th, 10th, and 11th. You will have the opportunity to attend classes, go to lunch, and chat with current medical students.

Interested? Registration closes April 3rd. Register here.

Finding Shadowing Opportunities

Shadowing is the act of following a professional as they do their typical work activities in a clinic or hospital setting. You might ask why this experience is so important? First, it may be the defining experience which tells you whether or not you want to be a physician. Shadowing gives you a very tangible sense of what life is like for a professional. Through working alongside a professional, you can gain unique insight into what happens in a day in the life of your career of choice. You get a sense of what it’s like working with patients, working with other health care professionals (nurses, PAs, and therapists), and what the challenges and rewards are of working in the profession. You’ll learn how a health professional organizes their day, allows time for the unexpected, stays current in the profession, integrates personal and professional life, and manage the financial aspects of their practice.

Shadowing can also be crucial for a second reason: Having clinical experience allows admissions committees know that you have some understanding of what you are getting into. It also shows admissions officers your commitment to a health career because you have taken initiative in learning about being a professional prior to applying to school.

The AAMC also has a handout on Guidelines for Clinical Shadowing Experiences.

If you have any questions, please schedule an appointment with one of the advisors.

UNE COM Live Events – Spring 2019

Interact with Osteopathic Medical Students!

Visit Maine from your computer. Check out the University of New England Virtual Info Sessions:

Mid-Atlantic Prospective Student Event: Medical Student Panel on Monday, March 4 from 12:15-1:15 pm (EST)

National Osteopathic Medicine (NOM) Week: OMN Demonstration on Tuesday, April 16 from 12:15-1:00 pm (EST)

How to Apply! Q&A with Graduate Admissions on Tuesday, May 8 from 12:15-1:15 pm (EST)

Premedical Students: Five Ways to Gain Experience Without Shadowing

Gaining clinical experience is an important part of the medical school application. But to be a competitive medical school applicant, some have questioned if it’s necessary to shadow a doctor. It’s true that shadowing is great experience, as it exposes you to patient care in a clinical setting and gives you an idea of the day-to-day demands of a medical career. But as a pre-med student, you’re often balancing a rigorous academic schedule, along with extracurricular and personal responsibilities, so shadowing may not be a possibility. Click here for the full AAMC article on gaining experience without shadowing.

  1. Become a Hospice Volunteerfind hospice locations in your home town, or if you are in Middlebury, contact Hospice Volunteer Services
  2. Become a Certified Nursing Assistantlearn more about CNA
  3. Volunteer as an EMT – apply for the winter-term EMT course here at Middlebury, or take a course over the summer in your home town
  4. Become a Hospital Scribe
  5. Serve as a Caretaker – with the help of our colleagues in the Center for Community Engagement, we often cross-post local caretaking opportunities for students to apply to. You can also follow their blog to learn more about opportunities.