Category Archives: GIS

Rikert Ski Touring

I believe one of the greatest secrets at Middlebury College is the Rikert Ski Touring Center, located at Breadloaf Campus up in Ripton. Home to the Middlebury Nordic teams, as well as my daughter’s Middlebury High School team, this gem of a ski area has very well groomed trails, wonderful staff, and, this year, plenty of snow.

This coming weekend is the Bill Koch Ski Festival, so in honor of the weekend I’ve made something for the kids to play with, if yours are anything like mine. I’ve converted some Arc GIS files to a Google Earth File, so now you can fly around Rikert in Google Earth and see where you went skiing for the day. Chester Harvey in the Geography department has made a new trail map for Rikert based on this shapefile, and I’ve taken the trail names both off of that new map, as well as the older traditional map.  So the Google Earth file is still a rough draft, and some of the trail names may be a little off, but it’s still fun.

Right click here, and choose Save As, then don’t forget where that is. Clicking on that file should open it in the right program. Naturally, you will need Google Earth installed on your computer. I’ve been having bad blog luck, and just clicking on the file itself will probably lead to a page of gobbledigook.

A New Tree Map

Admittedly, the campus tree map posted on this site can be a little overwhelming, and almost too large to be useful. Google Earth is a wonderful program, but not everyone had access to it. Ben Meader, a digital media tutor from this past summer, toured the campus with me one day, and we picked the 99 must see trees on campus. This represents one of nearly every variety of tree on campus. He then took pictures, and put them all into a Google Maps file, viewable from any web browser, no Google Earth required. The link is also available on the campus tree map page. Enjoy!

Teaching with Technology Fair

It’s Commencement (literally, it’s about 9:30 Sunday morning, we’ve been at it since 5 Am, but now us landscapers are hiding around campus working where you can’t see us), hence the lack of any posts the last week or so. I’ve got a lot to write, but being a landscaper in spring has it’s disadvantages, time management being a one of them.  I just wanted to mention I’ll be at the Teaching with Technology Fair on Wednesday, in the Great Hall at Bicentennial Hall from 10-12, showing off the Campus Tree Map. If you’re curious as to the ArcGIS underpinnings of the map, or just want to drop by to talk plants, come on over.

Mapping in WordPress – GeoPress and GeoMashup

Robyn Tendai-Whyte and I just ran GeoPress and GeoMashup through the paces today. Both performed beautifully after a bit of massaging (and reading the directions!) Here are a few tips that we found helpful for anyone at Middlebury who would like to geo-locate their blog.

GeoPress

This plugin will allow you to take any post and add a Google map with a stick pin location. This is a nice feature for bloggers who are traveling, or who would like to give geographic location to a historical reference.

To use this plugin-

  1. Click on the “Plugins” link in the upper right hand corner of your blog’s Dashboard.
  2. Click the “Activate” link to the right of the GeoPress plugin.
  3. Click on the GeoPress tab, just under the name of your blog in the upper-left.
  4. Get a GoogleMaps Key and paste it next to GoogleMaps Key.
  5. Get a Yahoo AppID and paste it next to Yahoo AppID.
  6. Click on the UPDATE OPTIONS button.
  7. When you write a new post, scroll down to LOCATION.
  8. Type in an address and click on the “Geocode” link.
  9. Save and Publish your post.

The map will appear under your post with the location marked.

GeoMashup

GeoMashup works in a different way. It will take all posts that have a location added, and create one map on a single page with a stick pin for every location.

To use this plugin-

  1. Click on the “Plugins” link in the upper right hand corner of your blog’s Dashboard.
  2. Click the “Activate” link to the right of the GeoMashup plugin.
  3. Click on the Settings tab in the upper-right.
  4. Click on the “Geo Mashup” tab.
  5. Get a GoogleMaps Key and paste it next to GoogleMaps Key. If you are using GeoPress, you may use the same Key (NOTE: Your key needs to be registered to your blog site: http://sites.middlebury.edu/[name of my blog])
  6. Choose the page where you would like the map to appear.
  7. Click on the UPDATE OPTIONS button.
  8. In the page you selected, add <!--GeoMashup--> in the content.
  9. When you write a new post, scroll down to LOCATION. If GeoPress is activated, this will be the second map.
  10. Type in an address and hit return. You will see a pin with your location.
  11. Save and Publish your post.

The page you selected will now have one map with every location on it. Each location will be labeled with the name of the post.