Vergennes to Boston to Rome: A Neoclassical Marble Portrait by Vermont-born Sculptor Margaret Foley

By: Richard Saunders, Museum Director and Professor of History of Art and Architecture In the past year the Museum was able to acquire a stunning neoclassical marble portrait tondo carved in 1862 in Rome. What is particularly notable about the

Meaningful Juxtapositions: Reshaping our Permanent Collection Galleries

Since, as a result of pandemic safety measures, the Museum is physically closed to the public until March of 2021, our staff are taking advantage of the continued closure to rethink substantially the ways in which we contextualize and display

Race in the Woman Suffrage Movement: What the Sources Reveal and Conceal

By: Amy Morsman, Professor of History This time last year, the Museum opened a new exhibition entitled “Votes…for Women?” I served as curator of that exhibit, but I had considerable help, not only from an extraordinary team of talented museum

Label Talk: Museum Mosaics—One Object, Many Voices

During a 2019 re-installation of an Early Byzantine floor fragment, Museum staff invited three members of our community—an artist, an ecologist, and an archaeologist—to offer their perspectives on this mosaic. Recognizing that there are many ways to interpret a single

Portrait of an Inventor: Middlebury College Museum of Art welcomes daguerreotype of acclaimed local, John Deere.

19th century inventor, John Deere, sits proudly on top of his plow in this new edition to Middlebury College Museum of Art’s prominent daguerreotype collection. The daguerreotype is being prepped for it’s debut in the museum’s upcoming exhibition, American Faces:

Behind the Scenes: Photographic documentation of two 18th century Japanese screens

It may be “lights out” in the galleries on Mondays at the Middlebury College Museum of Art, but some works of art have not taken the day to rest. While the museum was closed to the public on a Monday

Portrait of a Man: Govaert Flinck and the Rembrandt School

The following paper was researched, written, and presented as a public lecture by Carolina McGarity ’17, the museum’s 2014-2015 Robert F. Reiff Curatorial Intern. Introduction In his Portrait of a Man, [fig. 1] Govaert Flinck uses very Rembrandtesque elements and

Steel Yourselves, Here Comes Youbie Obie

It’s been exactly twenty years since the Committee on Art in Public Places (CAPP) accepted Jules Olitski’s King Kong—a beautifully abstract, almost minimalist work in cor-ten steel, gifted to the College by Sophia Healy, daughter of former professor Arthur Healy—and sited it in front of the Johnson Building. This summer, as a serendipitous, unwitting tribute to the acquisition of King Kong, CAPP has accepted another gift in cor-ten steel, a monumental work by Middlebury alumnus J. Pindyck Miller ’60 titled Youbie Obie.