Software Carpentry @ Middlebury, 2019

By Ryan Clement, Data Services Librarian, Middlebury College

On January 17-18, 2019, Middlebury is hosting a Software Carpentry workshop for faculty, staff, and students. This workshop is co-sponsored by the Middlebury Library, the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research (CTLR), the Digital Liberal Arts Initiative (DLA), and the Director of the Sciences.

The Carpentries are a fiscally sponsored project of Community Initiatives. They teach skills that are immediately useful for researchers, using lessons and datasets that allow you to quickly apply what you have learned to your own work. I’m really excited about using the Software Carpentry curriculum here to help our faculty, staff, and students become more efficient in their research.

This workshop is discipline agnostic. The curriculum will include:

  • Shell scripting in the bash shell (using the command line)
  • Version control with git and GitHub
  • Data manipulation, analysis, and visualization with R/RStudio

The target audience is learners who have little to no prior computational experience, and the instructors will put a priority on creating a friendly environment to empower researchers and enable data-driven discovery. Even those with some experience will benefit, as the goal is to teach not only how to do analyses, but how to manage the process to make it as automated and reproducible as possible. For instance, after attending this workshop you will be able to:

  • Write a loop that applies one or more commands separately to each file in a set of files
  • Share your code and make it easy to cite
  • Read tabular data from a file into R and perform operations on it
  • Manage files and projects in RStudio
  • Use ggplot2 and R to create publication-quality graphics

Space is limited and it will likely fill quickly. This workshop is free of charge, and lunch and coffee breaks will be provided. Here is a registration link: http://go.middlebury.edu/swc2019-registration/, and the workshop webpage http://go.middlebury.edu/swc2019 for more information.

Questions? Send email to Ryan Clement, rclement@middlebury.edu.

We hope to see you at the workshop!

Intro to Visualizing Data with Plot.ly

March 18th, 2016
1:30-3:00 P.M.
Wilson Media Lab
Davis Family Library 220

Are you new to working with data? Ryan Clement, Data Services Librarian, will lead a workshop on how to create effective and informative visualizations with data. He’ll cover some of the basic theory of visual communication, including how to choose the best visual representation for your data, and best practices for preparing visualizations for print, the web, or presenting. Participants will then work with a web application called Plot.ly to design their own visualizations. Space is limited, so reserve your spot today by signing up below.

Current Sign-up Sheets

No sheets available at this time.

Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Winter Term 2016

See a retrospective video of this event:

January 19th-22nd, 2016, 1:00-4:00 P.M.
Location: Wilson Media Lab, 220 Davis Family Library
Open to all Middlebury faculty, staff, and students

Photograph of silhouette of woman in front of projected data art project
Photo by Flickr user r2hox, used under Creative Commons Licensing.

Are you new to working with data for digital scholarship? Alicia Peaker and Ryan Clement will be offering a workshop series, January 19-22, that will introduce participants to the basics of working with data as well as some free, web-based tools. The series includes one required course, “Working with Data,” as well as three à la carte courses over the following three days on mapping data, visualizing data, and analyzing textual data. Attend one, or attend all four! All courses will be 3 hours long and will include discussions of background concepts as well as hands-on work. Because these courses will be tailored to the participants’ interests and disciplines, the deadline for signing up is January 1st. Please contact Alicia Peaker or Ryan Clement with any questions.

Prerequisite Course

Working with Data

What is data and how do you work with it? In this course, participants will work in teams to interpret, clean, and understand a dataset provided by the instructors. We will then reflect on this exercise and discuss the process and products of working with data, while learning how to manage and make this practice more efficient. No experience working with data is expected, though some familiarity with MS Excel will be helpful. This course is required to participate in any of the next three session of the Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp.

À la Carte Courses

Visualizing Data

In this session, we’ll cover some of the basic theory of visual communication, including how to choose the best visual representation for your data, and best practices for preparing visualizations for print, the web, or presenting. We’ll discuss traditional representations, including bar, line, and scatterplots, as well as touching on more advanced representations. After a discussion of how visualizations are used (and advanced) in humanistic research, we’ll use freely available web-based tools to create our own visualizations.

Mapping Data

In this session, we’ll work through how to prepare, use, and present spatial data. We’ll start with an overview of spatial literacy topics, including how to select a projection (and why it’s important), working with map layers, and basic cartographic theory. We’ll then explore some library resources for creating maps and obtaining spatial data, and then create our own maps using free, web-based tools.

Analyzing Textual Data

In this session, we’ll work through how to prepare, use, and analyze textual data (e.g. novels, newspapers, journals, plays, survey responses, etc.) to address humanistic research questions. While quantitative approaches may be appropriate for some research questions, this session will primarily focus on text mining as an exploratory practice that leads to or helps refine analysis.

Reserve your spot now for the Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp, co-taught by Alicia Peaker and Ryan Clement.

 

 

Introduction to Digital Text Analysis Workshop

November 13th, 2015, 1:30-3:00 P.M.
Location: Wilson Media Lab, 220 Davis Family Library
Open to all Middlebury faculty, staff, and students

Photo of letter tiles
Photo from Text Shuttle, used under Fair Use.

What is text mining? And how can it be used to read texts differently?

This workshop, led by DLA Postdoc Alicia Peaker, will introduce the varied ways humanists have used text mining tools and concepts (e.g. “distant reading”) to analyze texts. Participants will then be invited to explore a shared set of texts with the user-friendly text mining and visualization tool Voyant. Voyant is particularly well suited to the classroom and has been used successfully in many literature courses.

Absolutely no prior experience is necessary, but participants interested in getting a head start on digital text analysis prior to the workshop are encouraged to read Ted Underwood’s “Seven Ways Humanists are Using Computers to Understand Text.”

Current Sign-up Sheets

No sheets available at this time.

Introduction to Scholarly Markup and the TEI

October 30th, 2015, 10:30-12:00 P.M.
Location: Wilson Media Lab, 220 Davis Family Library

Photo of pen on page with red editing marks
Photo by Flickr user Nic McPhee, used under Creative Commons Licensing.

Sarah Stanley, an alumnus of the Northeastern University Women Writers Project, will lead a session on how to conduct research using scholarly markup. During the session, Sarah will provide an overview of the Text Encoding Initiative guidelines for markup and will also share some current projects that use the TEI. Finally, Sarah will provide a demonstration of the different tools and platforms you can use to create and publish TEI data. If you are looking to start a markup project, but don’t know where to begin, this session will provide you with a starting-point. No prior experience with markup is necessary.

Open to all Middlebury faculty, staff, and students.

Current Sign-up Sheets

No sheets available at this time.

Building Digital Exhibits with Omeka Workshop

October 16th, 2015, 1:30-3:00 P.M.
Location: Wilson Media Lab, 220 Davis Family Library

Seeking alternative models for research essays?
Looking for ways to engage your students with public audiences?
In need of a digital supplement to your book project? 

With Omeka, you can create beautiful online exhibits of your art, videos, documents, or other collections. Omeka, sometimes referred to as “WordPress for museums,” is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. It was created at the Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University and is one of the most widely implemented digital humanities tools.

This workshop will introduce you to the basics of planning a digital exhibit and get you started with your own Omeka.net digital exhibit. DLA Postdoc Alicia Peaker will be leading the workshop. She has also worked as the Director of Our Marathon, a digital archive, ​built with Omeka, of crowdsourced materials related to the 2013 Boston bombings.

While enrollment is limited, materials used in the workshop, including the presentation slide deck, can be found at go.middlebury.edu/omeka.

Current Sign-up Sheets

No sheets available at this time.

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Introduction to Video Editing Workshop

April 24th, 1:30-3:00 P.M.
Wilson Media Lab

Photo of video editing software on computer screen
Photo by Flickr user WCN 24/7, used under Creative Commons licensing.

In this workshop we’ll be working with Adobe Premiere Pro editing software to introduce the basics of narrative and non-fiction editing. Instruction will be focused on beginning to intermediate editors, but all skill levels are welcome. For the first hour we will work toward an assembly edit of an interview for a non-fiction film and a rough cut of a scene from a narrative short film (media will be provided). Editing concepts and software features will be introduced and explained as they are encountered during the editing process.

Each participant will have their own workstation and can actively follow along throughout the process. During the last half hour of the workshop participants can choose one of the sequences (narrative or non-narrative) and can continue putting some polish on them while I assist and answer questions.

This workshop will be led by Ethan Murphy, Media Production Specialist with assistance from Matt Lennon, DLA Arts Technology Assistant.

Sign up below to reserve your spot.

Current Sign-up Sheets

Title Date Open Spots  
Digital History as Team Sport: Applying Design Thinking to the Study of the Past N/A 0

Building Digital Exhibits with Omeka

March 3rd, 2015, 4:30-5:30 P.M.
Wilson Media Lab (DFL 220)

Seeking alternative models for research essays?
Looking for ways to engage your students with public audiences?
In need of a digital supplement to your book project? 

With Omeka, you can create beautiful online exhibits of your art, videos, documents, or other collections. Omeka, sometimes referred to as “WordPress for museums,” is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. It was created at the Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University and is one of the most widely implemented digital humanities tools.

This workshop will introduce you to the basics of planning a digital exhibit and get you started with your own Omeka.net digital exhibit. DLA Post-doc Alicia Peaker will be leading the workshop. She has also worked as the Director of Our Marathon, a digital archive, ​built with Omeka, of crowdsourced materials related to the 2013 Boston bombings.

While enrollment is limited, materials used in the workshop, including the presentation slide deck, can be found at go.middlebury.edu/omeka.

Current Sign-up Sheets

Title Date Open Spots  
Digital History as Team Sport: Applying Design Thinking to the Study of the Past N/A 0

omekanetlogo

3D Printing Workshop

February 24, 12:30-1:45 P.M.
Johnson Design Lab (campus map)

Photo of Makerbot Industries Replicator 2 3D Printer
Image by Flickr Commons user Creative Tools.

What is 3D Printing and why are so many people thrilled by the possibilities of this new technology? Come find out at a friendly, low-tech introduction to the tool. See the 3D printer in action. Get inspired by examples of what other people have done with the tool. Bring a couple of ideas for your upcoming projects and we’ll brainstorm ways that 3D printing technology can enrich your project goals.

This workshop will be led by Daniel Houghton, the DLA Arts Technology Specialist.

Current Sign-up Sheets

Title Date Open Spots  
Digital History as Team Sport: Applying Design Thinking to the Study of the Past N/A 0

Crafting Digital Narratives with Scalar

January 21, 2:45 – 4:15 P.M.
Wilson Media Lab (220 Davis Family Library)

Screen shot of Scalar book project

From non-linear storytelling to rich, scholarly annotations, this workshop will encourage new ways of thinking about writing in digital environments. Using a web application called Scalar, you will begin to craft a media-rich digital narrative. Scalar is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways. No technical expertise required.

This workshop is currently full. Please contact Alicia Peaker for a schedule of upcoming workshops or to set up a consultation.

You can view the slides for this workshop here.

Sample Scalar projects referenced in the workshop:

 

Building Digital Exhibits with Omeka

January 14, 2015, 2:45-4:15 P.M. &
January 27, 2015, 2:45-4:15 P.M.
Wilson Media Lab (DFL 220)

DLA Post-doc Alicia Peaker will be leading two introductory workshops to Omeka, an open-source, web-based platform for building digital exhibits. The workshop is part of the Winter Term Digital Media Boot Camp. While enrollment is limited, materials used in the workshop, including the presentation slide deck, can be found at go.middlebury.edu/omeka.

omekanetlogo