I asked my class what they learned about writing this semester.

Take a chance.

  • To write whatever comes to mind when writing.
  • It is okay to make mistakes.
  • Making digital stories

Use the Writing Process.

  • Writing is a process that takes patience.
  • Edit and make drafts
  • Work with multiple drafts
  • The usefulness of writing multiple drafts and peer revision
  • Writing is not constructed in one draft.
  • Discussing and reading out loud
  • The importance of giving our peer students advice after having analyzed each other’s papers
  • For brainstorms, just write! Organize later.

Know Your Nuts and Bolts.

  • Dependent and independent clauses
  • Proper citation
  • MLA internal citation (Author Page # no comma between)
  • Ben & Jerry’s ice cream not Ben’s and Jerry’s ice cream
  • Do not leave your quotes hanging.
  • I learned how to introduce quotations from They Say/I Say.

Write with Style and Get to the Point.

  • Not to use the passive voice
  • Not to use “be “ verbs
  • Papers are better when written in the active voice.
  • Transitions are extremely important.
  • Every word is important. Get to the point. Don’t waste words.
  • Fancy words don’t make writing better.
  • Don’t try to be too fancy. Get to the point.
  • Coherence in essays

Organize and Analyze.

  • Thesis
  • How to write powerful and informative thesis statements
  • Your thesis statement should explain the direction your paper will be taking.
  • Better paper structure
  • How to structure a paper effectively
  • Quality structure, organization, and ideas are more important than amazing Wow!) conclusions.
  • Creative writing requires a good use of time, space, anecdotes and details
  • Analysis

Final Tips and Advice

Organize Your Paper Well

  • Have a detailed, specific thesis that drives your paper.
  • Make sure each paragraph has a central idea expressed in a topic sentence.
  • Each paragraph should have PEA—point, evidence, and analysis.
  • Quotations are evidence, not points. Introduce; quote; analyze.
  • End the paper with something new to think about that comes from your argument.

Avoid the following. They weigh down your paper, and make it tedious to read. Use strong, vital verbs, and specific, precise examples to bolster your points.

  • Code Words (important, significant, etc.),
  • “Be” verbs (am, is, are, was, were, be, being, been),
  • Passive voice (has been noted),
  • Nominalizations (investigation rather than investigate),
  • Fluff—big fluff that tells nothing or the obvious and little fluff that takes ten words to say what could be said in two.

Important Tips to Remember:

  •  Save contractions (can’t, don’t) for informal writing.
  •  Make sure pronouns agree with antecedents in person, number, and gender.
  •  Participles are part adjective, so place them close to the word or phrase they modify.
  •  Join two independent clauses with a comma PLUS a coordinating conjunction (and, or, but, yet, so, nor, for).
  • Use the present tense when writing about literature and film.
  • Make sure that your verb agrees with your subject (especially check if your subject and verb are far apart in the sentence).

To make writing more coherent:

  • <–Place older, more familiar, easier information at the beginning of the sentence.
  • Place newer, more important, more difficult information at the end of the sentence. –>

To move the emphasis to the end of a sentence:

  • Shift new and important information to the right. ->->->->->
  • Trim the end; extract and isolate the main ideas.
  • Remember that all endings are important: end of sentence, end of paragraph, and most important—end of paper. End with a bang.

Check the following:

  • Create a good title for your paper. Your title should give your reader a clue about the about the main idea of your paper. The name of the book is the author’s title not yours. Do not forget to have your name on your paper.
  • Learn how to number your pages. Hint: check out the “Insert” menu in MSWord.
  • Cite correctly and accurately. Learn how to do this.
  • Proofread carefully.

 

December in the Writing Center & Exam Tutoring Schedule

Peer Writing tutors will be available Sunday-Tuesday Dec 13-15 during the exam period. This includes Commons writing tutors on Sunday night. From Wednesday, December 16th on, there will be no more drop-in writing tutors until spring semester.

Peer Writing Tutors are available during exam week!

 We are the authorized aid.

 

Sunday, December 13

 

Monday, December 14

 

Tuesday, December 15

CTLR

7:30 – 10:00 pm

Davis Family Library, Suite 225

 

Dylan Otterbein

CRWR, ENAM, FMMC, GSFS, HARC, PHIL

 

Dylan Otterbein

CRWR, ENAM, FMMC, GSFS, HARC, PHIL

 

Clare Donohue-Meyer

CMLT, ENAM, GEOG

CTLR

9:45 pm –

12:00 am

Davis Family Library, Suite 225

 

Patrick Monette

BIOL, CHEM, RELI

 

Anna Iglitzin

ENAM, SOAN

 

Nathan Gee

ECON, HIST, PSCI

Atwater

8:00 – 10:00 pm

Allen Conference Room

 

Jingyi Wu

CRWR, GSFS, MATH, PHIL

   
Brainerd

8:00 – 10 pm

Stewart 219

Commons Office

 

Daniel Ramirez

CMLT, PHIL

   
Brainerd

10:00 pm –

12:00 am

Stewart 219

Commons Office

 

Jerrica Davy

CRWR, ENAM, FMMC, PHIL, SOAN

   
Cook

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Battell North 150

Commons Office

 

Jena Ritchey

ENAM, EDST, GEOG, SOAN

   
Ross

9:00 – 11:00 pm

Milliken 2 Lounge,

Room L21

 

Eliane Helitzer

ECON, ENAM, RELI

   
Wonnacott

9:00 – 11:00 pm

Battell South 124

Commons Office

 

Elana Schrager

AMST, CRWR, ENAM, GSFS,

HIST, SOAN

   

 

 

 

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