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Starting the NESCAC POY Discussion

With one week remaining in the NESCAC regular season, we wanted to start to analyze the top candidates for NESCAC Player of the Year. This is a good time to gauge what has been accomplished thus far from an individual standpoint, and position ourselves to assess the final weekend of play appropriately. In order to do that, we ranked the top 13 players in the conference by their statistical outputs. Limiting the discussion to stats alone is a good and instructive way to generate an idea of where each player stands, but it clearly does not comprehensively capture value. For example, John Swords’ interior presence and its effect on Bowdoin’s smothering defense is probably not conveyed by his 1.9 blocks per game, alone. Likewise, Aaron Toomey’s creation of opportunities within Amherst’s conference-leading offense goes beyond his 6.4 assists per game. But for now, and for what it’s worth, here are the top 13 players in the NESCAC through five weekends of play, based only on statistical output.

PPG

APG

RPG

BPG

SPG

FG

3FG

FT

TOPG

MPG

1.

Robinson

18.1

2.1

5.4

1.0

0.9

60

52

86

1.3

36

2.

Toomey

21.1

6.4

5.2

0.2

1.2

46

37

92

2.7

34

3.

Kizel

17.2

6.1

4.4

0.3

1.5

43

46

81

2.6

37

4.

Mayer

18.9

1.8

8.8

0.5

0.6

51

20

81

1.0

28

5.

Sinnickson

17.5

0.5

6.6

0.9

0.6

48

45

66

0.9

28

6.

Lopez

16.6

1.9

2.0

0.1

1.6

46

46

74

0.8

30

7.

Hart

20.5

2.0

3.6

0.1

0.6

44

40

87

1.9

34

8.

Hudnut

16.9

4.0

8.2

0.6

0.4

46

32

81

2.5

34

9.

Sabety

14.4

0.0

4.9

2.9

0.1

67

0

46

1.4

24

10.

Killian

14.4

1.7

6.4

0.2

2.7

45

35

80

1.2

37

11.

Swords

12.9

1.5

9.1

1.9

0.1

67

0

51

1.3

29

12.

Boornazien

17.1

1.9

7.2

0.6

0.4

41

41

82

2.0

34

13.

Edmonds

15.1

1.1

3.5

0.0

0.6

46

42

77

2.3

34

Robinson and Toomey are 1a and 1b right now. Robinson’s efficiency statistics are in another stratosphere, while Toomey leads this group in scoring and assists, and is first among guards in rebounds. Lopez’s placement at six might seem surprising, but it is hard to argue with his scoring efficiency numbers. Hart’s prolific scoring is offset by his weak peripheral numbers. Hudnut’s 4.0 assists per game and Killian’s 2.7 steals per game are two of the more impressive and surprising numbers on this list. Sabety is tied with Swords in field goal percentage (67), but his points per game and blocks per game are higher, and come in fewer minutes. Following this weekend, we will undertake a more comprehensive analysis of the question.

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