Eclipses


  • imminent eclipses visible from Middlebury

Total Solar Eclipse of 2017 August 21

Note: Please see below for critical eye safety information! Remember to never look at the sun without proper eye protection as severe and permanent eye injury can result.

Other press coverage: Tips for the Eclipse,
Everything You Need to Know About the Upcoming Solar Eclipse

A solar eclipse will happen in the skies above Middlebury on the afternoon of Monday, August 21. 2017. Although this will be a total solar eclipse elsewhere, Middlebury will only experience a partial solar eclipse. The partial phase of the eclipse will begin at about 1:23pm, maximum partial eclipse will be about 2:41pm, and the partial phase of the eclipse will end at about 3:54pm.

The maximum partial eclipse will be ~69% by magnitude (diameter) and will be ~62% by obscuration (area).

Approximate Timeline (for Middlebury)
2017 Aug 21 1:23pm Partial eclipse begins
2017 Aug 21 2:41pm Maximum partial eclipse
2017 Aug 21 3:54pm Partial eclipse begins
All times Eastern. Data courtesy USNO.

A solar eclipse happens when the earth passes through the moon’s shadow. Effectively, the moon is passing between the sun and the earth and the moon is blocking the sun’s light from reaching the earth.

Solar Eclipse, NASA

We will not have an Observatory event during this solar eclipse. However, a variety of Vermont organizations and institutions are planning eclipse-related events, some of which may involve viewing and which may be weather permitting. Please check out these sites, have a look at Astronomy Vermont for more Vermont astronomy resources, or visit NASA’s Eclispe Across America live internet streaming on eclipse day:

Solar eclipses are not safe to view without proper training and equipment. One should never look at the sun with the naked, unaided eye, with binoculars, or with a telescope without a filter specifically designed to block almost all of the sun’s light. Looking at the sun even momentarily can cause severe and permanent eye injury.

If you use solar eclipse viewing equipment, please make sure that the equipment is safe, that you know how to properly use it, and that you know how to inspect it for safety. Always supervise the use of safe eclipse viewing equipment by children. This document does not constitute medical advice. Readers with questions should contact a qualified eye-care professional. Middlebury College is not responsible for the content of these external or embedded web links and resources.

While eclipse glasses are a popular viewing method, they are not as readily available for buying or borrowing at this late date. If you are able to obtain some, please be sure that they meet or exceed appropriate ISO 12312-2 safety standards. While many libraries were provided with eclipse glasses through a foundation, those supplies have generally already been exhausted or spoken for, at least locally.

However, there are many other ways to view a solar eclipse, including indirect projection methods which can be safer, potentially allow enjoyment by several people at once, and which can be created, implemented, or obtained on a shorter timescale. This includes very simple pinhole projection to display an image of the sun onto the ground or another flat surface for indirect viewing. Advice, instructions, and templates for these sorts of methods can be found on the web. However, no matter the method, please following the safety advice above as well as the safety advice specific to the viewing equipment and method.

A solar eclipse can be an amazing and memorable experience, but please be sure to be safe and prepare and plan accordingly!

A variety of general eye safety resources are available at these web sites:

A variety of resources on safety for specific viewing methods are available at these web sites:

Additional resources, including maps, viewing methods, and additional safety considerations are also available:

The next solar eclipse happening in the skies above Middlebury will be a partial annular solar eclipse on the morning of Thursday, June 10, 2021. The next total solar eclipse happening in the skies above Middlebury will be when it experiences full totality on the afternoon of Monday, April 8, 2024.

 

Get Ready for the 2017 Solar Eclipse, NASA Goddard

2017 Total Solar Eclipse’s Path Across the U.S., NASA Goddard

Tracing the 2017 Solar Eclipse, NASA Goddard

Eclipses: Crash Course Astronomy #5, Crash Course

How to Safely Watch a Solar Eclipse, NASA Goddard

Watching the Friendly Skies – Eclipse Safety Tutorial, NASA Goddard

How to Make a Pinhole Projector to View the Solar Eclipse, NASA Goddard

ScienceCasts: The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse, Science at NASA

 

 

 


  • upcoming eclipses

  • The next total lunar eclipse partially visible from Middlebury will be on the morning of Wednesday, January 31, 2018. The next total lunar eclipse fully visible from Middlebury will be on the evening of Sunday, January 20, 2019.
     
    Lunar Eclipse, NASA

     

  • The next solar eclipse happening in the skies above Middlebury will be a total solar eclipse on the afternoon of Monday, August 21, 2017. However, Middlebury will only experience a partial eclipse.
     
    Solar Eclipse, NASA

 

 

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