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September 08, 2008

Paragraph Formation

Posted in: paragraph,structure

Point/evidence/analysis

Each body paragraph should make a point (preferably in its topic sentence).

That point should be followed by specific evidence that proves it

and by analysis that augments the point and its evidence.

(POINT/Topic Sentence) A third characteristic of the bond between Jane and Elizabeth that has implications for their relationships with their future husbands deals with the concern that each has for the well-being and happiness of the other. (Evidence) Towards the very beginning of the novel, Elizabeth discovers that Jane has taken ill and, “feeling really anxious, was determined to go to her”(22). Furthermore, later when Mr. Bingley’s departure from Netherfield threatens Jane’s happiness, Elizabeth can “think of nothing else”(90). By completely putting aside her own welfare and concerns in favor of Jane’s, Elizabeth demonstrates her selfless love for her sister. The miniseries portrays this visually through Elizabeth’s expressions of concern and sympathy when she speaks to Jane about Bingley and when she reads Jane’s letter from London in which Jane reports that the Bingley sisters snubbed her. Jane also concerns herself much with Elizabeth and making sure her happiness is secured. Towards the conclusion of the novel when Elizabeth tells Jane of her engagement with Darcy, Jane reacts by questioning her in order to make sure that her choice of spouse will make her content. Jane asks, “’And do you really love him quite well enough? Oh, Lizzy! Do any thing rather than marry without affection. Are you quite sure that you feel what you ought to do?’”(244). Jane’s needing an assurance from Elizabeth that she will in fact find happiness in the situation she has chosen for herself illustrates a real and sincere anxiety about Elizabeth having a partner in life who will give her what she deserves. (Analysis) The selfless concern that these two sisters feel for one another will translate into their relationships with their husbands. It is in Jane and Elizabeth’s nature to give themselves wholly to respected and beloved friends and feel their pains and disappointments as if they were their own. Thus, the intimate and loving bond that the sisters will share with their spouses will cause them to put aside their own worries and devote themselves completely to their husbands.

Middlebury College student, Class of 2005


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