Tag Archives: Veterinary Medicine

Deadline 11/15/19: Join the Health Professions Committee Selection Process

Are you interested in beginning medical, veterinary, or dental school in Fall 2021?

Candidates applying for entry to graduate school in the medical professions in the Fall of 2021 must complete the Matric 21: Middlebury Health Professions Committee Selection Form by November 15, 2019.

You can access the form here. Any questions? Email us at hprofess@middlebury.edu

SAVE THE DATE: University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine Admissions

Sponsored by The Pre-Health Society and the Center for Careers and Internships, Ms. Allison Keiter, an Admissions Counselor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, will offer a Zoom meeting with students in November. Come with questions and ready to learn more about the vet school admissions process!

  • WHERE: Adirondack House 218
  • WHEN: Thursday, November 14, 2019 from 12:30-1:20 PM

Midd Grads @ Med School

If you are in the process of applying to medical school (or thinking of applying in the future,) we have created a Google map of where Midd grads have matriculated to medical school over the last three years. The map will help you see where alumni are located. Simply click on the map pin and it will tell you what school and how many alumni matriculated that year. Keep an eye on the map as we will be adding DO, dental and veterinary schools as well.

Check out the Google map here.

How to Prepare for Phone or Virtual Interviews

Article by Aja Frost of The Muse.

“A colleague of mine once compared phone and Skype interviews to take-home tests.

“You still need to study,” she explained. “But you can also have everything you need in front of you.”

If you’re wondering what exactly is “everything you need” and how you should you prepare your materials so it’s not totally obvious you’re shuffling through papers or reading over your notes, good news—we’ve got all the answers to help you properly prepare for your next remote interview.” Read more.

Finding Shadowing Opportunities

Shadowing is the act of following a professional as they do their typical work activities in a clinic or hospital setting. You might ask why this experience is so important? First, it may be the defining experience which tells you whether or not you want to be a physician. Shadowing gives you a very tangible sense of what life is like for a professional. Through working alongside a professional, you can gain unique insight into what happens in a day in the life of your career of choice. You get a sense of what it’s like working with patients, working with other health care professionals (nurses, PAs, and therapists), and what the challenges and rewards are of working in the profession. You’ll learn how a health professional organizes their day, allows time for the unexpected, stays current in the profession, integrates personal and professional life, and manage the financial aspects of their practice.

Shadowing can also be crucial for a second reason: Having clinical experience allows admissions committees know that you have some understanding of what you are getting into. It also shows admissions officers your commitment to a health career because you have taken initiative in learning about being a professional prior to applying to school.

The AAMC also has a handout on Guidelines for Clinical Shadowing Experiences.

If you have any questions, please schedule an appointment with one of the advisors.

RIT’s Incredible Repository of Internships, Co-ops, and Research Opportunities

RIT’s Co-op/Internships and Summer Research Opportunities in the Life Sciences

All of the information in this post comes to you from our colleagues at RIT. You can view the full RIT page maintained by Tom Frederick here.

Lists also include Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) opportunities in:

All opportunities are PAID, unless otherwise indicated.

This Co-op website is organized into the categories below. Simply click on the underlined link to view the co-op posting category.

5 Things To Consider For a Productive Pre-Health Thanksgiving Break

1. Update Your Resume.

When applying for opportunities, your resume, cover letter, and application materials are your first impression. These documents will help you land an interview, so it is important to detail your experience and accomplishments clearly and concisely.

While there is no one right way to write a resume, there are guidelines you should follow to convey a positive, meaningful message. Additionally, for each position you apply for, you should write a new cover letter that is geared toward that specific job and company/organization.

To get started:

  • Review the Resume and Cover Letter Guide for all majors and industries. This guide outlines suggestions for formatting, organization, and content and can walk you through the process of creating either document. Included is also a list of action verbs.

  • Utilize the list of Core Professional Competencies to highlight the skills you have gained during your experiences

  • View resume samples here

2. Start a First Draft of Your Personal Statement.

It is never too early to work on your personal statement. Starting early can relieve a lot of stress when it comes down to the application cycle. Starting early allows you to have family, friends, and your advisors read it over. Expect there will be many drafts over time. Learn from the experts:

3. Volunteer.

Use your break to dip your toe into a service opportunity. Or research where you’d like to volunteer when you return to campus. Service of some kind is fully integrated into the health care professional’s undergraduate experience. Most applicants have a strong sense of service, of wanting to help others feel better, making health care work better, and, in many cases, giving back to their communities. There are many ways for you to engage in the community and you can design your own service path. Admissions boards value engagement in community service as a way to demonstrate respect toward others with very different life circumstances, empathy, and cultural sensitivity. They want students to demonstrate a desire to help others and sensitivity to others’ needs and feelings. Ideal applicants demonstrate a desire to alleviate others’ distress; recognize and act on his/her responsibilities to society, locally, nationally, and globally. The average medical school applicant has 100 hours of community service when they apply.

4. Shadow.

Again, consider using this time to research clinical shadowing experiences. A strong emphasis is placed on your clinical exposure to medicine and patient care, including time spent shadowing, working in clinics, and other patient-care settings. Clinical experience is defined as direct interaction with patients and hands-on involvement in the care of conscious patients in a health care related environment, attending to their health maintenance, progression, or end of life needs. The average applicant has 45-50 hours of patient contact.

5. Take a break, have fun, be yourself.

Spend time relaxing and celebrating with family and friends. After giving your all these last few months, you deserve it!