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Community Partner Feature – Wild Roots Farm VT

Jon Turner, of Wild Roots Farm in Bristol, is coming to campus on Friday, Feb. 24 to host a workshop called Fundamentals of Design: Permaculture and Regenerative Agriculture

Friday, Feb. 24

4:30-6:30pm

Axinn 219

90% of mistakes can be prevented with an efficient design. This workshop will give you an understanding of different ways to view the landscape and how the site can influence a successful design. We will discuss permaculture principles and how to apply them to this process, while also providing case studies of the effectiveness of ecological design.

*Wild Roots Farm VT 2017 Regeneration Workshop Series*
Learn more about Wild Roots Farm VT here: https://www.facebook.com/WildRootsFarmVermont/
Cultivating Mushrooms: Substrates & Soil
March 11
Hands on
Resilient Farm Systems: Mindfulness in the Field
April 8
Designing and Building the Forest Garden
May 13- 14
Hands on
Improving Your Soil: Biologically Charged Garden Beds
June 10
Storing Carbon/ Utilizing Nutrients: Waste as a Resource
July 8
Hands on
Pollinator Habitat & Forage Strips
August 12
Pasture Management & Livestock Integration
September 9
*Public Gatherings*
Veterans Regeneration Benefit
May 26
-proceeds will go to a local project
Know Your Farmer Market Day
July 8
-sample local food and meet the farmers who helped produce it
2nd Annual Harvest Potluck and Hoedown
September 30
-food, music and lots of family

Chicago Posse 5 Community Supper – Reflection by Arturo Simental

On Sunday, January 17th, my Posse and I (first years from Chicago) participated in a community supper at the Congregational Church. After weeks of planning and some initial preparation the night before in the form of creating a music playlist, grocery shopping, and baking ten dozen brownies, our group was excited to work together serving the Middlebury Community. To make operations smoother, we divided into different roles: dishwashers, cooks, cutters, and servers. We began our day setting up the long meal tables with floral decorations and tableware. Other members of the Middlebury community, friends, and community leaders assisted us.

Our menu consisted of chicken parmesan, two types of pasta, salad, bread, clementine, and chocolate desserts. Preparing the food for 200 community members taught us how to work effectively as a team and be diligent. Knowing each other well through Posse made it quicker to work and be honest about what we needed from each other to serve everyone who expected a good meal. The biggest lesson of the community supper was acknowledging how important it is to engage with community members that aren’t students of Middlebury College. Living in a college campus often blinds us from connecting with Vermont locals and learning about their challenges and hearing their stories. We all learned how hardworking the community members are and we put to rest any preconceived notions we had of the community; we found that there is tremendous diversity in the Vermont experience. Engaging with the community gave us a new understanding of Addison County and opened our eyes to the privileges we have being in Middlebury as students and how beneficial it can be to reach out and have events that give back to community members. After cleaning up and reflecting on our experience the following week, we hope to further our community engagement with locals and demonstrate our leadership as Posse scholars!

Thanks, in part, to the Service Cluster Board Flex Fund for the generous grant to help make purchasing groceries possible, and to the Charter House Coalition and Congregational Church team for welcoming us so warmly.

Which Mac Is Right For You?

Which Mac is the right one to buy?

 

Here are a few questions to ask yourself ~

Will I need a faster Mac with the latest technology or do I use only the basics with my Mac?

If you do a lot of research with many windows open to compare sites for class as well as run software like Photoshop, Final Cut Pro or InDesign for video and photo editing, or even possibly using software for Business Management or Accounting like QuickBooks where more RAM and processing speed is required, then you will want the MacBook Pro over the MacBook or the MacBook Air.  More RAM (which is the temporary memory on a computer) allows for more windows open for doing a lot of research while listening to your music, or streaming movies and certain software requires more RAM for optimal performance.   Mac’s with a faster processor, like the new 13” and 15” Mac with Touch Bar, can process data at faster speeds like compressing audio files, adjusting photos, or converting video files and a faster processor can even boot up your laptop quicker.

What if I only use my laptop for internet access for things like doing a little research for class or watching movies or getting my email?

Unless you want the versatility of the MacBook Pro for future possibilities of career related responsibilities, the MacBook or the MacBook Air might be a good solution.   Priced at lower costs, the MacBook Air is widely one of the favorites here at Middlebury and perfect for the average user due to its light weight of just under 3 pounds.  For an even lighter Mac, the 12” MacBook with Retina Display and more storage is another alternative and it comes in a choice of either Rose, Silver, Gold or Space Gray colors.

I really can’t spend that much for a new Mac but need the faster processing power.

The MacBook Pro 13”128GB with 2.7GHz Dual-core i5 processor or the 15” 256GB with 2.2GHz Quad-core i7 processor are priced at $1199.00 and $1699.00 (respectively) and both offer fast processors and Retina Display.

Below is a comparison sheet of Graphics, RAM, Storage capacity, Weight and Color choice-

Rotimi Agbabiaka: Student-Initiated Rothrock Residencies 2017

Rotimi Agbabiaka’s Middlebury visit is a student-initiated residency spearheaded by Akhila Khanna ’17, supported by the Rothrock Family Fund for Experiential Learning in the Performing Arts, established in 2011, which supports student opportunities that broaden the scope of Middlebury students’ experiences in the performing arts. It is also supports by Chellis House and Women of Color.


March 9, Thursday
Type/Caste
Performed by Rotimi Agbabiaka
8:00 PM, Wilson Hall, McCullough Student Center
A queer, black actor dreams of a dazzling career on the American stage but first he’ll have to leap over obstacles placed by an industry that isn’t always welcoming to applicants who are neither white nor straight.  Based on Rotimi Agbabiaka’s real life experience as a professional actor, Type/Caste is a fast paced and humorous journey into the peaks, pitfalls and hallucinations of a young artist’s quest for success in a gentrified and commercialized industry. Agbabiaka shape-shifts from character to character and uses monologue, song, dance, and drag to embody, explore, and expose the battles minority artists fight in the exclusive world of mainstream American theatre. Hailed as “a spectacular, neon-drenched coup-de-theatre” by 48 Hills magazine. Agbabiaka’s Middlebury visit is a student-initiated residency spearheaded by Akhila Khanna ’17, supported by the Rothrock Family Fund for Experiential Learning in the Performing Arts, Chellis House, and Women of Color. Free. Open to Middlebury ID card holders only.

March 10, Friday
Master Class by Rotimi Agbabiaka: Techniques of Telling your own Story
2:00-5:00 PM, MCA Room 232
Actor/writer/director Rotimi Agbabiaka offers a theatre master class for Middlebury College students following his Type/Caste performance the previous evening. Free. Middlebury ID card holders can sign up here>> to participate. 

Artist website>>

Artist bio:
Rotimi Agbabiaka was born in Lagos, Nigeria and moved to Katy, Texas at the age of fourteen where he stumbled upon a theatre audition while waiting for his mom to pick him up after school. He got cast in the pivotal role of “Hotel Clerk” in Douglas Carter Beane’s “As Bees In Honey Drown” and has never looked back.

After studying English, Economics and Plan II at the University of Texas – Austin, Rotimi reliquinshed all plans for future financial stability and braved the frozen cornfields of the mid-west to earn an MFA in Acting from Northern Illinois University.

He then moved to sometimes sunny San Francisco where he has performed in a variety of venues – from historical musical revues (Beach Blanket Babylon) to local parks (with the San Francisco Mime Troupe) to museums (The DeYoung) to reknowned regional theatres (Cal Shakes, Marin Theatre Company, Magic Theatre) to smaller local companies and the occasional nightclub.

He has written a solo play, Homeless, that won Best Solo Performance at the SF Fringe Festival, directed plays in the SF One Minute Play Festival, writes articles for Theatre Bay Area , and teaches youth theatre programs through San Francisco Shakespeare Company, Each One Reach One, and the SF Mime Troupe, where he is a Collective Member.

 

Why Putting Bannon On The NSC Is Probably A Good Idea

With the media firestorm generated by President Trump’s executive order on immigration, some news outlets were slow to pick up on another controversial and potentially more important president directive: Presidential National Security Memorandum 2, which Trump issued two days ago.  That presidential memorandum (contrary to this New York Times article, it was not an executive […]

CCE Mini Grant Reflection by Rebecca Duras: Letter drop at Congressman Welch’s and Senator Leahy’s offices, Burlington

On Veteran’s Day, 2016, the Middlebury chapter of Young Progressives Demanding Action (YPDA) organized a trip to the Burlington offices of Congressman Peter Welch and Senator Patrick Leahy to deliver letters calling for them to oppose the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which not only threatens the environment but desecrates Native American land protected by a treaty. The letter drop was planned before the election results, but the election of Donald Trump, who not only promised he will support the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline but stated that he will overturn President Obama’s executive order blocking the Keystone XL Pipeline, made the day of action even more pressing. Of all the things that could happen under a Trump administration, the damage done to the environment is one of the most powerful because we are at a turning point environmentally and if swift action is not taken now, our environment will become permanently damaged beyond repair.

After the letter drop was completed, the members of MiddYPDA attended the Burlington “Love Trumps Hate” rally  to show our support for those who are most vulnerable by Trump’s administration. The rally in Burlington’s City Hall Park was peaceful, with many speakers sharing their fears of what might come as well as their hopes for a future America that is vigilant in the face of injustice and many shared tips for helping the most vulnerable.