Tag Archives: teaching

Teaching Opportunities in Handshake for Seniors

There are some compelling Fellowship teaching opportunities listed on Handshake that might be of interest to students interested in teaching in urban settings. Here are a few links to opportunities with upcoming application deadlines:

#1039546 AmeriCorps Urban Education Fellowship at Phoenix Charter Academy

The Phoenix Academy Network currently operates three high schools in Massachusetts – one in Chelsea, one in Lawrence and one in Springfield – with plans to open additional schools in the coming years. The Phoenix Network is at the forefront of education, particularly alternative education, in Massachusetts.

#268486 Teaching Fellows Program at Grace Academy Hartford

Grace Academy is a tuition-free middle school serving underprivileged girls in Hartford. The all-girls’ school is part of the 70 school NativityMiguel Network which has a track record of success in inner city areas across the states. Grace Academy opened in 2010 and serves girls grade five through eight. We remain intentionally small with just 15 students per grade. Grace Academy allows girls to: excel academically; develop a sense of personal responsibility and character; and be the agents of transformation in their families, community and society.

The Fellows Program…
Individuals, who are interested in social justice and have a passion for working with adolescents, are hired as resident interns and receive training and support through our Teacher Fellows Program. Fellows play an integral part in the life of our school, work as full-time teachers and coaches, and receive teacher training and support.

#1048285 2-Year Teaching Fellowship at Crane Country Day School

Applicants to Crane’s Center for Experiential Education are a diverse group of open-minded, confident, passionate individuals who find themselves at a pivotal moment in their professional lives. They care deeply about children, they are excited about schools and learning, they are both reflective and imaginative, and they are serious about becoming teachers.

All applicants need to be college graduates who have some beginning experience working with children. Previous coursework in the field of education is not necessary. This is a residential program and our teaching fellows will live in a beautiful furnished home adjacent to the Crane campus. This is a two-year, full-time, salaried program.

#822229 Math/Science Resident Teacher (Fellowship: M.Ed & Certificate) at Temple Teacher Residency

Passionate about math, science, or engineering? Want to improve the lives of Philadelphia’s youth? Temple Teacher Residency (TTR) is an innovative program devoted to improving STEM education in Philadelphia.  TTR is looking for strong math, science, and engineering majors and minors (or alumni) who are passionate about inspiring Philadelphia’s middle grades students. We will provide you the experience you need to become a leader in the classroom.

Fellows (“Residents”) spend the year learning from a mentor teacher in a Philadelphia classroom while taking classes at Temple, earning a master’s degree in education, PA middle grades teaching certification, and up to $20,000 in tuition and living support.

Come Learn About Different Teaching Opportunities: October/November Events

There are enough events on the calendar and employers coming to campus  that we could almost declare October to be Careers in Teaching month, but because some of these events will actually happen in early November and continue through till spring, that would be misleading! Please join our upcoming guest on campus, mostly private school placement & coaching firms and also a neat alumni panel facilitated through the Education Studies department. Mark your calendars and sign up for jobs posted on Handshake.

Information Session: Carney, Sandoe & Associates

Career Services Library Adirondack House 

October 17, 2017 at 7:00 pm EDT

 Carney, Sandoe & Associates is an educational recruitment firm that places teachers and administrators in private, independent and like-kind (charter, magnet, pilot and merit) schools across the nation.

Information Session: Search Associates: 

Career Services Library Adirondack House 

October 18, 2017 at 7:00 pm EDT

**Information session to present opportunities for a paid academic year teaching in international schools worldwide. This is an opportunity that is new to Middlebury students and in an incredible launching pad for those of you interested in teaching abroad, but not necessarily teaching just English language skills but in a subject of your choice.

INTERVIEWS: Teaching Intern in International English-language K-12 Schools worldwide

ADK Interview Room 106

October 19, 2017 from 9:00-5:00 pm EDT

There are 15 minute interviews scheduled with the internship coordinator, Diana Kerry. Sign up for interviews on Handshake here: https://middlebury.joinhandshake.com/jobs/1034779/share_preview.

 

 “Midd Alums Talk About Teaching” Alumni Panel

Education Studies Department Twilight Auditorium 101

October 26, 2017 at 7:30 pm EDT

Alumni Panel explores the challenges and rewards of the education field.

 

Navigating Your Job Search in Independent Schools with Educators Ally

Career Services Library Adirondack House 

October 30, 2017 at 6:00 pm EDT

 Thinking about pursuing jobs in independent schools including teaching, coaching, admissions, or development? Please join the Educator’s Ally Team for guidance and counsel on “Navigating Your Job Search in Independent Schools” and learn how to best position yourself for a successful job search.

 

John King, Director PLAN A HEAD, LLC Independent School Counsel & Placement

Career Services Library Adirondack House 

November 1, 2017 at 5:30 pm EDT

 A Life and Career as an Independent School Teacher, Coach, or Administrator: The joys and challenges of working with young people in an independent school community. What does it take? Is it for you? Longtime School Heads will share their perspective and advice on what it takes to be an inspirational teacher.

Seniors: Work for an Outdoor Educational Semester Program @ High Mountain Institute

High Mountain Institute – Info Session Come join The High Mountain Institute TODAY, Wednesday, Dec. 2nd, 7-8:00 p.m. in MBH219. HMI is an outdoor-oriented educational non-profit located in Leadville, CO. HMI’s Apprentice Program offers college graduates the unique opportunity to explore

The cleaner who became a teacher

They say your first job is meant to be awful. It is clear that more often than not your first job will not guarantee you a sense of fulfillment; it is simply a milestone on the path to personal triumph.

I started working in the ninth grade.

My first job was as a cleaner in the house and office of my employer. I would go there two to three times per week after school, dust the furniture, mop the floors and clean the space in front of the building. At first I was quite ashamed to tell my friends what I did, but soon I realized that there is no bad job when you earn money in an honest way through labor and diligence. I worked there for a year and a half and while it remained a stagnant, unstimulating position throughout this time, I did like the opportunity to exercise being happy in disadvantageous conditions. I reflect on those times with appreciation.

228168_475160032518884_1363675462_nMy second job was as a children’s party entertainer. I have worked for a lot of party companies over the past few years and I planned and hosted parties for my young guests on my own. My tasks were to make the decorations, welcome the guests and then organize games and dancing. It took quite a measure of responsibility as well, as it’s easy for children lost in the gleeful moments of a new game to injure themselves. I really liked the fact that I could be creative and always come up with new ideas for games or themed parties. What excited me the most is that games can be not only fun, but educational as well. I paid particular attention to innovations in the field of Gamification, my interest being captured both by its practical implications and its psychological context.

250593_2014367969855_7390944_nIn 2011 I started working as Manager of Youth Activities for an NGO called NC Future Now. I would meet young people to familiarize them with the different programs and projects, in which they could take part, promote our work in radios and TV shows, organize events, etc. I loved this job, as my tasks were very similar to what I’d been doing in my own charity—the only difference being that I was paid for it!

One of my most important tasks during I worked there was to get an accreditation for the organization to host and send volunteers through the European Voluntary Service (an EU funded program). I not only succeeded to get the accreditation from the institution that was reviewing the applications, but was even invited to attend a training course for youth workers in France where, to no surprise, I was the youngest participant.

***

I was in the 8th grade when I first watched “Pay it Forward”. I was greatly inspired, and started dreaming of becoming a teacher myself someday: being able to inspire my students and attune their mindsets so that they can see all the possibilities there are in the world and do the best with their potential.

In the second term of my senior year I started working as a part-time lecturer in a school close to our capital, Sofia as a part of Bulgaria’s Ministry of Education program for informal education integrated in the classroom. I had two groups of students whom I met twice a week. I taught Dance Therapy (Metadance) classes with my second graders as well as supervised a Club of Young Travelers in English with students from the sixth, seventh, and eighth grades.

430154_3408396379694_953265264_nMy Dance Therapy group consisted of fifteen lively, lovely and extremely loud and full of energy second graders. The program consisted mainly of workshops exploring movement and various dance exercises aimed to establish trust between students, reduce stress, overcome barriers in communication caused by prejudices towards children from the minorities; transform their energy and guide it into positive social actions and creativity, thus decreasing the outbursts of violation between the students. I was especially satisfied by the student’s positive reaction towards group discussions after each exercise, in which they shared interesting insights.

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551103_3495544038331_1314023837_nWith my older students age 13-15 my real challenges and successes began. I easily attracted their attention not only with my age being close to theirs, but especially with my impressive travel history. When I told them what I planned our classes to be like, they hardly believed me as they never before had acquainted themselves with informal education. Speaking English in class was as exciting for some as difficult and troublesome for others.

dsc02862The principal of the school had put some of the most difficult students in my group just so that there would be sufficient number of students. Nobody expected anything of me, but I found that a good possibility for me to show them more than they could have ever expected. Soon, I started bringing foreigners to our little school, setting up presentations about Algeria, Mexico, UK, and Morocco, attracting students from the other classes as well. A graduate from my high school who knew thirty-five languages made a great presentation on the process of learning languages.

dsc02940Some of the boys in the group were quite hard to handle, but being open and honest were my strongest instruments. I remember one of these clever, but lazy and unbelieving boys asking me why I have come to work with students who are ill-behaved and careless. I told him then that I believe in people and their potential and that I think that many times it is not that people are bad, but that for different reasons they wear masks of negativity not to be hurt, or just so that the others will like them. All of the boys were listening quietly and I was sure they understood me perfectly.

My teaching experience was a process of learning all the time both for my students and for me. There was a girl whom I let come into my classes even though she didn’t sign up in the beginning, but she actually distracted the boys and was not really interested in what we were doing. On one of the first class trips, I decided that it would be better to not take her with us so that the boys would be more concentrated. That turned out to be a decision with consequences: the two boys that I spent so much effort to engage decided not to come to class anymore. I apologized to them, thus not only learning a lesson myself, but also showing them what the right thing to do is when you are wrong.

dsc03066Through watching short movies, making presentations, engaging into fun exercises with educational content and most importantly- sharing opinions and learning from each other, I think I succeeded helping them realize that they should learn less for grades and more for themselves. I taught them they needed to be open-minded, aware of their stereotypes, responsible of their behavior and the way it affects others, and most importantly that the world has much to offer if only they are willing to work for it.

Being an educator is by all means my favorite occupation. Leading workshops for young adults during exchange programs as part of my extracurricular activities and having this amazing and transforming experience in the school gives me the confidence I am on the right track of what I want to do in my life and what the change I want to make in the world is. Improving educational systems, developing new educational tools and practices and leading people towards awareness of their need to develop is what truly makes me happy and willing to go on.

Going back hapily with the final result Organized a street action: everyone drawing together on the topic of "How will a better world look like?"" dsc03151 drawing and inviting people to share their positive message Trying out meditation Boat sailing during one of our trips

 

♥Maggie Nazer is a social entrepreneur, activist, blogger and current Middlebury college student.


Interested in sustainability and education?

There’s a winter term internship for that.

The Teton Science Schools are offering two internship opportunities to work with sustainability and education in Kelly, Wyoming over J-Term. Yes, really.

As an intern, you will have the chance to work on the school’s sustainability audit (STARS) and the development of a Sustainability Report, describing the outcomes of the audit and the school’s efforts towards sustainability. As part of this program, you will have the option to take a Winter Ecology Course (3-9 days) and work on the development of sustainability curriculum within the Field Education Program, including exploring pedagogy and field teaching, depending on your interests.

Interested? Of course you are. Head to MOJO today to apply!

In Their Own Words: Alice Oshima ’15

“In Their Own Words” is an ongoing series featuring the experiences of Middlebury students at their summer internships. This summer Alice Oshima ‘15 interned with the Harlem Community Justice Center in New York City.

What did you do?

This summer, I interned with the Harlem Community Justice Center, which is part of the umbrella organization the Center for Court Innovation. Inside the Harlem Community Justice Center, there is a housing court, a family court, a re-entry court, and a youth court. The housing, family, and re-entry courts operate as legitimate New York State courts, but with a specific focus on restorative justice. The youth court on the other hand, which is the program I was working with, works outside the court system and relies of referrals from precincts, the law department, and schools. For my internship, I worked with my supervisor and two other interns to facilitators the trainings of the youth court members. I lead ice-breakers or warm-ups before most sessions—one of the most popular of which was the Enneagram personality test. I facilitated the introductory training, as well as trainings on appropriate sanctions, perceptions and assumptions, and jury deliberation. These lessons were based on the youth court training curriculum created by the Center for Court Innovation, but I was encouraged to make any changes or additions I saw fit. In addition to these curriculum-based trainings, I helped facilitate a session on feminism and gender roles created by a fellow intern. I also began developing curriculum for workshops on mental health and teenagers, and race and the criminal justice system, but was unable to finish and facilitate them due to time. I researched and compiled a list of suggest videos for the training sessions or for the coming year—this list included TED talks, spoken word poems, and documentary clips.

What did you learn?

Before this internship, I had very little knowledge regarding the logistics of our criminal justice system, as well as the flaws with this system. From leading training sessions, and watching my supervisor and fellow interns lead sessions, I learned a great deal about how the court system works and the possibilities offered by restorative justice, but also about some of the shortcomings of the current restorative justice projects available. The internship also gave me experience modifying curriculum, teaching lessons, and in general, working with young people. These experience was very educational, as well as fun! But it was also my first time doing any of these things, and so with time, I think I would have gotten better at making the lesson plans even more dynamic and fully engaging all of the youth. Although I feel I made progress, as a teacher, there is still a lot a lot of work for me to be done.

What are your plans for the future?

In terms of my future plans, I do not plan to specifically focus on restorative justice as a career, but I plan to be involved in social activism for my lifetime and engage with the mass incarceration of predominantly black and Latino men in this country, and the major flaws in our criminal justice system in general, are issues that I hope to continue to be work with in the future. I also am highly considering either being a New York City public high school teacher, or working with high-school aged youth in some other capacity, and so the experience I gained working with that age group will definitely be valuable.

Think this experience sounded pretty cool? Check out opportunities like this and more on MOJO.