Tag Archives: science

Gaining Experience in STEM Fields: Psychology

Psychology is one of the top three undergraduate majors in the U.S. and growing at a rate of 19%. Psychology students graduate with in-depth knowledge about human behavior, which is a skill ALL employers are looking for no matter what career path you are interested in. This skill makes graduates especially well-equipped for a wide range of careers after graduation. In addition to the training in human behavior, a bachelor’s degree in psychology gives you a wide range of skills in critical thinking, writing, problem solving, research, and synthesizing information.

What skills does studying psychology develop?

  • writing
  • critical thinking
  • time management
  • reasoning
  • communication
  • research
  • analysis
  • problem solving
  • prioritization
  • leadership and team management

What kind of societies and professional organizations do psychology majors have?

Summer Opportunities

Additional Career Resources

Connect with a Midd Alum doing legislative and government affairs work in VT

Shelley Sayward is Vice President and Assistant General Counsel at Casella Waste Systems, Inc. in Rutland, Vermont. She received her B.A. from Middlebury College in 1996 and launched into an eight year career in sales and marketing before commencing a four year law clerkship program in the State of Vermont.

Shelley has held multiple roles in the Casella legal department and became a member of the Vermont Bar in 2008. She received her SHRM-SCP and SPHR designation in April 2015 and is the Legislative and Government Affairs Director on the SHRM Vermont State Council.

She is on campus as part of the Geology Field Guide event! Read more below, including the link to sign up for a 1:1 chat with her on Tuesday morning.

Alumni will be on campus to share their path and professional life with students to help them think broadly about their Geology major and a variety of different career paths. Events are February 18 and 19, 2019.

What did they do at Middlebury and what are they doing now?
Find out at these events!

Monday, February 18, 2019

Alumni Panel and Dinner,  6:00 p.m.
Atwater Dining Hall
Reserve your spot, RSVP in Handshake!

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

1:1 Alumni Chats, 9:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Adirondack House – Click the alumni names below to SELECT A SLOT for a 1:1 conversation.

Participating Alumni:

Click here to learn more about our alumni panelists!

You don’t have to be a Geology major to meet with these alumni.

Click on their names below to sign up for 1:1 appointments in Handshake.

This is a unique opportunity for current students to hear from Middlebury alumni at the top of their fields about how to build a successful and gratifying career.

Biomechanics Team Research Assistant at ORISE Department of Defense

Applications are now being accepted for a research assistant in biomechanics at the U.S. Army Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM), located in Natick, MA, USA. The mission of USARIEM is to optimize Warfighter health and performance through medical research (www.usariem.army.mil).

As military readiness is a top priority, the ideal candidate will assist in conducting research on the biomechanics of overuse injury risk with a focus on the lower extremities.

This individual will participate in research activities ranging from study conception to data collection and analysis to manuscript publication.

Appointments will be awarded for 1 year, potentially renewable up to 4 years, and will be offered through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

Current research protocols include exploring associations of human movement (walking, load carriage and running), performance and musculoskeletal injury risk utilizing standard motion capture techniques and inertial measurement units (IMUs). The individual will assist with additional activities necessary to enable data collection including IRB paperwork, subject scheduling and coordinating study team member schedules for data collections. The individual will process and analyze motion capture and IMU data plus write-up and present results in abstracts and at conferences.

Learn more in Handshake. Application deadline 2/28.

Summer BBS Biological Technician Positions Open with the USGS

This opportunity is brought to you by Emilie Seavey ’18!

The USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland is seeking to hire two full-time temporary student contractors to assist with the North American Breeding Bird Survey program, a long-term, continental avian monitoring program. Tasks will include working with wildlife survey data, processing incoming data forms, performance of quality assurance and quality control procedures on biological data, data entry, assisting with database management, photocopying and filing, preparation of maps and assisting in preparation of administrative correspondence.

Application deadline is February 25.

Types of services required: During the summer field season, approximately 3100 BBS routes are sampled by participants skilled in avian identification. These data are then processed and analyzed by USGS to inform avian conservation efforts in the U.S. and Canada. Tasks will include processing incoming data and materials, performing data entry and quality control procedures using web-based technologies, tracking progress, assisting with database management, photocopying, scanning and filing materials, map preparation, and corresponding with participants.

Required skills:

  • Applicants are required to have completed two years of undergraduate course work (student must be at least a second semester sophomore).
  • Must be majoring in biology, ecology, environmental science, or related discipline.
  • Must have knowledge of computer software used to summarize and organize data.

Eligibility requirements: To be eligible for a student contract position, applicants must be either a currently enrolled student or a recent graduate. Non-U.S. citizens may be eligible to participate, depending on their immigration status and the applicable regulations of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (formerly Immigration and Naturalization Service). Foreign students in the U.S. under F-1 visas are usually not able to participate in this program, due to USCIS restrictions against off-campus work.

Compensation: The student contractor will be paid $17.09 per hour. (Estimated number of hours for the position is 544. There is a possibility of additional part-time hours continuing into the fall semester.) Student contractors are paid only for hours worked (no holiday or leave benefits). Student is responsible for all costs of transportation to and from the principal duty station location. The Government does not provide housing, meals or other living expenses while working at the principal duty station. Official travel away from the duty station is not expected.

Approximate dates are May 28-August 23, 2019. There is flexibility in start and end dates to accommodate variations in academic calendars.

Send resume and cover letter to Keith Pardieck via email. Applications must be received on or before February 25, 2019. In your cover letter include an explanation of how you meet the eligibility requirements, your expected graduation date, and discuss your experience as related to required services and skills listed above.

Middlebury Social Impact Corps – Student Info Sessions

Middlebury Social Impact Corps – Student Info Sessions. 

Sign up on Handshake by clicking the date you plan to attend.

Middlebury Social Impact Corps connects students to the front line of social change with unique global internship opportunities. A select cohort of Middlebury College and MIIS graduate students are chosen and matched with a social enterprise or NGO for an 8 week international summer internship. The program is an entry point to gaining deeper understanding and curating the tools needed to lead a purpose-driven career where participants receive tangible work experience with a social impact. 2019 partners: Impact Monterey County (in Monterey, CA), Andean Alliance for Sustainable Development (in Cuzco, Peru) and Cape Eleuthera Institute (in Eleuthera, Bahamas)

Come learn more about the program, host sites, and how to apply! Check out the details of each one here on Handshake:

Impact Monterey County

Andean Alliance for Sustainable Development

Cape Eleuthera Institute

How Will You Find Your Next Internship or Job? Networking, Probably.

Your Professional Network Is Bigger Than You Think – Here are the CCI’s Networking Tips!

Networking: What Is It?

Simply put, it’s reaching out to people with whom you share a connection to learn new information. Sometimes that’s about internships and jobs, majors and careers, but sometimes it’s about where to find an apartment in a new city—or a great restaurant, or a place to get your hair cut. We are all “networking” all the time!

Your share a connection to Middlebury with 7,500+ alumni career volunteers. They want to hear from you about your career aspirations and challenges. They also want to know what’s happening on campus: you’ve got something to offer them as well. Below are some tips to help you make the most out of these valuable exchanges.

Networking Shortcuts

Check out the 5-Minute Career Clips (online workshops) for a brief step-by-step guide to conducting a networking conversation.

Check out these examples of how to write an e-mail introducing yourself to a Middlebury Alumni volunteer.

But first, make it count!

Before you make that contact or attend a networking event, be sure
that you are practiced and confident in your networking skills.

Know yourself: your competencies and relevant skills. Know what you want to learn about: which industry or career area interests you.

Why Network? Three Compelling Reasons

1. Most job opportunities (70 percent) are uncovered through networking: More jobs are found this way than through the “want ads,” or company websites, or even through online job-listing sites. Although you’ll want to use all of these channels in your job search, your time is best invested in networking and developing personal connections through your growing network.

2. Most job hunters don’t know enough about the jobs they are pursuing: Networking to gather this information enables you to better articulate why you are a good “fit” for the job—and this makes you a more competitive candidate.

3. Hiring is risky and expensive for employers: If you are referred to an employer by someone that person knows and trusts, then you are a “safer bet” and a more attractive candidate.

Your Two Goals for Networking

  • Gather “insider” career information and advice from people who work in the career area or company that you’ve targeted as your interest.
  • Gain referrals (connections) to other people who can also provide career advice and information.

Before You Start

  • Identify your career-related interests, skills, and values to establish a meaningful discussion with your networks. The list of Core Professional Competencies will help you identify the skills you’ve developed as a liberal arts student.
  • Research industries and companies, using the CCI Career Library.
  • Identify appropriate contacts in the industries and/or companies that interest you, using MiddNet, professors, family, friends, etc.

Networking Does Not Mean Asking for a Job!

Networking is an essential part of your job-search strategy, but asking directly for a job is not effective networking. This is true for a number of reasons:

  1. To ask directly will likely be off-putting to your contact, who might feel put on the spot. Unless the person knows you, why would she be willing to risk her reputation by referring you to a job lead? On the other hand, nearly everyone is willing to share information and advice with you. Ask for, and learn from, the information and advice offered you—and if the contact is impressed with you and your conversation, and if she does know of a job lead, she may then be inclined to share that lead with you.
  2. If you ask directly for a job and if the answer to your question is “no,” then the conversation becomes a dead end. This misses the opportunity to create a connection with the person or to gain other referrals to other potential contacts.
  3. Limiting your networking connections only to those contacts whom you think may have job leads for you, severely limits the number of connections you can make and hampers your ability to gain important information and advice about the industry, field, or company that you are researching


Remember, letting people know that you are looking for a job is not the same as asking them for a job! Learn more on the CCI website.

Middlebury FoodWorks – Summer Internship and Leadership Program in Food Systems

June 3-July 26. Paid internship for 30 hours a week for 8 weeks. Housing included. 2019 applications are now being accepted on a rolling basis! Placement dependent on being hired at internship.

Middlebury FoodWorks was established in 2012 as an innovative summer leadership program combining academic and experiential learning in food systems. The internship opportunities enhance student learning and engagement in food studies. Middlebury, Vermont offers dynamic opportunities to engage in unique food systems. Paid internship for 30 hours/week for eight weeks June 3-July 26. Includes 4 guided food systems day trips. Only open to Middlebury students.

COMPENSATION:  This internship includes paid housing at Weybridge House, in addition to the $2640 stipend. If you are offered and accept this internship, please be aware that you will be required to complete the funded internship paperwork.

Apply in Handshake.

For more information contact Sophie Esser Calvi, FoodWorks Director.