Tags » research

 
 
 

Monterey Terrorism Research and Education Program

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

One of the Internet resources featured in the latest issue of the Internet Scout Report, at http://scout.wisc.edu/Reports/ScoutReport/2010/scout-100402.html, is the Monterey Terrorism Research & Education Program, at http://www.miis.edu/academics/researchcenters/terrorism.  Based at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, the Monterey Terrorism Research & Education Program (MonTREP) “conducts in-depth research, assesses policy options, and engages in public education on issues relating to terrorism and international security.”  Their team of scholars looks at violence-prone extremist groups and their historical evolution, organization structure, and operational methods. Most people will want to look at their Islam, Islamism, and Politics in Eurasia Reports (IIPER).  The IIPER is a bimonthly compendium of news and analysis on politics involving Islam in the former Soviet Union.  The reports are written and edited by Dr. Gordon M. Hahn, and the series also accepts independent submissions as well. Visitors are welcome to browse through the reports here, and they may end up forwarding them to friends and associates. Finally, the site also includes a “News & Student Stories” area which reports on the activities of current members of the team, alumni, and students.

For Women’s History Month: an Online Resource

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

In honor of Women’s History Month (March), you might want to visit the Library’s online subscription to: Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000.

This is a resource for students and scholars of U.S. history and U.S. women’s history. Organized around the history of women in social movements in the U.S. between 1600 and 2000, the collection  currently includes 91 document projects and archives with more than 3,600 documents and 150,000 pages of additional full-text documents, and more than 2,060 primary authors. It also includes book, film, and website reviews, notes from the archives, and teaching tools.

Quick-Start Guide for new library web site

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Our updated Quick-Start Guide to Library Research [pdf] provides:

  • a screenshot “map” of research resources in the new library web site
  • step-by-step instructions for finding journal articles

We often use this guide as a handout in research workshops.  It prints on one page, double-sided.  Please use it and distribute it widely!

And that’s the news for today…

Looking for the latest news? Just as nationally the number of dailies and weeklies available at the newsstand, the local drugstore or delivered to your doorstep has decreased in recent years, so too has the number of paper subscriptions that the library receives and puts out on the shelves in the Harman Reading room. But access to news from both the United States and around the world, current and archival, has actually increased through the library’s subscriptions to news databases. To locate and explore the wealth of news sources available to you through the library portal follow the link to the newspaper guide. And keep up with the latest political scandal, cricket scores or just compare sources for accuracy and bias.

How is Google Apps Different?

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Google Apps doesn’t offer any tools or services that you can’t find anywhere else.  As well, many of the Google Apps do not offer as many features as comparable applications from other vendors do.  For example, Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint offer many more features than their Google App equivalents. However, Google Apps for many people is “good enough” now to meet most of their needs.  More importantly, Google Apps is continually evolving, adding new features and documents/spreadsheets and presentation made in Google Apps can be exported to many common formats such as .doc, .xls, .pdf… etc.

What really distinguishes Google Apps is real-time collaboration.  That is to say, many people can work on the same document, spreadsheet, presentation or site at the same time.  Google apps keeps track of all changes and allows collaborators to compare different versions and roll-back to earlier versions much like a wiki. Google apps lets you specify exactly who can access your documents/spreadsheets and presentations and what type of access they have (view or edit).

The implications of real-time collaboration on teaching, learning and research are profound.  Faculty can give students feedback directly into the same documents that their students are composing in via inline comments.  Students can collaborate on group projects and assignments.  Faculty, staff and adminstrators can collaborate on research, grant proposals, initiatives and so on.

It isn’t that people couldn’t collaborate in the past, but that tools like Google Apps greatly reduces the barriers to collaboration, eliminating the need to exchange copies of documents, coordinate editing efforts, keep track of versions.  Essentially, Google Apps enables what the Harvard Law School professor Yochai Benkler refers to as “commons-based peer production.”