Tag Archives: Post for MiddPoints

Mobile “Popup” Helpdesk at Bi-Hall

The Helpdesk is coming to McCardell Bicentennial Hall’s “Great Hall”!  We are offering all the services of the Call Center and Walk-in Helpdesk… on your end of campus.   Come by with your laptop, or ask for a staff member or student consultant to swing by your office in MBH to help with a desktop question.
We’ll be there to help from 10:00 AM – Noon on March 30th, April 6th & 27th, and May 11th.   Stop by and see us!
Watch for more dates and locations as we roll out our Mobile “Popup” Helpdesk.

Come Secure your Mobile Device

Learn about Mobile Security

Plan ahead for an afternoon RoadShow with Information Security March 30th @ 2:00 in Lib145.

This is an opportunity for you to ask questions and converse on topics such as:

  • How do I add a pin to my mobile device
  • Is my device encrypted
  • How do I track my device if lost
  • How do I remote wipe my device
  • How do I ensure my data is backed up

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Get help securing your mobile device.

Join Information Security in Lib145 @ 2:00PM on March 30th.

Follow Information Security on Twitter @MiddInfoSec.

@MiddInfoSec: Securing Mobile Devices

Information Security has a new Twitter feed and other new content on their website. Follow us at @MiddInfosec on Twitter or visit our website at http://go.middlebury.edu/infosec

Mobile devices have become one of the primary ways that we communicate and interact with each other. Powerful computers now fit in our pockets and on our wrists, allowing us to bank, shop, view our medical history, work remotely, and communicate from virtually anywhere. With all this convenience comes added risk, so here are some tips to help secure your devices and protect your personal information.

    • Password-protect your devices. Protect the data on your mobile device and enable encryption by enabling passwords, PINs, fingerprint scans, or other forms of authentication. On most current mobile operating systems you have the option to encrypt your data when you have a password turned on. Turn it on!
    • Secure those devices and backup data. Make sure that you can remotely lock and/or wipe each mobile device. That also means you should back up your data on each device in case you need to use the remote wipe function. Services such as iCloud, OneDrive, and Google offer device location, wipe and backup services.
    • Verify app permissions. Don’t forget to review which privacy-related permissions each application is requesting, before installing it. Be cautious of fake applications masquerading as legitimate programs by verifying that the application is from a reputable source, such as the Apple Apps Store, Microsoft’s Store, or Google’s Play Store. Occasionally,  applications in the official stores can include malware. Read reviews and descriptions carefully. Only install applications that you need. Remove applications that you are no longer using.
    • Update operating systems. Security fixes or patches for mobile devices’ operating systems are often included in these updates. Just like patching a computer, iOS, Android, and Windows Mobile all need to be patched and kept current.
    • Be cautious of public Wi-Fi hotspots. When using your mobile device, watch for connections to public hotspots. Many mobile devices will automatically connect to hotspots and prioritize data transmission over Wi-Fi by default. Verify that your settings require manually selecting hotspots if possible. Working with sensitive data while connected to a public hotspot could lead to unintended data exposure. Always ensure that you are using a secure connection.
    • Always apply safe computing practices. Whether traveling with a mobile device, a laptop, or sitting in a hotel business center, you always want to use safe computing practices to protect your data. See this link for more tips: http://www.middlebury.edu/offices/technology/infosec/education/training/SafeComputing.

 

@MiddInfoSec: A New Phishing Attack is Targeting Email ID’s

A new phishing attack is hitting the campus with a subject line of, “Your email id”. Delete this message if you see it. Do NOT click any links in this message. If you believe you have fallen for this fishing attack:

This malicious email would have looked similar to the message below.

————————————

Subject: Your email id

Your?mail Id has used 91% of its allowable storage space.?Once your account exceeds the allowable storage space you will be unable to receive any email.?Click?Resolve?to login to your account and resolve this issue.

?

Support

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For additional information on phishing please visit http://go.middlebury.edu/phish .

 

@MiddInfoSec: Beware of Presidential Election Related Phishing Emails

Every election year we find our senses pounded with propaganda from pundits and candidates trying to sway us to one political camp or another. Computer attackers are leveraging our curiosity, and perhaps desensitization to political messages to launch attacks with purportedly political themes.

Recent phishing attacks that have been reported by security firms such as KnowBe4 include:

  • Trump Withdraws from Presidential Race
  • Sanders Withdraws from Presidential Race
  • Update your voter registration
  • Hillary Clinton Indicted by FBI on Email Scandal

Watch for these and other email phishing attacks. Know how to spot a phish. Learn more at http://go.middlebury.edu/phish.

Poster Printing in the Wilson Media Lab

At a certain point in the semester the digital media tutors and I begin to develop a love/hate relationship with our plotter. Everyone loves the ability to create and print large scale graphic representations of our work but we hate the error messages, ink stripes, and “Plotter is down” signs on the doorway to the lab.

Finals week spring term 2014. Not a pretty day for the plotter.

Finals week spring term 2014. Not a pretty day for the plotter.

Like any piece of mechanical equipment that is heavily used, the plotter will occasionally break. Although we usually have no warning when this is about to happen, there are a few things that everyone can do to help us tame the plotter.

Professors –

  • Send an email to library-at@middlebury.edu to notify us of the timeframe when your students will be working on and printing poster projects. (The earlier – the better! First week of class = PERFECT!) If you can send us a copy of the assignment – even better!
  • Be sure your students know how to use the best tools to create a poster. (A lot of students come to the lab with PowerPoint files that can be challenging to scale correctly. We recommend using Illustrator and provide docs for how to do this too!) Faculty can also request a poster tutorial session for their class by submitting a helpdesk ticket here.  
  • If you are requiring posters for your class and want your department to cover the cost of poster printing follow these instructions early in the semester.

Students –

  • Don’t underestimate the amount of time it takes to create a visual piece of work. It might seem like it will come together faster than a paper, but often there is just one component that you can’t get to look just right, or a feature in Illustrator that is not working the way you expected.
  • Make an appointment with a digital media tutor if you need help with more than a couple of questions. This will allow us to dedicate more time focused on you rather than reloading paper and ink in the plotter and helping everyone else in the lab. (We’ll schedule another tutor to do that.)
  • Fully proof your poster on the screen before sending the file to print on the plotter.

Everyone

Recycle your scraps and remember that advanced planning is often the key to success!

 

@MiddInfoSec: Information Security RoadShow: 2/23/2016

Plan ahead for a lunch and learn RoadShow. On February 23rd, 2016 ITS-Information Security will be hosting a RoadShow conversation on safe computing practices and phishing avoidance techniques in Lib145 from 12:00 to 1:00. This conversation is open to the entire Middlebury community. All are encouraged to come.

Topics include:

  • How to spot a phish
  • Safe download practices and installing applications on your computer
  • Data classification and sensitive data
  • Removable media and when to use it
  • Password management and what to do with all of those passwords

 

Follow ITS-Information Security on Twitter: @MiddInfoSec