Tag Archives: Post for MiddPoints

Welcome to “Self-Service” Software Installation

ITS has been working on options for our customers to install licensed software on their college-owned computers using convenient, “self-service” methods that provide control over when the installations take place. (We are not licensed to provide software on personally owned computers, only college owned.)  To learn how this works on college Windows computers, please visit  KACE Self-Service information.  If you have a college Mac, visit Mac Self Service information for details.

Initially, we have made a few of our most commonly-requested Adobe products available through self-service for both Mac and Windows platforms, as well as the new Microsoft Office 2016.   We will be working to add software titles in the next few months.  Please note that not all software is purchased with licensing to be available for every computer on campus.

Self-service installations work best when you are here on campus using a wired (Ethernet) connection to our network.  Use of VPN or wireless connections may work but they will be much slower and are more likely to experience issues.

We are excited to offer this new service and want to hear about how it worked for you.  Feel free to share your feedback, questions, or concerns with our Technology Helpdesk.

Digital Surrealism as Research Strategy April 5th

Please join us Tuesday, April 5th at 12:15 PM in the CTLR Lounge for a lunchtime discussion with Kevin Ferguson on some playful and interdisciplinary approaches to digital scholarship that use technologies developed in other fields (like the medical imaging software ImageJ) to answer humanistic questions. Lunch will be served, so please RSVP here. He also has some free time during the day on Wednesday, so if you’d like to learn more about ImageJ or chat with him email Alicia Peaker with your availability.

Most digital humanities approaches pursue traditional forms of scholarship by extracting a single variable from cultural texts that is already legible to scholars. Instead, this talk advocates a mostly-ignored “digital-surrealism” that uses computer-based methods to transform film texts in radical ways not previously possible. The return to a surrealist and avant-garde tradition requires a unique kind of research, which is newly possible now that humanists have made the digital turn. I take a surrealist view of the hidden in order to imagine what aspects of media texts are literally impossible to see without special computer-assisted techniques. What in the archive is in plain sight but still invisible? What in the cinema is so buried that our naked eyes are unable to see it? Here I present one such method, using the z-projection function of the scientific image analysis software ImageJ, to sum film frames in order to create new composite images. I examine four corpora of what would normally be considered rather different types of film: (1) the animated features produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios, (2) a representative selection of the western genre (including American and Italian “spaghetti” westerns), (3) a group of gialli (stylish horror films originating from Italy that influenced American slasher films), and (4) the series of popular Japanese Zatoichi films, following the adventures of the titular blind masseuse and swordsman living in 1830s Japan.

Kevin Ferguson is an Assistant Professor of English and Director of Writing at Queens College (CUNY). He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on college writing, contemporary literature, and film adaptation.

@MiddInfoSec: Phishing Alert – – “Update Announcements”

A phishing email message was sent to @middlebury.edu mailboxes today with a subject line of “Update Announcements”.  DO NOT RESPOND ON THIS MESSAGE!

The phishing email message is an attack designed to trick people into disclosing their username and password.  Do NOT follow the instructions in the message, as it could lead to your Middlebury account being compromised.

If you were tricked by the email and responded,  reset your network password immediately at go/password and then call the Helpdesk at x2200 for further assistance with your account and any possible concerns with your computer.

Here’s a sample of the phishing email message:


Dear middlebury.edu User.

Urgent Update Announcements.

Your middlebury.edu Account has been Sign in with a strange IP Address: And this indicate your mail account is been used for FRAUDULENT ACT, For these reasons, Our records indicate you are no longer our current/active user. Therefore, your account has been scheduled for deletion on this Month of APRIL, 2016. As part of this process, your account, files, email address messages etc, will be deleted from our Data Base.

To Retail Your Account.

You are required to reply with your valid ONLINE ACCESS for reactivation, to ensure Your account remains active and subscribed, Otherwise this account will be De-activated within the next 72 hours hence from now.

Name In Full:

User Name:

Pass Word:

@middlebury.edu

Thank You.



 

Mobile “Popup” Helpdesk at Bi-Hall

The Helpdesk is coming to McCardell Bicentennial Hall’s “Great Hall”!  We are offering all the services of the Call Center and Walk-in Helpdesk… on your end of campus.   Come by with your laptop, or ask for a staff member or student consultant to swing by your office in MBH to help with a desktop question.
We’ll be there to help from 10:00 AM – Noon on March 30th, April 6th & 27th, and May 11th.   Stop by and see us!
Watch for more dates and locations as we roll out our Mobile “Popup” Helpdesk.

Come Secure your Mobile Device

Learn about Mobile Security

Plan ahead for an afternoon RoadShow with Information Security March 30th @ 2:00 in Lib145.

This is an opportunity for you to ask questions and converse on topics such as:

  • How do I add a pin to my mobile device
  • Is my device encrypted
  • How do I track my device if lost
  • How do I remote wipe my device
  • How do I ensure my data is backed up

Image 001

Get help securing your mobile device.

Join Information Security in Lib145 @ 2:00PM on March 30th.

Follow Information Security on Twitter @MiddInfoSec.

@MiddInfoSec: Securing Mobile Devices

Information Security has a new Twitter feed and other new content on their website. Follow us at @MiddInfosec on Twitter or visit our website at http://go.middlebury.edu/infosec

Mobile devices have become one of the primary ways that we communicate and interact with each other. Powerful computers now fit in our pockets and on our wrists, allowing us to bank, shop, view our medical history, work remotely, and communicate from virtually anywhere. With all this convenience comes added risk, so here are some tips to help secure your devices and protect your personal information.

    • Password-protect your devices. Protect the data on your mobile device and enable encryption by enabling passwords, PINs, fingerprint scans, or other forms of authentication. On most current mobile operating systems you have the option to encrypt your data when you have a password turned on. Turn it on!
    • Secure those devices and backup data. Make sure that you can remotely lock and/or wipe each mobile device. That also means you should back up your data on each device in case you need to use the remote wipe function. Services such as iCloud, OneDrive, and Google offer device location, wipe and backup services.
    • Verify app permissions. Don’t forget to review which privacy-related permissions each application is requesting, before installing it. Be cautious of fake applications masquerading as legitimate programs by verifying that the application is from a reputable source, such as the Apple Apps Store, Microsoft’s Store, or Google’s Play Store. Occasionally,  applications in the official stores can include malware. Read reviews and descriptions carefully. Only install applications that you need. Remove applications that you are no longer using.
    • Update operating systems. Security fixes or patches for mobile devices’ operating systems are often included in these updates. Just like patching a computer, iOS, Android, and Windows Mobile all need to be patched and kept current.
    • Be cautious of public Wi-Fi hotspots. When using your mobile device, watch for connections to public hotspots. Many mobile devices will automatically connect to hotspots and prioritize data transmission over Wi-Fi by default. Verify that your settings require manually selecting hotspots if possible. Working with sensitive data while connected to a public hotspot could lead to unintended data exposure. Always ensure that you are using a secure connection.
    • Always apply safe computing practices. Whether traveling with a mobile device, a laptop, or sitting in a hotel business center, you always want to use safe computing practices to protect your data. See this link for more tips: http://www.middlebury.edu/offices/technology/infosec/education/training/SafeComputing.

 

@MiddInfoSec: A New Phishing Attack is Targeting Email ID’s

A new phishing attack is hitting the campus with a subject line of, “Your email id”. Delete this message if you see it. Do NOT click any links in this message. If you believe you have fallen for this fishing attack:

This malicious email would have looked similar to the message below.

————————————

Subject: Your email id

Your?mail Id has used 91% of its allowable storage space.?Once your account exceeds the allowable storage space you will be unable to receive any email.?Click?Resolve?to login to your account and resolve this issue.

?

Support

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For additional information on phishing please visit http://go.middlebury.edu/phish .