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Busy start to 2014 in Special Collections

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Special Collections has enjoyed a busy start to 2014 with several J-term classes visiting this week to use our collections for coursework. Prof. Peter Lourie’s class Adventure Writing and Digital Story Telling came to see 17th to early 20th century examples of travel and adventure writing, as well as to view photos from the College Archives of students engaging in their own adventures over the years.

And below see some photos from Prof. Kacy McKinney’s class Space and Place in the Graphic Novel. Students learned about the history of illustrations in books, viewing everything from a 1484 illuminated Latin text, to recently published graphic novels.

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Students looking at a wide selection of illustrated books

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Special Collections Director Rebekah Irwin shares a large format art book.

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Prof. McKinney and students view illustrated books from the 16th to the 18th century.

24/7 exam period at the Libraries

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

The Davis Family Library will be providing extended hours during the last week of classes and the exam period.

24/7 hours will start at 9:00 am on Sunday, 12/2 and will end at 10 pm on Sunday, 12/15. Bring your ID – card access is required between 11 pm and 7:30 am (9 am on Saturday and Sunday). Guest passwords for computer access will not be issued between the hours of 11 pm and 8 am.

Armstrong Library will have regular hours during this period, with later closing times on Friday 12/13 and Saturday 12/14.

Check here for up to date hours at all Libraries.

LIS Fall 2013 Update

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

update

 

The LIS-Update-Fall-2013 from LIS is now available for your reading pleasure.

This update from LIS covers work accomplished this summer and early fall, and projects out into work we will be doing in the later fall and early winter. For those not familiar with this report, it is designed both to capture the contributions that LIS has made in its efforts to support the information and technology needs of the College, and also to ensure that those who work within LIS and those who work closely with LIS are aware of current priorities and initiatives. Because of its goal to provide useful, detailed information for those of us deeply involved in this work, it is a long and somewhat technical document.

For those who may not have the interest or patience to work their way through the over twenty pages within this report, here are some highlights:

  • We’ve recently revised our strategic directions for LIS, and defined a set of overlapping issues that will help us in our efforts to evolve to meet the evolving needs of the College, and the fast-moving world of technology and information services. We are looking at how we support innovation, new models for access to resources, our approach to sourcing various core technologies, how we can support efforts to improve administrative efficiency, and ways to define quality and reliability in the face of growing demand on our resources. You can learn more about this at http://www.middlebury.edu/offices/technology/lis/about/strategic_directions_and_goals

  • We have been working closely with our colleagues at MIIS and with the new DC office to establish a new videconferencing system that significantly improves the quality and reliability of this service.

  • We’ve installed a new system called web help desk that provides our users with the ability to create and track their own tickets, makes the assignment of tickets to workgroups far more efficient, and provides easy access to solutions to common problems.

  • We migrated the last reports from our AS400 data system (the system that Banner replaced) and shut down that system forever.

  • In response to the growth in demand for ubiquitous and robust wireless services across campus, we added access points to locations on campus where there was not adequate service.

  • This fall we have been engaged in a planning effort with our colleagues from the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Research to establish new ways that we can work together to support faculty development in curricular technology, and to develop a plan for work in the digital liberal arts.

This list is just a sample of our many recently completed projects, and our current priorities. I invite you to read through the complete list. If you have any questions about any of this, feel free to contact me.

– mike

PS The graphic is from the Google Books Ngram Viewer, and shows the history of the use of the word Update over the last 500 years.

 

Are you interested in learning more about infographics?

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Lynda.com offers a collection of resources about creating infographics that can be found at this link: http://www.lynda.com/Infographics-training-tutorials/1462-0.html (after you log in using your Middlebury credentials). Not sure what an infographic is? Check out this example on the history of audio equipment via fastcodesign.com where the creators offer a mini-window into the work it took to pull it all together.

The Wilson Media Lab in the Library offers many multimedia tools that can be used to build infographics. Digital Media Tutors are available Sunday – Thursday from 1 pm – 1 am and on Fridays from 1 pm – 7 pm to assist users interested in using these tools.

 

 

Gartner Technology Research Access for Middlebury

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

The Middlebury campus community can find out what’s happening with global IT trends with access to research, news analysis and trends from Gartner Inc.

Gartner, Inc. (NYSE: IT) is the world’s leading information technology research and advisory company. Middlebury has a campus subscription to Gartner’s online research database. To access Gartner, simply visit http://go.middlebury.edu/gartner-login and authenticate using your Middlebury username and password.

Students can benefit by using Gartner to find research for assignments, learn where IT is headed and how it will shape our world, discover an area of interest, or even get ideas on careers. Gartner research enriches the educational experience by providing timely, objective real-world examples and content.

Faculty & Staff can benefit by using Gartner to stay current on IT industry trends. Gartner provides insight to the application of technology to real-world problems and enables understanding of the long-term trends and issues that current and future IT decision makers will face.

Should you have any problems accessing this resource or have any questions pertaining to Gartner research, please contact Chris Norris.

Follow-Me Printing Update: Easier-to-Remember Print Queue Name

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Woman-PrinterFans of Follow-Me Printing will be happy to know we have changed the print queue name, making it easier to remember.  When submitting your print job, look for FollowMeBW which has replaced Virtual BlackandWhite, effective 10/4/13.

Students, if you haven’t yet tried “Follow-Me” you’re making your printing life more difficult than it needs to be.  Visit go/followme to learn more or check out our earlier blog post.  This time saver allows you to print to a single print queue, then go to any participating print release station to release your print job(s).

Remember…  for fastest results, use Follow-Me Printing on a lab computer.

Using GO (2013)

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

What is GO?

GO is an aliasing and redirection application. Don’t let the jargon intimidate you, just think of it as a way to make and use shortcuts to College resources. If you’d like to visit a GO shortcut when you’re connected by VPN or on campus, simply type it into your address bar in your web browser. For instance type “go/lisblog” and hit “enter” to get to the LIS blog. If you’d like to see a list of shortcuts that are currently available type “go” and hit “enter” to visit the “Gotionary”. Go is also available as a text box at m.middlebury.edu for mobile devices, or as an optional panel on your portal page.

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Tip: When off campus add “go.middlebury.edu” to any GO shortcut in lieu of “go”.

Browser Quirks

If you’re using Chrome or Safari you may find a search is triggered instead of a redirect. There are multiple ways to circumvent the integrated search feature when using GO.

Safari

  • Add a slash at the end of your GO link. Example: go/lisblog/
  • Alternatively, put “http://” in front of your GO request. Example: http://go/lisblog
  • If you prefer to select from options, look for the “Go to Site” option in the drop-down that appears below the address bar.

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Chrome

Chrome will permanently disable the search behavior for any request starting with “go/” if you follow these steps:

  • Type a code in and hit “enter”. A search results page will appear.
  • Below the address bar it should say “Did you mean to go to http://go/…” Click on that to follow the link to the go/shortcut. After that Chrome should automatically resolve any go shortcuts.

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GO Shortcuts as Permalinks

You can use a GO shortcut as a link URL for any page internal to middlebury.edu. Example: <a href='http://go.middlebury.edu/lisblog'>LIS Blog</a>. You’ll want to use a GO shortcut rather than a direct link for any resources you are linking to that could change location. As long as the shortcut admin updates the shortcut when a content location changes you won’t need to update any of your links.

Tip: Don’t forget to use the full url “go.middlebury.edu” so that users from off-campus will be able to use the link.

GO eased the launch of the new site by allowing links in content to be easily updated en-mass. GO has also become central to our search strategy as GO shortcuts are provided as suggestions and automatic-redirects when you enter search terms on the main site.

For additional information see: http://mediawiki.middlebury.edu/wiki/LIS/GO