Tag Archives: Post for MiddNotes

Protect Your Privacy

Information Security has a New Twitter feed and other new content on their website. Follow us at #MiddInfosec or visit our website at http://go.middlebury.edu/infosec

You and your information are everywhere. When you’re online you leave a trail of “digital exhaust” in the form of cookies, GPS data, social network posts, and e-mail exchanges, among others. It is critical to learn how to protect yourself and guard your privacy. Your identity and even your bank account could be at risk!

  • Use long and complex passwords or passphrases. These are often the first line of defense in protecting an online account. The length and complexity of your passwords can provide an extra level of protection for your personal information.
  • Take care what you share. Periodically check the privacy settings for your social networking apps to ensure that they are set to share only what you want, with whom you intend. Be very careful about putting personal information online. What goes on the Internet¬¬ usually stays on the Internet.
  • Go stealth when browsing. Your browser can store quite a bit of information about your online activities, including cookies, cached pages, and history. To ensure the privacy of personal information online, limit access by going “incognito” and using the browser’s private mode.
  • Using Wi-Fi? If only public Wi-Fi is available, restrict your activity to simple searches (no banking!) or use a VPN (virtual private network). The latter provides an encrypted tunnel between you and the sites you visit.
  • Should you trust that app? Only use apps from reputable sources. Check out reviews from users or other trusted sources before downloading anything that is unfamiliar.

Protect Your Privacy

Information Security has a New Twitter feed and other new content on their website. Follow us at #MiddInfosec or visit our website at http://go.middlebury.edu/infosec

You and your information are everywhere. When you’re online you leave a trail of “digital exhaust” in the form of cookies, GPS data, social network posts, and e-mail exchanges, among others. It is critical to learn how to protect yourself and guard your privacy. Your identity and even your bank account could be at risk!

  • Use long and complex passwords or passphrases. These are often the first line of defense in protecting an online account. The length and complexity of your passwords can provide an extra level of protection for your personal information.
  • Take care what you share. Periodically check the privacy settings for your social networking apps to ensure that they are set to share only what you want, with whom you intend. Be very careful about putting personal information online. What goes on the Internet¬¬ usually stays on the Internet.
  • Go stealth when browsing. Your browser can store quite a bit of information about your online activities, including cookies, cached pages, and history. To ensure the privacy of personal information online, limit access by going “incognito” and using the browser’s private mode.
  • Using Wi-Fi? If only public Wi-Fi is available, restrict your activity to simple searches (no banking!) or use a VPN (virtual private network). The latter provides an encrypted tunnel between you and the sites you visit.
  • Should you trust that app? Only use apps from reputable sources. Check out reviews from users or other trusted sources before downloading anything that is unfamiliar.

Friday Links — December 18, 2016

Virtual Reality

Image: Shawn Whiting, Erin Carson/TechRepublic

Virtual reality in 2016: The 10 biggest trends to watch – one point of view on what to expect, and what not to expect, in virtual reality in the coming year.

The 10 most important lessons IT learned in 2015 – Before moving on to the new year it is a good idea to reflect back on lessons learned during the previous 12 months. It is also a good idea to compare our experience to that of others.

Digital Media Bootcamp Update

We have added another workshop to the Digital Media Bootcamp series in January.
Wilson Media Lab

Wilson Media Lab

Zotero for Everyone: Organize Your Research @ 4:30pm in LIB 201

Date: January 14, 2016

Are you drowning in journal articles and books, but not sure how to keep track of it all? Are you working on a senior project or need help managing your resources? Let us help you on the next stage of your journey as a power researcher. After this workshop, you’ll be an expert in Zotero, the citation management tool that can help you save, organize, and cite your sources, and you’ll be able to create bibliographies with the click of a button. This workshop will be taught by Middlebury research librarian Stacy Reardon. PLEASE NOTE THE ALTERNATE ROOM.

Current list of Workshops

Title Date
Intro to Visual Literacy and Presentations @ 2:45pm 4-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Intro to Audio Literacy @ 2:45pm 5-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Quicktime, SnapZ Pro, MPEG Streamclip @ 2:45pm 6-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Presentation Kick-starter @ 1pm 7-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Equipment Demo: Scanners, Plotters and more @ 1pm 8-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Copyright, IP and Creative Commons @ 1pm 11-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Audio Software @ 2:45pm 11-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Adobe InDesign @ 1pm 12-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Adobe Illustrator @ 2:45pm 12-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Equipment Demo: Cameras @ 1pm 13-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Adobe Photoshop @ 2:45pm 13-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Equipment Demo: Space and Place (Oculus Rift, Leap Motion, etc.) @ 1pm 14-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Zotero for Everyone: Organize Your Research @ 4:30pm in LIB 201 14-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Working with Data @1pm until 4pm 19-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Visualizing Data @1pm until 4pm 20-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Mapping Data @1pm until 4pm 21-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Analyzing Textual Data @1pm until 4pm 22-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Introduction to Information Literacy @ 2:45pm 25-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Safe Computing Practices at Middlebury @ 1pm 25-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Online Identity: Your Story to the World @ 2:45pm 26-Jan-16 View & sign-up »
Online Recording Lab: SANSSpace @ 1pm 27-Jan-16 View & sign-up »

 

Exam Hours at the Libraries

The Davis Family Library will offer extended hours starting Sunday, December 6th. We will open at 9 am that day and be open 24 hours through Friday, December 11th, when we will close at the regular 11 pm. Saturday, December 12th will be regular hours, 9 am – 11 pm. 24/7 will resume on Sunday starting at 9 am and the library will close at 10 pm on Sunday, December 20th. A Middlebury College ID will be required to enter the library after 11 pm during this period.

Armstrong Library will maintain regular hours, with extended hours on Friday and Saturday, December 18th and 19th.

Full hours can be found at go/hours.

Digital Media Bootcamp Update

We have added four more workshop to the Digital Media Bootcamp series in January, including three sessions for the Digital Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp.

Wilson Media Lab

Wilson Media Lab

Title Date
Presentation Kick-starter @ 1pm January 7, 2016

You are in a group of people that have been given the task of giving a presentation on a topic, now what do you do? This workshop will walk you through some rapid prototyping and iterative feedback steps to create a draft of your presentation.

Digital Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp

Title Date
Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Visualizing Data @1pm until 4pm January 20, 2016
Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Mapping Data @1pm until 4pm January 21, 2016
Liberal Arts Data Bootcamp – Analyzing Textual Data @1pm until 4pm January 22, 2016
  • Title: Visualizing Data
  • Instructors: Ryan Clement & Alicia Peaker
  • Prerequisite: Working with Data

Description: In this session, we’ll cover some of the basic theory of visual communication, including how to choose the best visual representation for your data, and best practices for preparing visualizations for print, the web, or presenting. We’ll discuss traditional representations, including bar, line, and scatterplots, as well as touching on more advanced representations. After a discussion of how visualizations are used (and advanced) in humanistic research, we’ll use freely available web-based tools to create our own visualizations.

  • Title: Mapping Data
  • Instructors: Ryan Clement & Alicia Peaker
  • Prerequisite: Working with Data

Description: In this session, we’ll work through how to prepare, use, and present spatial data. We’ll start with an overview of spatial literacy topics, including how to select a projection (and why it’s important), working with map layers, and basic cartographic theory. We’ll then explore some library resources for creating maps and obtaining spatial data, and then create our own maps using free, web-based tools.

  • Title: Analyzing Textual Data
  • Instructor: Alicia Peaker
  • Prerequisite: Working with Data

Description: In this session, we’ll work through how to prepare, use, and analyze textual data (e.g. novels, newspapers, journals, plays, survey responses, etc.) to address humanistic research questions. While quantitative approaches may be appropriate for some research questions, this session will primarily focus on text mining as an exploratory practice that leads to or helps refine analysis.

We also have a number of seats still available in the following workshops that cover a range of topics, including browser-based video recording services, how the world perceives us on the internet, and opportunities to use equipment like the Leap Motion and Oculus Rift. Visit the DMBootcamp web site for more information.