Tag Archives: Networking

Social Impact Events with Alumni: Learn More About Impact Sectors

Big things happening here on campus this coming week in the world of social impact and development. Here are Tracy’s top 5 reasons you should try to attend any one of these events with our Middlebury alumni who have come back to campus:

1) Knowledge is power, and the more you are armed with info about certain sectors, the more easily it is to identify with why or why not this space is a place you want to spend your time and learn more from;

2) Internships are a great way to gain experience in a sector that you are curious about, whether its a nonprofit or a research think tank or social entrepreneurship, alumni here on campus are here to help you explore these possibilities;

3) Learn Who the Players Are: engaging with alumni who have experience in different sectors of the social impact space can help you understand ‘who the players are’ in the different sectors–are they NGOs (non-governmental organizations), consultants, funders, foundations, think tanks, or corporations;

4) Networking: at Middlebury we are so fortunate to have alumni that stay connected to their alma mater in ways that are incredibly meaningful, from mentoring current students during summer internships to helping seniors prepare for the job application and interview process. These alumni are willing to assist current students to connect with other like-minded professionals in their industries and sectors. So come meet them, ask well-prepared questions and think about ways that you can connect with their networks;

5) JOBS…there are so many ways that alumni ‘give back’ to Middlebury and one is by working with CCI to post jobs on Handshake. Don’t be surprised then, when you find entry-level J-PAL jobs listed in Handshake!

***EVENTS NOT TO BE MISSED THIS WEEK ***

  • Tuesday, October 31, 2017, 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm, CCI Library, ADK House – Alumni Career Conversation w/former CEO of Save the Children, Charlie MacCormack ’63: How to Enter Global Development

https://middlebury.joinhandshake.com/events/87145/share_preview

  • Tuesday, October 31, 2017, 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm, CCI Library, ADK House – Careers at the Abdul Latin Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) at MIT: Hannah Myers, Middlebury ’14, will present on J-PAL’s work, randomized evaluations, and how to get a job with J-PAL or J-PAL’s partners.

https://middlebury.joinhandshake.com/events/97868/share_preview

  • Friday, November 3, 2017, 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm, Coltrane Lounge, ADK House – How to Have a Purposeful Job Search: Carolyn Birsky ’10.5 offers students a different way of approaching the job search process and avoid the trap of taking any job they can get their hands on.

https://middlebury.joinhandshake.com/events/73891/share_preview

Emails do matter!

Whether you are currently applying to jobs and internships, or will be in the next couple months, you are sure to be sending out a lot of emails. After all the work you’ll put into crafting strong resumes and letters, you want to be sure that your emails reflect this same professionalism. Emails do matter!

An email is one of your first impressions to a potential employer. It is your opportunity to show off your professionalism, your maturity, and your serious interest in the position. Emails give the employer some small insight into what it’s like to interact with you as a person. While proper email etiquette is not going to get you the job, improper etiquette will turnoff the employer and hurt your job chances.

When responding to employer emails, the old dating rule “wait three days” does not apply. You’re not trying to play it “cool” and avoid coming off as “desperate.” Slow responses signal to employers that you’re not that interested. They might not waste time waiting for your response when they have a pool of other qualified candidates. In addition, waiting for your answer might irritate an interviewer. Therefore, it’s good practice to respond to emails within 24 hours. Responding and saying that you were “really busy”, is not an excuse. The potential employer is busy too, and this excuse may make them question your ability to handle the workload at their company along with various responsibilities of the job. Use your quick response time to indicate to the employer that you consider this job a top priority.

When job and internship searching over email, using professional etiquette may encourage the potential employer to take you seriously and actually read the email. Use a professional email, not your soccerchick@hotmail.com account.  Address the individual by their appropriate title (Ms., Mr., Dr., etc), write a clear subject line, and use proper grammar. Be positive, polite, and concise, but be sure to include the relevant information. If it has not already been stated that the employer would like a cover letter and resume, ask for permission to include the documents with the email. Attach your cover letter and resume, each as their own PDF, and clearly labeled with your last name (Smith_Resume). Do not paste your cover letter into the body of the email. Last, absolutely NO emoticons, no matter how perfectly the “high-five” captures your feelings about the job.

Here’s an example of what your email should NOT look like:

Here’s an example of what it should look like:

Lastly, re-read your email before you send it!
For more information on how to write emails, check out this helpful article in the balance.

Caroline  Jaschke ’18 is a Peer Career Advisor at the CCI and a double majoring in English and Neuroscience. In her role, she helps students develop resumes and cover letters, prepare for interviews, and access helpful job and internship search resources such as Handshake.

 

Sushi & Social Change: Work on Purpose – FFW Sat., Oct 14 @ 11am in Coltrane

DURING FALL FAMILY WEEKEND THIS SATURDAY @ 11:00AM: Bring your parents, bring your roommate(s), bring your friends. Join the CCI for some delicious sushi and lots of incredible conversations about bringing purpose and passion to the life you want to live!

Women in Corporate and Nonprofit Leadership Seminar-Deadlines Extended!

STUDENTS – Note deadline extended! You now have until Friday September 29 to apply for a PLEN scholarship (Preparing. Learn more about how to apply and submit your application at plen.org/scholarships.

We’ve just extended the deadlines for our Women in Corporate and Nonprofit Leadership seminar!

EXTENDED DEADLINES:
Women in Corporate and Nonprofit Leadership – November 2-4, 2017
Scholarship deadline – September 29, 2017
Registration deadline – October 6, 2017

Experience the policy making process from women who lead business and nonprofits in Washington, DC at the Women in Corporate and Nonprofit Leadership seminar November 2-4, 2017. Learn about the most pressing policy issues facing businesses and nonprofits, develop valuable skills like salary negotiation and advocacy, and meet with top lobbyists, CEOs, and nonprofit leaders in Washington, DC, all while connecting with peers from across the country. Apply for a scholarship by Friday September 29, and register for the seminar by Friday October 6. Learn more at plen.org/wcnl.

PLEN seminars give students the chance to discuss current policy issues, visit institutions and organizations in DC, and launch their careers through intimate coaching sessions on networking, resume writing, and salary negotiation. During all seminars, students network with distinguished women at the top of their fields while building connections with their peers from across the country.

PLEN Background for the curious:

The Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN) is the only national organization with the sole focus of preparing college women for leadership in the public policy arena. PLEN is a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization based in Washington, D.C.

PLEN’s mission is to increase the number of women in top leadership positions influencing all aspects of the public policy process.

There are also other seminars too:

 

Wondering what to do with a Geography major?

If you are already a geography major or thinking about declaring, come join a conversation with six (6) Middlebury alumni who are  coming to campus to talk to you about how they used their Geography major in pursuit of their current careers.  This “Field Guide for Geography Majors” on Thursday-Friday, September 28-29 is an opportunity for you to ask questions and hear about how their experiences both on and off campus have helped them elevate their skills towards purposeful work and meaningful decisions along their trajectories.

What did they do at Middlebury and what are they doing now? Find out at these events: go/fieldguide or http://www.middlebury.edu/student-life/creativity-innovation-exploration/engagement-careers/careers-and-internships/events/field-guide/geography. You can RSVP on Handshake for the Thursday, September 28, 2017 Alumni Panel @ 5:00 p.m. and the Alumni Networking Dinner@ 6:15 p.m. (both at Atwater Dining Hall), and you can also sign up for 1:1 appointments with the alumni on Friday morning September 29. The event site has the alumni bios–a diverse array of speakers with interesting backgrounds.

Are you in DC this summer? Register for 2 professional development workshops to help you succeed in govt work!

Your Path to Public Service and Beyond

Take advantage of these two offerings hosted by the Partnership for Public Service and George Washington University Graduate School of Political Management.  You can register for one or both sessions on July 28 and August 4.

The workshop series teaches you vital skills needed to get the most out of their current internship and prepares you for a successful career in government.

The two-part workshop series is designed for students interested in legislative affairs, communications, public affairs or related fields.

WORKSHOP DETAILS:

Your Personal Brand and Mission
July 28, 5-7 p.m., at the Partnership for Public Service

Identify your values and understand how they align with broader agency mission.  Get effective tips on how to build your personal leadership brand

Panelists:

Ashwani Jain, Associate Director of External Affairs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Carmen Hills, Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Department of State
Susanna B. Marking, Acting Chief of Public Affairs, Federal Protective Service, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Register here to attend.

 

Building Your Network
August 4, 5-7 p.m., at George Washington University campus

Learn tips for effective networking
Identify key skills and how to apply them to future career opportunities
Put your skills to practice at the networking reception following the workshop

Register here to attend.