Tag Archives: MiddPoints

Attention VPN (Pulse Secure) Users!

On January 31, 2019, Information Technology Services (ITS) will enable a feature on the Virtual Private Network (VPN) system that will detect if your VPN software needs to be upgraded to the latest release. If an upgrade is indicated, you will see a popup window from the Pulse Secure VPN application informing you that “An upgrade is available for Pulse Secure.” Please click on “Upgrade” to complete the upgrade process. Keeping the client up to date will ensure that all security updates have been applied.

Users of the older Juniper VPN client should note that the system tray icon has changed. The Pulse Secure client icon now looks like a fancy letter “S.”

Linux Users: The automatic upgrade isn’t offered for Linux; the new client can be downloaded manually from https://middfiles.middlebury.edu/software/public/VPN/

If you have concerns or issues with this upgrade please contact the Help Desk at http://go.middlebury.edu/helpme/, helpdesk@middlebury.edu, or 802-443-2200.

Update on New York Times access

You may be aware that we’ve had an access problem with the New York Times web site over the past few months. The short version of the issue is that SGA was providing online access until NYT discontinued that program…which no one on campus realized until our access ceased (there’s more detail in this Campus article). The Times’ new program is extremely expensive, and the library’s funding for this fiscal year was set last year. Partial access is still available; would that full access were, and we wish an immediate solution were at hand. We haven’t given up, though, and are still working on the problem. Please feel free to contact Douglas Black, Head of Collections Management, for more information.

Faculty: Are you grading research papers…

…and hoping they’ll be a little better next time? Talk with a librarian! We’d love to help you build more research and information literacy support into your spring semester classes. Our new InfoLit site describes what we do, and how it makes a difference. You’ll find assignment ideas, sample workshops, and of course, lots more prompts to talk with a librarian.

InfoLit site

“Every student who met with you commented on how that meeting focused their work and led them to search the appropriate literature quickly and effectively.”
-Faculty feedback on library research consultations for students, Fall 2018

 

Interlibrary Loan Winter Break Service Update – 2018

Books

Due to the holidays, shipping madness, the increased risk of losses, and the lack of open libraries willing to send things, the Interlibrary Loan Department limits ordering and shipping during the second half of December.

If you need anything before winter break request it now!  Interlibrary loan requests submitted to ILLiad after Dec. 15th will be ordered in early January.

ILLiad article requests will continue to be filled by RapidILL through Dec. 22st, but requests must have a valid ISSN and year to be processed by Rapid.

Use Worldcat to find your citations and submit your loan requests!

 

Classroom Upgrades Fall `18 & Spring `19

Throughout the year Media Services is always working on improving the classrooms around campus.  This ongoing process involves removing old technology and introducing new technology.

For the 2018 – 2019 academic year, new laser projectors that don’t require bulb changes or maintenance have been installed. Media Services will be  eliminating VGA cables and installing AppleTV for AirPlay (wireless projection) from any Apple device.  Go to go/airplay for instructions on how this works.  The updated classroom instructions will also include instructions on how to operate AppleTV.

HDMI cables and Blu-ray players will remain.

If you have questions about the classroom upgrades, please reach out to Media Services.

The following classrooms will receive upgrades:

Fall Semester 

CHT 107

CHT 109

FIC Fr 1

FIC Ck1

MBH 303

MBH 311

MBH 317

MBH 403

MBH 411

MBH 417

MBH 430

MBH 530

 

   Fall Semester  

AXN 100

AXN 103

AXN 104

AXN 109

AXN 219

AXN 220

AXN 229

LAFORCE 121

PEARSON MAX KADE

ROSS B11

SDL 110

 

 

 

 

You can now receive library circulation notices via text message

The library now offers patrons the option of receiving circulation notices via text message. If you choose to opt in, you will get overdue, hold pickup, and courtesy notices on your phone, in addition to via email. To opt in, login to My MIDCAT at go/renew, click the “Modify Personal Info” button, enter your mobile phone number, check the “Opt in” box, read the conditions, and click “Submit”. Opt out at any time by following the same procedure and unchecking the “Opt in” button. Contact library_circulation@middlebury.edu with any questions.

Exhibit of early printed books opening June 14th in the library

Special Collections’ summer exhibition, In the Footprints of the First German Printers: 1450-1500, retraces the expansion of printing in Europe. The exhibit follows the German pioneers who initiated and spread the historical evolution of the art of bookprinting and developed a tradition that transformed the world of learning.

All but one of the books featured were donated by Helen and Arthur Tashiera, Californian benefactors of Middlebury who summered in Vermont. In 1946, they generously gifted forty-three printed books from the infancy of print, primarily from Italy and Germany. (The other book on display was a gift of Middlebury alumna Ruth Hesselgrave, class of 1918.)

Woodcut print from the Nuremberg Chronicle depicting the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, Lot’s wife turning into a pillar of salt. The Nuremberg Chronicle was produced in 1493, a lavishly illustrated retelling of the history of the world. Middlebury’s copy is in German and was donated by Ruth Hesselgrave, class of 1918.

Each book contains the history of the early evolution of printing. By studying the materials of the covers, pages, inks, the page layout implemented, the hand-painted additions to the printed text, we learn about how the first printers’ processes developed and how readers’ interpretation of texts evolved. (And that’s without even reading them!) 

In the Footprints of the First German Printers: 1450-1500 was curated by Marie Théberge (P ’10) and designed by Mikaela Taylor (’15) with additional support by Danielle Rougeau and Rebekah Irwin. It will be on display in Davis Family Library atrium (main level) and Harman Periodicals Reading Area (lower level) from June 14th through September 30th.