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Course Sites and New Services

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Last year we posted some course site suggestions for faculty. The information is still relevant, and here is a short summary for those who only need a reminder:

  • Where to find help for faculty - http://go.middlebury.edu/liaisons
  • Where to find help for students working on media assignments - http://go.middlebury.edu/dmt
  • Start at the Course Hub – http://courses.middlebury.edu
    • Add your syllabus as a web page, document, or link
    • In general, if you would like your course site to be private choose Moodle
    • In general, if you would like your course site to be public choose WordPress
    • If you make your course unavailable to students while you are building it, please make sure you make it available before students need access to it.

There are a handful of new services that are available for faculty to use in their courses:

SANSSpace

SANSSpace has a web-based video and audio recorder for class assignments. Students can record audio or video and save directly to the site, and faculty can respond by inserting text, audio or video in the timeline of the student’s submission. It is most commonly used for an online language lab environment, and also has applications for presentations, music, and writing. SANSSpace can be added to your course via the Course Hub.

Shared Moodle Resource

Currently, the only shared Moodle resource is the Academic Integrity Tutorial. This tutorial can be added to any course via the Course Hub.

Curricular Innovations

There have been many stories about curricular activities gathered over the years, and they have been shared across many sites. We have started to gather them in one place, the Curricular Innovations site, where faculty can see and share experiences in the classroom.

 

Personal tech tip: A colleague recently shared that they use a program called Eyeleo (http://eyeleo.com/) to help them to remember to take regular breaks when spending long amounts of time at a computer. Eyeleo works on windows computers, and there is a similar program, Time Out (http://www.dejal.com/timeout/), that works on Macs.

The Week’s Headlines

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Here are the week’s headlines from the News Room:

Middlebury’s Mahaney Center for the Arts Announces 2014-2015 Season

Students Lend Expertise to Help Preserve a Piece of Town History

New Book Gives Voice to Tolstoy’s Wife

Middlebury Launches New Athletics Website

Journalist Freed from Qaeda Affiliate is Middlebury Alumnus

View past stories by visiting the News Room page.

New stuff for the New Year! Recently added to the Libraries’ collections

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

The libraries have purchased or subscribed to a bunch of new and wonderful resources over the summer (and late last academic year). Here are some of the highlights:

And these resources will be available very soon!

  • Oxford Language Dictionaries Online (on order)
  • Digitalia Film Library (on order)
  • Chinese Cultural Relics – English translation of Wen Wu (we’ve subscribed and are awaiting publication of the first issue)

Trials expected during Fall Term:

  • Journal of Visual Experiments (JoVE) – streaming video science experiments
  • National Anti-Slavery Standard – primary source material
  • Alexander Street’s Criterion Collection – streaming video of classic movies

We are always adding new resources – make your wishes known here!

The Week’s Headlines

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Here are the week’s headlines from the News Room:

College Establishes Endowed Professorship Honoring Frank Winkler

Middlebury Awards Master’s and Doctoral Degrees in Languages

View past stories by visiting the News Room page.

New Sculpture Being Installed Near Atwater Commons

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

On Tuesday, August 19 work began near Coffrin Hall and Le Chateau for the installation of the latest addition to Middlebury’s collection of outdoor public art. The site is being graded and prepared for the arrival of Youbie Obie, a large work in cor-ten steel by alumni artist J. Pindyck Miller ’60. The work will be craned into place this coming Wednesday, August 27, and the project will be completed during the following week with the addition of landscaping and information placards. For more information about the artwork and to follow the installation process as it progresses, please read the latest post on the Museum blog.

Peter Nelson receives NSF funding for international collaboration

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Peter Nelson (Geography) and a colleague at Point Park University have received a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation for a project titled International Rural Gentrification; research teams from the United Kingdom and France are also funded through their own respective national funding agencies. The entire project is part of the Open Research Area funding scheme for international social science research that now involves agencies in four European countries as well as the NSF. The objective of this multi-national collaborative project is to undertake the first in-depth cross-national integrated comparative study of the theory, forms, and dynamics of rural gentrification encompassing France, the UK, and the USA. The US team will compile a comprehensive database of rural gentrification indicators for each of the three countries and then identify a set of communities in the US in which to carry out in-depth case study analysis focusing on the different forms of rural gentrification and the various actors involved in the process. Scholars from the UK and France will do similar case study analyses in their respective countries. In addition to funding all the costs of the research in the US, the grant will also fund trips to Europe to meet with the entire research team; this research will be the focus of Pete’s academic leave in 2015-16. Three undergraduate students will be involved in this research.

Catherine Combelles awarded an NIH R15 research grant

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Catherine Combelles (Biology) has been awarded an R15 research grant through the National Institutes of Health’s AREA (Academic Research Enhancement Award) program. This grant will support work to determine the effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds on the oocyte and the ovarian follicle, the structure that nurtures the developing oocyte. Because the health of adults, neonates, fetuses, and embryos all depend upon normal oocyte development, the findings will help to provide a foundation for improving not only female reproductive but also adult health. The grant funds research at Middlebury, the University of New Hampshire, and Emory University, including supplies and travel to conferences as well as Catherine’s 15-16 academic leave. At least 15 undergraduates will be involved in this research over the next three years.