Tag Archives: Math

Information Technology – STANDOUT – Emerging Leaders Camp

Procter & Gamble invites SOPHOMORES to experience how P&G transforms the way business is done through technology and innovation every single day by participating in their STANDOUT – Emerging Leaders Camp. Emerging Leaders Camp is a once in a lifetime WOW experience for top candidates!

Join P&G for an all-expense paid 3 day trip to their global headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio to see what P&G stands for and why it is the place for you!

Meet their leaders, learn about their brands, the amazing careers they nurture and grow, and the millions of lives you can impact along the way.

You will be with 200 of the best top candidates from around the country.

You will have a BLAST and a chance to walk away with an internship with P&G for the summer of 2020!! They will be holding on site interviews for an internship for 2020. Emerging Leader Camp will be August 6-9, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Learn more in Handshake.

Pi (π) Day 2019

March 14th marks the 32nd annual π Day! It is a day to celebrate this never-ending number (3.14159 . . .)

According to the folks at careeronestop.com, the list below includes 25 of the careers that have the strongest demand for math skills. “Bright outlook” indicates that the field is expected to either grow rapidly in the next several years, have large numbers of job openings, or both:

Opportunities at Tesla

At Tesla, they’re solving the world’s most important problems with talented individuals who share their passion to change the world. Their culture is fast-paced, energetic and innovative. Headquartered in the San Francisco Bay Area with office locations around the world, they work to build an inclusive environment in which everyone, regardless of gender, race, religion, age, or background, can do their best work.

They have a number of opportunities listed in Handshake. Below are a few we thought our STEM students would be interested in:

Biomechanics Team Research Assistant at ORISE Department of Defense

Applications are now being accepted for a research assistant in biomechanics at the U.S. Army Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM), located in Natick, MA, USA. The mission of USARIEM is to optimize Warfighter health and performance through medical research (www.usariem.army.mil).

As military readiness is a top priority, the ideal candidate will assist in conducting research on the biomechanics of overuse injury risk with a focus on the lower extremities.

This individual will participate in research activities ranging from study conception to data collection and analysis to manuscript publication.

Appointments will be awarded for 1 year, potentially renewable up to 4 years, and will be offered through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

Current research protocols include exploring associations of human movement (walking, load carriage and running), performance and musculoskeletal injury risk utilizing standard motion capture techniques and inertial measurement units (IMUs). The individual will assist with additional activities necessary to enable data collection including IRB paperwork, subject scheduling and coordinating study team member schedules for data collections. The individual will process and analyze motion capture and IMU data plus write-up and present results in abstracts and at conferences.

Learn more in Handshake. Application deadline 2/28.

Open Positions at Facebook for CS and Math Majors!

Facebook’s mission is to give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together. Through their family of apps and services, they’re building a different kind of company that connects billions of people around the world, gives them ways to share what matters most to them, and helps bring people closer together. Whether they’re creating new products or helping a small business expand its reach, people at Facebook are builders at heart. Their global teams are constantly iterating, solving problems, and working together to empower people around the world to build community and connect in meaningful ways.

Do YOU want to build new features and improve existing products that more than a Billion people around the world use?

Are you interested in working on highly impactful technical challenges to help the world be more open and connected?

Want to solve unique, large-scale, highly complex technical problems?

Then consider these position now open in Handshake! Click the position titles to view full description.

How Will You Find Your Next Internship or Job? Networking, Probably.

Your Professional Network Is Bigger Than You Think – Here are the CCI’s Networking Tips!

Networking: What Is It?

Simply put, it’s reaching out to people with whom you share a connection to learn new information. Sometimes that’s about internships and jobs, majors and careers, but sometimes it’s about where to find an apartment in a new city—or a great restaurant, or a place to get your hair cut. We are all “networking” all the time!

Your share a connection to Middlebury with 7,500+ alumni career volunteers. They want to hear from you about your career aspirations and challenges. They also want to know what’s happening on campus: you’ve got something to offer them as well. Below are some tips to help you make the most out of these valuable exchanges.

Networking Shortcuts

Check out the 5-Minute Career Clips (online workshops) for a brief step-by-step guide to conducting a networking conversation.

Check out these examples of how to write an e-mail introducing yourself to a Middlebury Alumni volunteer.

But first, make it count!

Before you make that contact or attend a networking event, be sure
that you are practiced and confident in your networking skills.

Know yourself: your competencies and relevant skills. Know what you want to learn about: which industry or career area interests you.

Why Network? Three Compelling Reasons

1. Most job opportunities (70 percent) are uncovered through networking: More jobs are found this way than through the “want ads,” or company websites, or even through online job-listing sites. Although you’ll want to use all of these channels in your job search, your time is best invested in networking and developing personal connections through your growing network.

2. Most job hunters don’t know enough about the jobs they are pursuing: Networking to gather this information enables you to better articulate why you are a good “fit” for the job—and this makes you a more competitive candidate.

3. Hiring is risky and expensive for employers: If you are referred to an employer by someone that person knows and trusts, then you are a “safer bet” and a more attractive candidate.

Your Two Goals for Networking

  • Gather “insider” career information and advice from people who work in the career area or company that you’ve targeted as your interest.
  • Gain referrals (connections) to other people who can also provide career advice and information.

Before You Start

  • Identify your career-related interests, skills, and values to establish a meaningful discussion with your networks. The list of Core Professional Competencies will help you identify the skills you’ve developed as a liberal arts student.
  • Research industries and companies, using the CCI Career Library.
  • Identify appropriate contacts in the industries and/or companies that interest you, using MiddNet, professors, family, friends, etc.

Networking Does Not Mean Asking for a Job!

Networking is an essential part of your job-search strategy, but asking directly for a job is not effective networking. This is true for a number of reasons:

  1. To ask directly will likely be off-putting to your contact, who might feel put on the spot. Unless the person knows you, why would she be willing to risk her reputation by referring you to a job lead? On the other hand, nearly everyone is willing to share information and advice with you. Ask for, and learn from, the information and advice offered you—and if the contact is impressed with you and your conversation, and if she does know of a job lead, she may then be inclined to share that lead with you.
  2. If you ask directly for a job and if the answer to your question is “no,” then the conversation becomes a dead end. This misses the opportunity to create a connection with the person or to gain other referrals to other potential contacts.
  3. Limiting your networking connections only to those contacts whom you think may have job leads for you, severely limits the number of connections you can make and hampers your ability to gain important information and advice about the industry, field, or company that you are researching


Remember, letting people know that you are looking for a job is not the same as asking them for a job! Learn more on the CCI website.

What Will Your Summer Internship Story Be?

Tips from CCI’s amazing internships team!

One of the most exciting chapters of your Middlebury education can be participating in an internship! An internship provides an opportunity to explore your interests and gain experience — you might follow a personal passion, connect to your academic work, volunteer with a not-for-profit organization, or confirm your interest in a particular career path. No matter your interests or what you decide to pursue, CCI is here is help you dream big and accomplish your goals.

Finding the right internship is an exciting process. Most students find their internships through online databases, our cohort internship programs, or create their own through networking. Consider where you’d like to be and what kind of organizations you are interested in and then get started!

Here are CCI’s Top Ten Tips for finding or creating your own internship!

  1. Apply to internships on Handshake, as well as the connected database found within Handshake: Liberal Arts Career Network (login is your Middlebury email).
  2. Browse other Handshake Resources, such as Internships: What Have Midd Students Done in the Past?, GoinGlobal (includes US City Guides), ArtSearch, and more.
  3. Check out Middlebury’s Cohort Internship Programs such as Social Impact Corps, FoodWorks, MuseumWorks, CLIMB, and Privilege and Poverty Internships.
  4. Check out CCI’s seven Career Path Pages for internship news, resources, and industry-specific databases and internships.
  5. Learn about CCI resources and how to start your internship search with a Peer Career Advisor at Quick Questions; no appointment necessary. PCAs can also help you create or edit a resume and cover letter; first check out our guides, sample resumes, and other great tools and resources on the CCI web site.
  6. Make an appointment to talk with one of the CCI advisors who can give you targeted advice in your field of interest or the Associate Director for Internships for general internship questions.
  7. Research industries and organizations that are of interest to you and then build your knowledge base and make connections by networking with over 7,500 alumni on MiddNet – our database of alumni who have volunteered to offer you career advice and information about their career field or industry. LinkedIn will offer you opportunities to connect with 30,000 more alums!
  8. Tell your friends, parents, professors, and everyone you know and meet that you are looking. You never know when a conversation will lead to more information, a contact, or a great tip. Get the scoop on our networking page.
  9. Use CCI’s Self-Reflection and Career Exploration Guides to learn more about your skills, interests, and values, or Spotlight on Careers (in Handshake Resources) for targeted information for liberal arts students about career fields and preparation for entering those fields.
  10. If your summer internship is unpaid, apply for CCI’s funding for unpaid internships.

Important: please note that Middlebury does not grant credit or transcript notation for summer internships, so DO NOT accept an internship with an organization that requires that you receive credit or transcript notation.