Tag Archives: Library Spotlight

The Library is canceling RefWorks next year

Legacy RefWorks logo RefWorks 3 logo

The Library is canceling its subscription to RefWorks citation software (Legacy RefWorks and RefWorks 3) next year, effective June 30, 2017. After that date, students, faculty, staff and alumni will not be able to use RefWorks through Middlebury’s subscription. 

Why is the library canceling its subscription to RefWorks?

When we began offering RefWorks ten years ago, there were only a few options for citation management software. RefWorks was one of the most reliable and inexpensive options, and it included most of the citation styles that our students and faculty needed. There are many more options now, and some of these options are more user-friendly, more powerful and less expensive. Specifically, the Library recommends Zotero. As the number of Zotero users at Middlebury has grown, the number of RefWorks users has decreased. Zotero is free to use, open source and portable, and it includes hundreds of citation styles. Our Zotero guide has advice on how to get started.

How can I save my RefWorks citations?

We have begun contacting all RefWorks account holders via email. lf you have a RefWorks account and would like to keep the citations you have stored there, you will need to export them before next summer. We have instructions on how to do that here:

Questions? Ask a librarian! http://go.middlebury.edu/askus

Al-Manhal Arabic e-books and journals (trial ends August 16, 2016)

Through mid-August, our Middlebury and Monterey campuses have trial access to this database from Al-Manhal, the only provider of full-text searchable databases of scholarly and scientific publications from the Arab and Islamic world. AlManhalAl-Manhal’s over 13,000 e-books and 300 peer-reviewed journals can be searched through the user-friendly platform linked above. The full-text content is also fully indexed in Summon. (Allow a few days after this post for all Al-Manhal content to be find-able in Summon by Middlebury and MIIS users.)

Let us know what you think – email eaccess-admin@middlebury.edu or your liaison.

EBL Ebook Program Suspended Until July 1

You may know that Middlebury uses what’s called a “purchase on demand” model for its largest collection of electronic books, EBL (Electronic Book Library). Under this model, we place the catalog records in Midcat but don’t pay anything for the ebook unless and until it’s actually used. Then, we pay a fraction of the list price for each of the first four uses, and on the fifth request, the title is automatically purchased. We have set up seamless access so there’s no delay when you want to use a title, but the library is billed for all uses longer than five minutes, downloads, copies, or printing. There’s a lot more to how the program works, but that’s the broad outline.

Unfortunately, the library has reached the end of its funding for this fiscal year, so we have had to suspend access to the resource until July 1. This is definitely a temporary suspension, and EBL will be back on July 1, along with any titles you may have used but can no longer reach. We’re very sorry for the inconvenience and hope it doesn’t put a serious crimp in your work. Please feel free to contact Douglas Black, Head of Collections Management, for more information.

Take the library with you

Take the library with youYou CAN use library databases from off campus! Just start at the library website:  go.middlebury.edu/lib. When you’re off campus, links on library web pages like Research Guides, Summon and the Journals list will ask you to log in with Midd credentials.

Questions? Ask a librarian: go.middlebury.edu/askus.

Join us at our first Write-In

On Wednesday, May 4th from 8-11 PM, the Writing Center at Middlebury College will join 75 other colleges and universities who sponsor a Write-In between the weeks of April 24-May 5. Supported by CTLR, the Writing Program and the Library, the Write-In fosters a writing community by creating a calm time and space in LIB 201, LIB 145 and the Harman Reading Room for students to write together. A Peer Writing Tutor and a Research Librarian will be on hand in LIB 201 to provide support. During the Write-In, students may work on academic papers, do personal writing, or brainstorm writing for fellowships, internships, and jobs. We’ll provide snacks and prizes. See Swarthmore’s International Write-In page for more information.

Why come to a Write-In?

Writing can be lonely, solitary work. Joining a group of other student writers can be motivating, productive, and calming.

How will this work?

  • Come to Davis Family Library 201 any time between 8-11 PM. Stay from 15 minutes to 3 hours.
  • Sign in to receive prizes
  • If you want, we’ll give you a pen and a pad.
  • Have some tasty snacks (Cheese and Crackers, Chicken Satay, Rice Krispie Treats, Brownies)
  • Meet with a Peer Writing Tutor or Research Librarian.
  • Stay in Lib 201, or go to one of our two reserved quiet spaces: Lib 145 and the Harman Reading Room.

What kind of writing should I do?

  • Academic writing (Start your end of the semester papers this week!) (We’ll provide some research questions.)
  • Personal writing (No idea where to start? We’ll provide some writing prompts.)
  • Brainstorm writing for fellowships, internships, and job applications (We have a handy worksheet to get you started.)

Who is making this great event happen?

What’s an Approval Profile, and Why Does the Library Want to Change Ours?

A brown-bag lunch will be held on May 3 at 12:30 pm, in the Crest Room of the McCullough Student Center, to explore the subject of the library’s approval profile. Douglas Black, the library’s Head of Collections Management, will be presenting, with some sweets and coffee to augment your own lunch. He’ll give some history of the approval program in library acquisitions over the years and lead discussion on its role in the academic library collection of the 21st century.

For context, the library selects, acquires, and provides access to materials in many different ways:

  • upon request by students, faculty, and staff
  • automatic purchase of e-books and streaming media based on usage
  • subscriptions
  • package deals on journal subscriptions and purchased journal archives (“backfiles”)
  • one-time purchases of electronic databases, which often require annual maintenance fees
  • gifts/donations
  • and through automatic purchase via an “approval profile.”

Under the approval model, the library utilizes a library vendor (in our case, YBP Library Services) to purchase automatically books that meet certain criteria (e.g., subject, hardbound only, no workbooks, scholarly publishers only, within a certain price range, etc.).  Middlebury typically purchases about 3,000 volumes/year this way, at an average annual cost of $97,000 in the last few years. We recently conducted a thorough analysis of the program’s effectiveness, finding that print books purchased through the approval profile are used much less than those specifically requested. The library believes some of that money could be spent more effectively and would like to gather input from members of the campus community on reshaping the profile.

Please feel welcome to contact your liaison or Douglas Black (dblack@middlebury.edu or x3635) with any questions (whether or not you can attend the meeting), or comment here in the blog.

AIDS Memorial Quilt Panel on Display

A section of the AIDS Memorial Quilt will be on display on the second floor of the Davis Family Library, beginning the week of April 11 through the end of April. All interested members of the community are invited to visit the display.

MoreAIDS Memorial Quilt Panel on Display April 11-29, Davis Family Library

AIDS Memorial Quilt

(Photo of AIDS Memorial Quilt courtesy of the NAMES Project Foundation)