Tag Archives: internship

Recent Grads – Internship Opportunity at the White House Fall 2017

The application deadline for the Fall 2017 White House Internship Program is coming up.  The application portal will remain open until 11:59PM EDT on June 23, 2017.  Any applications received after the deadline will not be considered.  Please visit https://www.whitehouse.gov/participate/internships/apply to apply.

The Fall 2017 White House Internship Program term runs from September 6 to December 8, 2017.  All applicants must be at least 18 years of age by the Internship Program start date, and must be able to commit to the full internship term to be eligible.  Additionally, applicants must be U.S. citizens and meet at least one of the following criteria to apply:

– Are currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program at a college, community college, or university (two-to-four year institution).

– Have graduated from an undergraduate or graduate degree program at a college, community college, or university (two-to-four year institution) no more than two years before the internship program start date.

– Are a veteran of the United States Armed Forces who possesses a high school diploma or its equivalent and has served on active duty-for any length of time-in the two years preceding the internship program start date.

The White House Internship Program is highly competitive.  Applicants are selected based on their demonstrated commitment to public service, leadership in the community, and commitment to the Trump Administration.  Questions about the White House Internship Program application can be directed to intern_application@who.eop.gov. More information, including details about placement in the White House Internship Program and frequently asked questions, can be found on the White House website.

NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship

Are there are sophomores interested in careers in NOAA-related areas? Then check this out!

Over the past 10 years, the Hollings Scholarship Program has provided approximately 120 undergraduate students per year with tuition support and paid summer internships with NOAA across the country. Hollings has a growing network of over 1200 alumni from over 300 universities. Approximately 75% of Hollings Alumni continue on to graduate school in NOAA mission fields, and more than 90 have been awarded National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships. Recently, two Hollings alum were awarded 2017 Rhodes Scholarships and one was awarded the Marshall Scholarship.

Program Benefits

The Hollings Scholarship Program provides successful undergraduate applicants with awards that include academic assistance (up to $9,500 per year) for two years of full-time study and a 10-week, full-time paid ($700/week) internship at a NOAA facility during the summer.

The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the scholars with hands-on, practical experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory NOAA Scholarship Program orientation and the annual Science & Education Symposium, scientific conferences where students present their research, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.

Hollings Alumni report that the experience influenced their academic and career paths, expanded their professional networks and improved their skills for working in NOAA mission fields. 100% of Hollings Scholars surveyed said that they would recommend this opportunity to other students.

Program Goals

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ernest F. Hollings (Hollings) scholarship program is designed to:

  • increase undergraduate training in oceanic and atmospheric science, research, technology, and education and foster multidisciplinary training opportunities;
  • increase public understanding and support for stewardship of the ocean and atmosphere and improve environmental literacy;
  • recruit and prepare students for public service careers with NOAA and other natural resource and science agencies at the federal, state and local levels of government; and
  • recruit and prepare students for careers as teachers and educators in oceanic and atmospheric science and to improve scientific and environmental education in the United States.

Applications for Summer 18 open in September. Learn more about the scholarship on their website here and also make sure you are on the CTLR email list as they have info sessions and email reminders in the fall.

Had a Job Interview but No Callback? Here’s What to Do Next Time

Days have passed since your job interview, and no one’s called or emailed.

Later, you learn someone else was hired for the position. You were sure you aced the interview and would advance to the next round, but obviously the interviewer saw it differently.

Click here for the full NYT article by Christopher Mele to learn where things may have gone wrong and how to improve your performance for the next time.

Blog Posts from the Office of Digital Learning: ODL Summer Interns, Digital School of Russian, School in Morocco Pre-Immersion, & More!

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Blog Posts from the Office of Digital Learning: Digital Sanctuary, ODL at Domains 17, Digital Learning Internship, Daily Connect Pilot Launch, Listening for Community, and More!

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A Shepherd Intern on Her Experience and the Future

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My name is Nora O’Leary and this summer I am working at HOPE, a non-profit organization that provides food, clothing, and resources to low-income and homeless families in Addison County. HOPE has a food shelf, which is available to families once a month, and a surplus area stocked with day-old food from Hannaford’s supermarket and other generous locals. The organization earns money from sales at their thrift shop, Retroworks, which they use to aid families with a variety of expenses, from heating bills, to laundry vouchers, to car repairs. HOPE also provides assistance to homeless individuals with basic necessities, camping supplies, and with the difficult transition out of homelessness. Because HOPE is not a government-affiliated organization, the staff is able to be flexible and provide financial assistance based on a person’s needs at any given time rather than following strict guidelines. That means there is a lot of personal interaction with the clients, because the staff seeks to hear everyone’s stories and understand their struggles, in order to help them in the most effective way possible. As HOPE’s receptionist this summer, I have had the opportunity to have the initial contact with every client who walks in the door, hear their stories, and figure out how best to help them.

Coming into this summer, I wasn’t sure how this internship would relate to my (hopefully) future career as an elementary school teacher. However, I’ve found myself thinking about how closely related the cycle of poverty and education really are. Many clients that HOPE works with struggle with obesity, or drug addictions, have been incarcerated, or have never finished high school. These problems are ones that people are often harshly judged for in our society, because they all involve making some poor choices along the way. However, more and more I have thought about the young child within each of those clients who comes in. Who taught that child about nutrition, or warned them against drug use, or encouraged them to release frustration in healthy, non-violent ways? What about the child who quit school to start working and help his parents pay to keep the heating on in the winter? Many of the clients who come into HOPE everyday never had someone to teach them important lessons about finances and managing money, or a positive role model whose example they could follow in life. A teacher can be a hugely positive influence on a child, and this job has made me so eager to be that for a child someday. I continue to think about how a client’s life might have been different had they someone who believed in them, and encouraged them to work their hardest in and out of school everyday. I am hugely grateful for so many things this summer has taught me, but motivating me to continue on my way to becoming a public school teacher is an unforeseen and wonderful outcome

Nora O’Leary, ’17

To Have Patients

13584911_10154290273964253_2364320571155775360_oWith the Open Door Clinic, I have become aware of a whole new community that exists in Addison County of which I was not previously aware. In Addison County, roughly half of residents are uninsured. While most of us can go into a hospital and show an insurance card to avoid heavy fees, many Vermonters are left staring down big hospital bills with very little means through which to pay them. However, the issue is not even this simple. For migrant workers in Vermont, many do not understand the system and, when they receive their bills, do not quite know what to do with them since they are not in their native language. This is just one issue that I have been confronted with and helped alleviate through proactive communications with patients. While these problems are large scale, and will therefore need solutions on such a scale, I can still feel that my contribution has been worthwhile: helping a migrant worker, who provides for his small family that he started in Vermont, get his bills paid can be an experience that would be far more significant than one had serving my superiors coffee as an intern on Wall Street.
In the future, I see myself doing work that will help people, not because of their economic or social advantages but because we owe people help because of their humanity. At the Open Door Clinic, my coworkers have been consummate professionals in refraining from judging patients. In this line of work, we must become pure assets that always work for the benefit of our patients. In this sense, the job becomes all the more fulfilling through intentional service in which we deny ourselves our own wishes. This type of job has been very fulfilling for me and my coworkers have been role models for me to teach what it means to serve those that are marginalized in our communities.
– JJ Moser ‘16.5