Tag Archives: international

GoinGlobal Adds New Training Dates to Help You Navigate Finding Your Dream Opportunities

Interested in finding a job or internship across town or around the world?

  • Learn how to connect your career objectives with hiring opportunities by identifying key employers and industry contacts for informational interviews and professional networking. 
  • Get a realistic understanding of work permit and visa requirements, financial considerations and other prime factors critical to career success in a new location.  
  • Identify American employers seeking to hire international professionals for their U.S. operations through H-1B visa petitions – and learn how to connect this information to current job opportunities.  

Below, you can register for a 1-hour, web-based training session exclusively for students whose academic institutions, like Middlebury, are current subscribers to Going Global’s career resources database services. You can access GoinGlobal through Handshake’s Resources pages.

Tuesday, May 5 – Time: 7pm EDT Register

Tuesday, May 19 – Time: 4pm EDTRegister

GoinGlobal Adds New Training Dates to Help You Navigate Finding Your Dream Opportunities

Interested in finding a job or internship across town or around the world?

  • Learn how to connect your career objectives with hiring opportunities by identifying key employers and industry contacts for informational interviews and professional networking. 
  • Get a realistic understanding of work permit and visa requirements, financial considerations and other prime factors critical to career success in a new location.  
  • Identify American employers seeking to hire international professionals for their U.S. operations through H-1B visa petitions – and learn how to connect this information to current job opportunities.  

Below, you can register for a 1-hour, web-based training session exclusively for students whose academic institutions, like Middlebury, are current subscribers to Going Global’s career resources database services. You can access GoinGlobal through Handshake’s Resources pages.

DateTime/Time zoneRegister
Tuesday, April 21, 20204:00 p.m. EDTRegister
Tuesday, May 05, 20207:00 p.m. EDTRegister
Tuesday, May 19, 20204:00 p.m. EDTRegister

Weekly Highlight: Japan Summer-Service Learning

Application deadline for Summer 2020–TODAY! Visit: go/jssl and access the application on the bottom of the page.

The Japan Summer Service-Learning Program (JSSL) is a collaborative, intercultural service-learning program that brings together undergraduates from Middlebury, International Christian University (ICU), and multiple member universities of the Service-Learning Asia Network. Participating students work, learn, and engage with local residents in the Tokyo metropolitan region as well as in Tenryumura – a small village in the mountains of Nagano Prefecture. While this is usually a four-week summer program, our summer 2020 session will be for three weeks, ending prior to the start of the Tokyo Olympics.

Xuan He ’20, a JSSL alumna, shares about her experience with the JSSL Program during the Cross Cultural Community Service’s (CCCS) 10th Anniversary.

Last year, student participants reflected on their time in Japan using the new Middlebury Experiential Learning Life Cycle (ELLC) hub website. This is a new reflection resource that educators across Middlebury College created together to support students across different immersive learning experiences to reflect on their learning.

Below are reflections from some of last summer’s participants.

Xiaoyu Wu ’22:

My name is Xiaoyu, and I am a participant in a summer program called JSSL (Japan Summer Service Learning). This program lasts for one month and provides participants the opportunity to experience urban and rural life of Japan. I enjoyed every minute of this program, but the thing that gave me the strongest impact was the monument of Chinese soldiers, which I saw in a rural village (Tenryu Village) in Japan.   

Sometimes I wonder why I am doing volunteer services in Japan while my own country needs help. The answer became clear after my journey to Tenryu Village. There were a lot of tragic stories in this village during WWII— Families broke apart because of the war; foreign soldiers and prisoners of war were forced to participate in the construction of the dam. When Kawakami san was giving this speech about the local history, I felt a mix of conflicted feelings— Anger, unfamiliarity, frustration… Why do we have to uncover the scars of the past again? The purpose is not to re-trigger the hatred but to remember the war, just as Kawakami san mentioned in his speech, “悲劇を忘れないように語り継、この事実を後世に伝えるのも我々の役目かなと思っています (I think we should not forget the tragedy, and it is our role to convey the story to the future generations).” 

There are indeed a lot of stereotypes exist between China and Japan, and it is our mission, the younger generations’ responsibility, to rediscover the good in humanity and break down these stereotypes. Because many people do not know that when forced labors were suffering, villagers shared their limited resources with them. Even after the war, there is a Japanese lady who places flowers in front of the monument every day for over 50 years.

Sam Hernandez ’22:

Hello, I’m Sam Hernandez and I am a participant in the Japanese Summer Service Learning program. During the month of July, me and an international team of students set out to participate in various service projects throughout the city of Mitaka and the rural Tenryū village. Something that has pleasantly surprised me about this experience was how easy it has been to work with people from various different cultures in a country where we are foreigners to make a difference in people’s lives.

While I say it has been easy, that means relatively. We have worked incredibly hard as a group and put in a lot of effort. But the reward we get, the memories, the experiences, the connections, they’re all so incredibly valuable that having to put in some effort is nothing. The benefits to this program will be lifelong. Not only that, but we have done meaningful service as well. The benefits for those we served are hopefully even more meaningful. Essentially, I learned that it doesn’t take much to make a difference. Whether it be helping your members make paper at a service center or pulling up ragweed in a park. Even just listening to an elderly citizen recount their youth and most valuable memories. We made an impact together as a team of various people from different backgrounds, beliefs, ideals, and goals. In only a month, we became friends. Our differences were embraced and welcomed. It was a most pleasant surprise.

Japan Summer Service-Learning program alumni – Brenda Martinez ’22, Sam Hernandez ’22, Xuan He ’20, Xiaoyu Wu ’22, and Stephen Chen 19.5 – gather for a light-hearted reunion with CCE’s Kristen Mullins and Atsuko Kuronuma during Ms. Kuronuma’s recent visit from Tokyo.

Consider applying for this amazing program. Visit go/jssl and access the application at the bottom of the page.

Interested in Japan? Check Out 2 Ways to Live There Post-Grad!

JET has sent more than 70,000 participants from around the globe (including more than 35,800 Americans) to work in schools, boards of education, and government offices throughout Japan. What makes JET unique is that it is the only teaching exchange program managed by the government of Japan. With more than 55 countries around the world currently participating in JET, this program offers a unique cultural exchange opportunity to meet people from all around the world, living and working in Japan. Before departing for Japan and upon return, there are a number of JET alumni organizations that host social, volunteer and professional development activities to help individuals through the transition process. Check out a fun video about JET HERE.

Click on the two paid opportunities below on Handshake to learn more about working in Japan with JET – DEADLINES NOVEMBER 30 @ 3:10PM:

Assistant Language Teacher (ALT)

ALTs are engaged in language instruction and make up over 90% of all JET Program participants. They are mainly assigned to local boards of education or elementary, junior high or senior high schools and carry out their duties under the guidance of language teachers’ consultants or Japanese teachers of English (JTEs) as specified by the supervisor and/or principal of the board of education and/or school. ALTs should enjoy working with students and sharing their own culture. There is no Japanese language requirement for ALTs. 

Coordinator for International Relations (CIR)

CIRs are engaged in internationalization activities and translation/interpretation and are placed in administrative offices of local authorities or related organizations. This position requires a high-degree of fluency and positions are less than 10% of all JET Program participants. Their duties are carried out as specified by the supervisor at individual contracting organizations.

Middlebury Social Impact Corps – Student Info Sessions

Middlebury Social Impact Corps – Student Info Sessions. 

Sign up on Handshake by clicking the date you plan to attend.

Middlebury Social Impact Corps connects students to the front line of social change with unique global internship opportunities. A select cohort of Middlebury College and MIIS graduate students are chosen and matched with a social enterprise or NGO for an 8 week international summer internship. The program is an entry point to gaining deeper understanding and curating the tools needed to lead a purpose-driven career where participants receive tangible work experience with a social impact. 2019 partners: Impact Monterey County (in Monterey, CA), Andean Alliance for Sustainable Development (in Cuzco, Peru) and Cape Eleuthera Institute (in Eleuthera, Bahamas)

Come learn more about the program, host sites, and how to apply! Check out the details of each one here on Handshake:

Impact Monterey County

Andean Alliance for Sustainable Development

Cape Eleuthera Institute

Middlebury Social Impact Corps – Student Info Sessions

Middlebury Social Impact Corps – Student Info Sessions. 

Sign up on Handshake by clicking the date you plan to attend.

Middlebury Social Impact Corps connects students to the front line of social change with unique global internship opportunities. A select cohort of Middlebury College and MIIS graduate students are chosen and matched with a social enterprise or NGO for an 8 week international summer internship. The program is an entry point to gaining deeper understanding and curating the tools needed to lead a purpose-driven career where participants receive tangible work experience with a social impact. 2019 partners: Impact Monterey County (in Monterey, CA), Andean Alliance for Sustainable Development (in Cuzco, Peru) and Cape Eleuthera Institute (in Eleuthera, Bahamas)

Come learn more about the program, host sites, and how to apply! Check out the details of each one here on Handshake:

Impact Monterey County

Andean Alliance for Sustainable Development

Cape Eleuthera Institute

“Terror in a handful of dust”: Exploring the State-Level Pursuit of Radiological Weapons

From our colleagues at the Franklin Environmental Center:

Monday, September 24 at 4:30 PM in Axinn 232

This talk will be given by Sarah Bidgood, Senior Research Associate and Project Manager, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Middlebury Institute of International Studies.  Experts often talk about radiological weapons in the context of terrorism. Significantly less attention is paid to the potential for national governments to develop these weapons. Researchers at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies have found that a host of countries, including the United States, Soviet Union, United Kingdom, and Iraq, pursued radiological weapons in the past. Using primary source and archival material, they have sought to pinpoint why these programs began, why they stopped, and how this history can inform policy today.

Ms. Bidgood will also be here at CCI on Friday, 9/21 at 12:30 to host a session focusing on the Institute’s Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies MA program, the new J-term internship program, and the CNS’s Summer Undergraduate Nonproliferation Program. You can read more about that event here.