Tag Archives: Government, Law and Policy

Meet the CEO of a huge international company and learn about creating a global culture

This promises to be a stimulating evening!

Creating a Common Culture in a Global Enterprise

Monday, December 3, 7:30 – 9:30pm in Axinn Center 229

Carlos Brito, CEO Anheuser-Busch InBev, will discuss the importance of culture to AB InBev and the organization’s efforts to create a common culture in the world’s largest brewer to deliver on their goal to bring people together for a better world.

Coro Fellowship in Public Affairs

The Coro Fellows Program develops emerging leaders to work and lead across different sectors by equipping them with knowledge, skills, and networks to accelerate positive change.

One of the highest-rated leadership programs in the country, the Coro Fellows Program is a nine-month, full-time graduate-level fellowship that prepares young professionals for effective leadership in all areas of civic life. Fellows are equipped with Coro’s unique, hands-on leadership training, built on understanding complexity and solving problems across traditional boundaries. If you aspire to serve the common good, to connect people across divides, and to tackle some of the most daunting challenges our society faces, the Coro Fellowship in Public Affairs will give you the tools you need to make an impact.
Through the Fellowship program, Fellows learn by doing, gaining real job experience on project assignments through placements in a variety of sectors: government, business, political campaigns, and nonprofit organizations. In weekly seminars, the twelve Fellows develop high-level skills in self-awareness, group dynamics, critical thinking and decision-making. During Issue Weeks, Fellows work as a cohort to take a deep dive into a single topic, exploring critical and challenging dilemmas in public policy. Utilizing the city as a classroom, Fellows gain hands-on experience and a deeper understanding of complex public issues, organizations, and people. Fellows also benefit from a national alumni network of over 10,000 whose members include influential leaders from all sectors.

The application deadline is January 9, 2019. The application requires 3 essays, 2 letters of recommendation, and official transcripts.  So it’s probably a good idea to get started soon.

More details are in Handshake and also here:  http://www.corofellowship.org/

Research Assistant JOB at Brookings Institution – with an alum doing the hiring

This looks to be a good one with Jana Parsons ’16 working at Brookings and on the hiring committee.

The Hamilton Project (THP) at the Brookings Institution produces research and policy proposals on how to create a growing economy that benefits more Americans. Our economic strategy reflects a judgment that long term prosperity is best achieved by making economic growth broad-based, by enhancing individual economic security, and by embracing a role for effective government in making needed public investments.

The Research Assistant will help execute and develop an overall policy agenda and policy strategy for The Hamilton Project. Research potential policy areas and communicate with leading academics, policymakers, and practitioners to support the Director and Policy Director in identifying promising potential topics for THP’s policy agenda.

Research Assistant positions will begin during the summer of 2019 and involve a commitment of at least one year.

Check out the full details and apply in Handshake here

Career Development over Thanksgiving break

The experts at Koru have written a great article on 5 Ways to Kick Start Your Job Search Over Thanksgiving Break.

Kick Start Your Job Search Over Thanksgiving Break

1. Don’t avoid the question, “What do you want to do after college?”

Seek it out. Talk to your friends and family to get advice and help. You’ll be amazed by how many people will want to help you achieve your dreams if you simply involve them. The more people who know you’re on the job hunt, the better.

And by the way, it’s OK to still be unsure of what career path or even first job is right for you. Again, talk to people about it. Seek advice from those who know you best.

Here are some helpful conversation starters to use over Thanksgiving Break:

  • I feel like you know me really well, and I’m interested in what you think I would be great at.

  • When you graduated from college, what were some of the things you considered doing?

  • You seem to love what you are doing. How did you end up in the field that you are in? Did you know this was what you wanted to do right after college?

  • I love ____, but I’m unsure of how I could use it after college. Do you have any ideas?

  • I’ve always loved ____, and I’m looking for some advice on how I can couple my passion for this into a career. What are your thoughts?

2. Start scheduling informational interviews, shadowing, and coffee chats for Winter Term.

Winter Term. Use it as an opportunity to get some new experiences or meet with people in an industry or at a company where you may want to work. You can start planning over Thanksgiving Break.

  • Set up coffee chats for 30 minutes with local alums from in companies where you may want to work. If they aren’t local, schedule a virtual chat.

  • Check out Handshake to search what internships are out there. What sounds interesting? What locations have a lot of opportunities?

  • If you are home for Winter Term, ask your family and friends for opportunities to come in and shadow them for a day.

3. Teach yourself job skills, pad your resume, and learn something fun.

You are what you do. As you get closer to graduation and start having more conversations with employers, you will quickly realize that experience is worth infinitely more than a perfect GPA.

Take advantage of your college break to learn something outside of your comfort zone or something that you are curious about but would never have time to do during school. There are amazing free resources out there for just this purpose. For example, know you are into marketing? Why not take a free course on Google Analytics? Interested in product management? It is helpful to understand basic coding. Done some creative work? Share it and learn more about great design on Behance.

4. Polish your resume.

When applying for opportunities, your resume, cover letter, and application materials are your first impression. These documents will help you land an interview, so it is important to detail your experience and accomplishments clearly and concisely.

While there is no one right way to write a resume, there are guidelines you should follow to convey a positive, meaningful message. Additionally, for each position you apply for, you should write a new cover letter that is geared toward that specific job and company/organization.

To get started:

  • Review the Resume and Cover Letter Guide for all majors and industries. This guide outlines suggestions for formatting, organization, and content and can walk you through the process of creating either document. Included is also a list of action verbs.

  • Utilize the list of Core Professional Competencies to highlight the skills you have gained during your experiences

  • View resume samples here

5. Polish your LinkedIn Profile and your social media brand.

Most of the students or recent college grads think that they are in good, or at least decent, shape on LinkedIn and social media. Few actually are.

Spend a couple of hours on your LinkedIn profile. It’ll pay back big time. Here are a few key things to look at:

  • Summary — This is your chance to tell people about your passions, skills, and goals. Things like this often don’t jump out on a resume, so your summary is a great opportunity to share them.

  • Job history — Worried your summer working at the hot dog stand won’t cut? Don’t. Put it down. Less than glamorous job experience shows that you have grit.

  • Study abroad — If you studied abroad, make sure to include it on your profile. Studying abroad shows you are curious, able to push yourself beyond your comfort zone, and have the ability to understand different cultures.

When you’re through, Google yourself. What shows up? While having a strong LinkedIn profile is important, make sure that your past social media behavior does not damage your online brand.

6. Take a break, have fun, be yourself.

Spend time relaxing and celebrating with family and friends. After giving your all these last few months, you deserve it.

Important Deadlines for Students Planning Winter Term Internships for Credit!

Are you planning to take part in an internship for credit during Winter Term 2019? Please pay attention to these important deadlines!

Deadline – November 15:
Register for a Winter Term placeholder class in Banner Web by 4:00 pm on Thursday, November 15
if your internship has not yet been approved  by CCI and the Curriculum Committee.

Students who have already received an approval email from CCI and the Curriculum Committee must follow all instructions in their award letter and register for the internship course in Banner Web no later than November 15.

Deadline – November 30:
Secure a Winter Term internship AND complete an application for credit. No applications accepted after November 30. See steps and timeline for applying for credit for your internship at go/WTinternships.

You will find all the information you need about Winter Term internships at go/WTinternships, including the personal essay prompt and sample academic sources. For additional questions, please contact Cheryl Whitney Lower.

Trauma and the U.S. Immigration System: Family Separation, Immigrant Detention, and Undocumented Work

Thursday, November 15th, 7:30-9:00 PM in Dana Auditorium

Participants include Sarah Rogerson, Clinical Professor of Law, Director of Immigration Law Clinic, Director of Law Clinic and Justice Center at Albany Law School, Dr. Andrea Green, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the New Americans Clinic at University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, Migrant Justice, Hannah Krutiansky ’19, and Meron Benti ’19

This panel will feature practitioners and activists focused on responding to current immigration policies. Sarah Rogerson represents immigrant detainees in the Albany County Jail. Dr. Andrea Green will speak about the effects of family separation and immigration policies on children’s and family health. Migrant Justice is based in Vermont and advocates for migrant workers rights, and has promoted the Milk with Dignity campaign in Vermont. Hannah Krutiansky has worked with RAICES working with detained immigrant families. Meron Benti ’19 is an asylum recipient. This event brings together migrant advocates who are working on behalf of the most vulnerable migrant populations. They offer witness to the atrocities enacted against migrants and are working to address injustices at the institutional level as well as engaging individual needs of migrants.

This event is co-sponsored by American Studies, Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity, Juntos, Alianza, History Department, Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies, and Latin American Studies/IGST

Trauma and the U.S. Immigration System: Family Separation, Immigrant Detention, and Undocumented Work

Thursday, November 15th, 7:30-9:00 PM in Dana Auditorium

Participants include Sarah Rogerson, Clinical Professor of Law, Director of Immigration Law Clinic, Director of Law Clinic and Justice Center at Albany Law School, Dr. Andrea Green, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the New Americans Clinic at University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, Migrant Justice, Hannah Krutiansky ’19, and Meron Benti ’19

This panel will feature practitioners and activists focused on responding to current immigration policies. Sarah Rogerson represents immigrant detainees in the Albany County Jail. Dr. Andrea Green will speak about the effects of family separation and immigration policies on children’s and family health. Migrant Justice is based in Vermont and advocates for migrant workers rights, and has promoted the Milk with Dignity campaign in Vermont. Hannah Krutiansky has worked with RAICES working with detained immigrant families. Meron Benti ’19 is an asylum recipient. This event brings together migrant advocates who are working on behalf of the most vulnerable migrant populations. They offer witness to the atrocities enacted against migrants and are working to address injustices at the institutional level as well as engaging individual needs of migrants.

This event is co-sponsored by American Studies, Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity, Juntos, Alianza, History Department, Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies, and Latin American Studies/IGST