Tag Archives: For Staff

Kareem Khalifa awarded ACLS Burkhardt Fellowship

Kareem Khalifa (Philosophy) has been selected by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) as a 2017 Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellow. This prestigious program provides a full year of support for recently tenured faculty members as they pursue ambitious scholarship at a consequential stage of their careers. The fellowship will enable Kareem to spend the 2019-2020 academic year at the Institute for Liberal Arts at Emory University pursuing a research project titled Explanation as Inferential Practice.

Spring Student Symposium Update: Application Deadline 3/2

Faculty and Staff: Please encourage your students to apply. Encouragement from a faculty or staff member is the largest reason students chose to participate in the Spring Student Symposium! Students from all four years and all departments and programs are invited to apply.

The application deadline is Thursday, March 2, 2017. For more information and the online application, see the Undergraduate Research website at http://go.middlebury.edu/sym.

Research in a class, independently, or through an internship; the experience of producing a creative work; or another academic project that lends itself to a display, a poster or oral presentation, are all eligible for the symposium. Both individual and class presentations are welcome. Student’s applications must include a project description (200 words) that has been approved by a faculty or staff sponsor. Final abstract revisions are due 3/20.

The 2017 Spring Student Symposium will take place all day Friday, April 21 in McCardell Bicentennial Hall with presentations of student work across the disciplines.

Join us for our 11th year of celebrating the academic and creative endeavors of Middlebury students!

The Spring Student Symposium Planning Committee

“The Student Symposium was one of my favorite days of the year. Presenting my work was very rewarding, but the day was great because of the quality of everyone’s work and presentation. Students at Middlebury work hard, and the Symposium is an amazing way to celebrate achievements and also gain essential presentation skills.”– Symposium Participant

Eilat Glikman named 2017 Cottrell Scholar

Eilat Glikman (Physics), a 2014 recipient of the Cottrell College Science Award, has been named a 2017 Cottrell Scholar by the Research Corporation, a private foundation that aids basic research in the physical sciences. This program is highly selective—only two-dozen top early career academic scientists were selected this year—and it champions the very best early career teacher-scholars in chemistry, physics, and astronomy. This honor comes with a $100,000 award for Eilat for research and teaching. She plans to use this award to study quasar activity and its role in regulating how galaxies and their nuclear supermassive black holes grow, as well as to develop educational opportunities to make astronomy and physics more inclusive, with the ultimate goal of having more voices and minds contributing to solving the problems of the disciplines. Congratulations Eilat!

Jeff Munroe receives Fulbright teaching/research fellowship to Austria

Jeff Munroe (Geology) has been awarded a 2017-18 Fulbright Scholar grant for teaching/research in Austria where he will be a Visiting Professor of Natural Science at the University of Innsbruck. Jeff will contribute lectures or a course for the graduate program in Quaternary Geology during the spring semester of 2018. His research for this grant, titled Speleothem-based Reconstruction of Last Glacial Maximum Paleoclimate involves collaboration with Austrian colleagues in one of the world’s foremost cave research laboratories. Samples collected from caves as part of Jeff’s long-term research in the Uinta Mountains of Utah will be analyzed in Innsbruck to shed new light on climatic conditions in the Rocky Mountains during the last glaciation.

Academic Roundtable – Fake News, Alternative Facts, and the Toxic Web: Strategies for Understanding and Coping with a Changing Media Universe

Please join us on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 12:15 pm in the CTLR located in the Davis Family Library, Suite 225.

We live now in a world where the traditional media has been supplanted by a much more complicated set of media outlets and platforms. How do we understand this new reality? What sorts of strategies might we use to keep ourselves informed? What sorts of media literacies must we cultivate in ourselves and in our students ?

Join us for a panel discussion led by Amy Collier (Office of Digital Learning), Sue Halpern (EAM), Terry Simpkins (Library), and Jason Mittell (FMMC)

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP for lunch by 4 pm on Friday, March 10, 2017.

The Academic Roundtable is co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching, Learning, & Research

and the Library

Employing Middlebury Students this Summer

You may be thinking about employing a Middlebury College student to work in your department this summer. What a great opportunity for both you and the student!  The student can learn important skills (or enhance those they already have) that they will use throughout their life – customer service, time management, conflict resolution, verbal and written communication skills, and so on.

The Student Employment Office Web page has been updated to reflect this summer’s procedures and policies http://www.middlebury.edu/offices/business/seo/summer.

Please familiarize yourself with these policies so you are well informed and can provide information to the student(s) you hire.

 

College Community Chorus Launches New Season

We welcome all who love to sing to join in rehearsals at the start of a new season, as we prepare music for our spring concerts in early May.  You’ll have an opportunity to explore uplifting music that celebrates the wonder of star-filled nights and an awakening to new possibilities, from a rarely heard song by Beethoven to traditional African music and breathtaking new works by contemporary American composers.

community chorus singers

Community members and College staff and faculty rehearse in Mead Chapel

College faculty, staff, students, alumni, and community members rehearse together on Sunday and Tuesday evenings, 7-8:30 p.m. We begin on Feb. 5, 7 & 12 in Mahaney Center for the Arts (room 221); on and after Feb. 14 rehearsals move to Mead Chapel.
Concerts are slated for Saturday evening, May 6 (Brandon Town Hall) and Sunday afternoon, May 7 (Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts). We ask singers to join no later than February 21 and to attend at least one rehearsal each week.

Here’s a preview of the program:

  • Two beautifully crafted classical works that speak of hope in the midst of grief: Elegischer Gesang by Ludwig van Beethoven and Let nothing ever grieve thee by Johannes Brahms.
  • Inspired by the legend of the phoenix, contemporary Norwegian-American composer Ola Gjeilo and poet Charles Silvestri recently wrote Across the vast, eternal sky, scored for piano and string quartet. ‘This is my grace, to be restored, born again, in flame; do not despair that I am gone away; I will appear again when the sunset paints flames across the vast eternal sky.’
  • The traditional song Shosholoza originated among migrant works traveling from Zimbabwe to work in South African mines. Featured in the movie Invictus, its meaning may come from a combination of both Ndebele and Zulu words meaning to push forward, endeavor, or strive.
  • American composer Randall Thompson creates a stirring setting of Robert Frost’s poem Choose something like a star. ‘It asks of us a certain height, so when at times the mob is swayed to carry praise or blame too far, we may choose something like a star to stay our minds on and be staid.’
  • Thirty-year-old composer Daniel Elder recently completed an energetic arrangement of Sara Teasdale’s poem May Night. ‘The spring is fresh and fearless and every leaf is new… Here in the moving shadows I catch my breath and sing—My heart is fresh and fearless and over-brimmed with spring.’
  • Two settings of a James Agee text, entitled Sure on this Shining Nightone by 20th-century American composer Samuel Barber and the second, an expressive arrangement by award-winning contemporary composer Morten Lauridsen. ‘Sure on this shining night of star made shadows round, kindness must watch for me this side the ground…’
  • The Awakening, with words and music by pianist-composer Joseph M. Martin. He portrays a dream in which no choir remains ‘to sing to change the world, only silence…’ But then we ‘Awake! All voices join as one! Let music live!’

Contact conductor Jeff Rehbach (rehbach@middlebury.edu) or 802.989.7355 with any questions, and check out the Chorus and its history at go.middlebury.edu/communitychorus.