Tag Archives: Faculty Grants

Max Ward receives grants to support his academic leave and book preparation

Max Ward (History) has received  grants from the Japan Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities Japan-US Friendship Commission (NEH-JUSFC)​ in support of his research during his 2015-16 academic leave. He is currently a Visiting Researcher at Waseda University in Tokyo Japan, where he is completing a book manuscript titled Ghost in the Machine: Imperial Ideology and Thought Reform in Interwar Japan. ​This book explores the Japanese state’s efforts to police political dissent in the 1920s and how such efforts developed into an extensive apparatus to rehabilitate political criminals throughout the Japanese empire in the 1930s. His next project will analyze the contested claims to urban space in postwar Tokyo.

Priscilla Bremser and colleagues awarded NSF grant for Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates

Priscilla Bremser (Mathematics) is Middlebury’s representative in a network of 61 liberal arts institutions that will benefit from a Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates (TEU) grant awarded to Vassar College by the National Science Foundation. Entitled Summer STEM Teaching Experiences for Undergraduates from Liberal Arts Institutions, this grant will provide opportunities in each of the next five summers for 24 students from the network to participate in programs that involve a pedagogy course (math or science) and a teaching practicum  with urban high school students. Co-investigators are faculty at Barnard College, Brown University,  Bryn Mawr College,  and Trinity College. Although no funds come directly to Middlebury, this grant provides an exciting opportunity for which our students are eligible to apply.

Erik Bleich Receives NSF Funding for Collaborative Research on Free Speech

Erik Bleich (Political Science) has received funding as a Co-PI on a National Science Foundation collaborative grant for a multi-year study titled Comparative Free Speech Jurisprudence. This project involves researchers from multiple countries who are assembling information on judicial decisions about freedom of expression in supreme courts around the world. Bleich will lead the data collection effort with regard to the European Court of Human Rights. At least two Middlebury College undergraduates will be involved in this research.

Erik Bleich Receives NSF Funding for Collaborative Research on Free Speech

Erik Bleich (Political Science) has received funding as a Co-PI on a National Science Foundation collaborative grant for a multi-year study titled Comparative Free Speech Jurisprudence. This project involves researchers from multiple countries who are assembling information on judicial decisions about freedom of expression in supreme courts around the world. Bleich will lead the data collection effort with regard to the European Court of Human Rights. At least two Middlebury College undergraduates will be involved in this research.

Murray Dry and Keegan Callanan receive funding for Constitution Day Initiative

Murray Dry and Keegan Callanan (both Political Science) have received funding from the Jack Miller Center to host a lecture as part of the Constitution Day Initiative. This lecture will reach a wide range of students, faculty, and members of the Middlebury community and will foster an understanding of the great constitutional questions that have animated our national life from the founding to the present day.

Jeff Carpenter, Emiliano Huet-Vaughn, Peter Matthews, and Andrea Robbett receive contract from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Jeff Carpenter, Emiliano Huet-Vaughn, Peter Matthews, and Andrea Robbett (all Economics) have received a contract from the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for a project titled Dominance Violations in Consumer Credit Choices. This research has the primary goal of revealing the welfare consequences of alternative consumer credit product designs, and will hopefully provide policy insights founded in behavioral economics. At least one undergraduate student will be involved in this project.

Vermont Genetics Network Awards for Glen Ernstrom, Clarissa Parker, AnGayle Vasiliou, and Michael Durst

Vermont Genetics Network grants for Research in the Biomedical Sciences
Middlebury College is one of the baccalaureate partner institutions participating in a major grant from the National Institutes of Health to the University of Vermont. This grant continues the Vermont Genetics Network support that has been an important source of funding for faculty and student research during the past decade. The following faculty members received individual grants from this program to support their research this year:

Glen Ernstrom (Biology & Neuroscience) received a renewal of his project grant titled Genetic Analysis of Neurotransmitter Release in C. Elegans. The proposed research will help to clarify nerve signaling mechanisms and potentially lead to improved drug therapies for neural disorders. The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort for Prof. Ernstrom from June 2015-May 2016 and includes a summer stipend for one undergraduate student.

Clarissa Parker (Psychology & Neuroscience) received a project grant titled Genome-wide Association for Ethanol Sensitivity in the DO Mouse Population. The goal of this work is to use a highly recombinant mouse population to map genes associated with ethanol sensitivity. Understanding the pathways linking genetic variation and expression to neuronal function may enable targeting of specific molecules to treat alcohol use disorders in humans. The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort for Prof. Parker from June 2015-May 2016 and includes summer stipends for two undergraduate students.

AnGayle (AJ) Vasiliou (Chemistry and Biochemistry) received a renewal of her project grant titled Thermal Composition of Biomass: Molecular Pathways for Sulfur Chemistry. The aim of this research is to elucidate the detailed chemical mechanisms and kinetics associated with the thermal decomposition of sulfur compounds found in biomass feedstock. The results of this work can be used to develop a sound strategy to suppress the formation of poisonous sulfur compounds during biomass decomposition, generating clean liquid fuels and ultimately lowering sulfur emissions. The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort for Prof. Vasiliou from June 2015-May 2016 and includes summer stipends for two undergraduate students.

Michael Durst (Physics) received a project grant titled High-Speed 3D Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging with Temporal Focusing Microscopy. The proposed work aims to improve the speed of 3D multiphoton microscopy through temporal focusing, with the goal of reaching video-rate 3D imaging in biological tissue. The grant provides funding for summer and academic-year effort for Prof. Durst from June 2015-May 2016 and includes a summer stipend for one undergraduate student.