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End-of-Year Reception!

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

The School in France held its End of Term Reception for students, faculty, staff, host families and foyers at the Madeleine Center on May 5th. It was a lovely, and for some, the last occasion to get together and to celebrate the end of a challenging but thrilling semester and/or academic year in Paris. We profusely thank again the following individuals: our faculty, without whom our academic program wouldn’t be what it is today; EUSA France for its engaging internship program; and our host families and foyers who contribute so much to the success of our students’ cultural and linguistic immersion experience. Merci et bonne fin de séjour à tous nos étudiants!DSCN0381 DSCN0378 DSCN0355DSCN0341DSCN0339DSCN0338DSCN0331DSCN0327DSCN0321

Evening at the Opera !

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

12 lucky students attended one of the final rehearsals of the ballet, L’Histoire de Manon, that is currently being performed at the Palais Garnier. For more information on the ballet, please see the following page of the Opéra National de Paris’ website : https://www.operadeparis.fr/saison-2014-2015/ballet/l-histoire-de-manon-kenneth-macmillan. DSCN0301

Middlebury in Prehistoric France !

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Students in Bordeaux and Poitiers spent last Saturday in Périgord first on a walking tour of the medieval and Renaissance quarters of the city of Périgueux, then discovering two of the region’s more important prehistoric sites ; Périgord is often referred to as the cradle of European civilization as it offers a plethora of Paleolithic sites to visit. At Laugerie Basse (http://www.lascaux-dordogne.com/fr/patrimoine-culturel/site-monument-site-archeologique/abri-prehistorique-de-laugerie-basse), our group explored two rockshelters first occupied in 15 000 BC and then at Lascaux II (http://www.lascaux.culture.fr/), they studied the reproductions of the original Lascaux cave paintings which are estimated to be over 17 000 years old! Both of the afternoon visits allowed students to learn in a fun and engaging way more about what life was like for prehistoric man. Photo 11-04-2015 11 34 23 Photo 11-04-2015 14 11 50 Photo 11-04-2015 15 33 22 Photo 11-04-2015 15 34 41

Chantilly in the Spring

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

A handful of student of students recently joined historian, Xavier Le Person, for a guided tour of the Chantilly château. One of the most picturesque castles in the Paris area, the impressive Chantilly château dates back to the 16th century and its estate includes a beautiful, large park with gardens designed by Andre Le Nôtre. The discovery of the rich history of the domaine and of another of Chantilly’s claim to fame, its whipped cream, (http://www.thegoodlifefrance.com/chantilly-cream/) made up for the rather cloudy skies and cool temperatures!

LESTOILE_1592-1594 084Chantilly1 Chantilly2

A taste of Epoisses anyone?

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

epoisse.1251621398Students, staff and faculty gathered last week for the traditional wine and cheese tasting at the Madeleine Center.  The more adventurous tried the lesser known “stinkier” cheeses such as Epoisses (from the Alsace region) and Munster (from Burgandy), others stayed with tried and true favorites such as Comté (Franche-Comté) and Sainte-Maure de Touraine (Centre-Val de Loire).  Chloé_Stéphanie Gabriellle_Claire la photo de groupe Laura Ebob Nayla and co 1 Xavier et Aaron 1 Nayla Alexia J 2

Poetry Reading from “Please Do Not Remove: A Collection Celebrating Vermont Literature and Libraries”

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Please-Do-Not-Remove_cover-front-finalWe are pleased to present, along with the New England Review as part of their VT Reading Series, a reading from Please Do Not Remove: A Collection Celebrating Vermont Literature and Libraries. This special event will take place in the Davis Family Library Special Collections and Archives Room 101, at 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 10. The book’s editor, Angela Palm, and three contributors—David Dillon, Karin Gottshall, and Gary Margolis—will read from and discuss selections from the anthology. A reception will follow, and copies of the book will be given as a door prize. Free.

Please Do Not Remove (Wind Ridge Books, 2014) is an anthology of twenty works of prose and poetry by writers who represent Vermont’s rich literary tradition. Each piece in the book is inspired by an old library check-out card and incorporates libraries in some way. Corresponding color photographs of the cards, taken by Nick Adams, accompany each work. Ten percent of the book’s net proceeds will be donated to the Vermont Library Association for as long as the publication is in print.

David Dillon is a poet who lives and writes in Vermont’s iconic Northeast Kingdom town of East Albany. His poem “Northeast Kingdom Wind Song” recently was selected as the winner of the Vermont Broadside Poetry Competition. He was born in Vermont and worked as a journalist in New York, Pittsburgh, and Washington, D.C., before returning home. His most recent book is From the Porch.

Karin Gottshall is the author of Crocus, winner of the Poets Out Loud Prize, and several independent press chapbooks. Her new collection, The River Won’t Hold You, won the Ohio State University Press/The Journal Prize. Her poems have appeared in Crazyhorse, FIELD, The Gettysburg Review, New England Review, and many other journals. She teaches at Middlebury College.

Gary Margolis, PhD, is Emeritus Executive Director of College Mental Health Services and Associate Professor of English and American Literatures (part-time) at Middlebury College. His third book, Fire in the Orchard, was nominated for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. His poem “The Interview” was featured on National Public Radio’s “The Story” and Boston’s ABC Channel 5 interviewed him on the Middlebury campus reading his poem, “Winning the Lunar Eclipse,” after the 2004 World Series.

Angela Palm is the editor of Please Do Not Remove. Her essay collection, Riverine, is forthcoming from Graywolf Press in 2016 and is the recipient of the 2014 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize. She is a contributor at BookTrib and owns Ink & Lead Literary Services. She lives in Burlington, Vermont

For more on the New England Review and the NER VT Reading Series see http://www.nereview.com/ner-vt-reading-series/

“Joseph Battell: A Centennial Appreciation,” a talk by David Haward Bain, Monday, February 23rd

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Joe Battell, ca. 1860 -HSM, Stewart Papers, vol. 9

February 23, 2015 is the centennial of Joseph Battell’s death. Bread Loaf land baron (in his day the largest private landowner in Vermont), environmentalist, crusading newspaperman, Middlebury College alum (Class of 1860), trustee, philanthropist, novelist.

David Haward Bain presents an illustrated “magic lantern” talk on Joseph Battell’s life and works.

When: February 23, 2015, 4:30pm

Where: Abernethy Reading Room, The Axinn Center at Starr Library, Middlebury College

Refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by Middlebury College Special Collections & Archives, the Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest, the Environmental Studies Program, Middlebury History Department, and the Stewart-Swift Research Center, Henry Sheldon Museum.

David Haward Bain has taught creative writing and literature at Middlebury College for 28 years, and has been affiliated with the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference for 35 years since his first-book fellowship in 1980. His books include Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental Railroad, Bitter Waters: America’s Forgotten Naval Mission to the Dead SeaThe Old Iron Road: An Epic of Rails, Roads, and the Urge to Go West, and Sitting in Darkness: Americans in the Philippines, as well as The College on the Hill: A Browser’s History for the Bicentennial of Middlebury College and Whose Woods These Are: A History of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, 1926-1992.

Photo credit: Joseph Battell circa 1860. Courtesy of the Henry Sheldon Museum, Stewart-Swift Research Center