Tag Archives: ebooks

EBL Ebook Program Suspended Until July 1

You may know that Middlebury uses what’s called a “purchase on demand” model for its largest collection of electronic books, EBL (Electronic Book Library). Under this model, we place the catalog records in Midcat but don’t pay anything for the ebook unless and until it’s actually used. Then, we pay a fraction of the list price for each of the first four uses, and on the fifth request, the title is automatically purchased. We have set up seamless access so there’s no delay when you want to use a title, but the library is billed for all uses longer than five minutes, downloads, copies, or printing. There’s a lot more to how the program works, but that’s the broad outline.

Unfortunately, the library has reached the end of its funding for this fiscal year, so we have had to suspend access to the resource until July 1. This is definitely a temporary suspension, and EBL will be back on July 1, along with any titles you may have used but can no longer reach. We’re very sorry for the inconvenience and hope it doesn’t put a serious crimp in your work. Please feel free to contact Douglas Black, Head of Collections Management, for more information.

Looking for an Ebook You Once Saw Here?

Has an ebook you’ve previously used disappeared from our catalog? Never fear! We’ve had to make some cutbacks at the end of the fiscal year (lots and lots of requests for new material this year), but if you need to regain access to something that no longer appears, we may be able to get you back in. Just email us the title at researchdesk@middlebury.edu, and if it’s still available to us, we’ll get you back up and running with it.

Has an ebook gone missing?

Noticed that an ebook you’ve previously seen no longer appears available? There are several possible reasons, but the most likely one right now is that it was removed from our collection because of its cost. The Library has many sources for ebooks, and the largest one is a company called Ebook Library (EBL). We have some 200,000 EBL records in our catalog, of which we own only .6%. The rest are there for access as needed, and we don’t pay for them until they’re actually used. This is a recently developed program called Demand-Driven Acquisitions (DDA). A vastly oversimplified description is that for the first four uses, the library pays a percentage of the full purchase price, and the fifth use triggers an automatic purchase. DDA lets us offer a tremendous range of ebooks at a small fraction of the full purchase price. Over the last four years, we’ve paid less than $500,000 for access to more than $8 million worth of books.

However, in the last two years, many publishers have decided they weren’t making enough money, so they dramatically hiked their fees for those first four uses, which has sent our library’s costs skyrocketing. We’ve shifted some funds from print purchasing to cover the additional ebook costs, but the only way to moderate expenditures for the longer term is to remove the most expensive titles, along with titles from the most expensive publishers.

What to do? If you’re not finding something you’d previously seen, or if you come across a catalog link that doesn’t work (removing the catalog records tends to lag behind the actual ebook access), email us right away, and we might be able to get it back. If we can’t, we’ll work on finding another way to lay hands on the material for you.

The slow rise of ebooks (by the numbers)

The Library took note in May 2011 when Amazon.com announced that its customers were purchasing “more Kindle books than all print books – hardcover and paperback – combined.” Though we’re certainly not yet debating the idea of a bookless library at Middlebury, some number crunching over a 14 month time period seems to show that Middlebury faculty, students, and librarians are beginning to favor ebooks over print too:

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A 14 Month Snapshot of Library Requests (Sept. 1, 2011-Nov. 1, 2012)

1,339 faculty, students, & librarians requested books

Overall 35% preferred a print book

Overall 65% preferred an ebook

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Of the 211 students requests 45% preferred a print book and 55% preferred ebooks

Of the 432 librarian requests 33% preferred a print book and 67% preferred ebooks 

Out of 696 faculty requests 34% preferred a print book and 66% preferred ebooks

Ebooks for Kindle Fire, Android, iOS

New versions of OverDrive app for Android and iOS (iPhone/ iPad/ iPod touch).

What’s Overdrive? It’s Middlebury’s ebook and audiobook collection of prize-winning fiction, non-fiction, and popular reading…(go/Overdrive).
If you already have the app installed, you’ll see an “update” prompt the next time you open it. Otherwise, download the updated apps here:

New Library acquisitions for the Sciences

Annual Reviews
Access to 37 Annual Reviews volumes within the biomedical, life, physical, and social sciences. From its inception in 1932 to the current year.

Birds of North America Online
From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, BNA Online provides life histories for each of the 716+ species of birds breeding in the USA (including Hawaii) and Canada along with image and video galleries showing plumages, behaviors, habitat, nests and eggs, and recordings of songs and calls.

Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (2006 – current)
An interdisciplinary journal providing a definitive source of research methods in cell, developmental and molecular biology, genetics, bioinformatics, protein science, computational biology, immunology, neuroscience and imaging.

Fertility and Sterility (1997 – current)
Articles in clinical and laboratory research relevant to reproductive endocrinology, urology, andrology, physiology, immunology, genetics, contraception, and menopause.

JSTOR Life Sciences Collection (go/jstor)
Four hundred years (1665-2007) of published journals of science history and research in the sciences including aquatic science, botany, developmental & cell biology, ecology, paleontology, zoology, medicine, nursing, epidemiology, and public health.

SpringerLink (go/springer)
Over 2,000 journals and 53,000 ebooks in the fields of science, technology, and medicine.

 

Visit our New & Trial Resources page to find these and other newly added items. 

Download library ebooks to the Kindle Fire

In addition to the iPad, iPhone, Android devices, and Nook, tens of thousands of our ebooks can be downloaded directly to the Kindle Fire with the free Bluefire app.

Here are the steps:

  1. With the Bluefire app on your Kindle Fire, access our ebooks at go/ebooks.
  2. If you don’t have the Blurefire app installed, our ebook site automatically links to Bluefire instructions for download.
  3. Once the Bluefire app is installed and authorized, click ‘download’ and your ebook will download and open.
  4. You can also transfer downloaded content from your PC or Mac to your Kindle with Adobe Digital Editions.
  5. We’ve got step-by-step directions on downloading ebooks to your desktop here. Or, if you’d rather not download, you can read ebooks online through the Kindle browser.

Enjoy, and look out for LIS’s very own Kindle Fires, available at a library circulation desk near you. (Sometime this summer we hope.)