Tag Archives: arts

Are you interested in the Performing Arts Industry?

There are several Midd alums currently working in the performing arts industry. I encourage you to contact them to learn how to succeed in this industry.

Search for them via Middnet and/or LinkedIn. Below you will find a short list where alumni have worked or interned in the past.

Cameron McKinney/Kizuna Dance, Gibney Dance, Parsons Dance Company, Issue Project Room, A Dance Vision by Nicole, Megan Bascom and Dancers, Dixon Place, Jennifer Muller/The Works, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, Sable Arts Projects, Purpose Productions, Atlantic Theater Company, Telsey and Company, National Artists Management Company (NAMCO), bloc Agency, Stage Directors and Choreographers Society (SDC), Icarus Theatre Collective, The Actors Theatre Workshop, Wise Fish Theatre Collective, The Barrow Group Theatre Company, Pittsburgh Public Theatre, Middlebury- Town Hall Theatre, Lincoln Center, Alvin Aliley American Dance Theatre, Mark Morris Dance Center, Writers Theatre of NJ, RCI Theatricals, Williamstown Theatre Festival, New York Theatre Workshop, StageAgent, Backstage, Via Brooklyn, NY- The Public Theatre, Women’s Project Theatre, The Playwrights Realm, Ars Nova, Atlantic Theatre Company, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, The Stella Adler Studio of Acting, The Lee Stratsberg Theatre and Film Institute, Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre, Helluva Theatre Company, Seattle Repertory Theatre, Project Y Theatre Company, The Kennedy Center for Performing ARts, Hartford Stage, Arena Stage, Shakespeare Theatre Company, The Pearl Theatre Company, Weston Playhouse Theatre, Kitchen Theater Company, The Working Theater, American Conservatory Theater, Eugene O’Neil Theater Center, and Magic Theatre San Francisco

 As a student, you could continue to develop your skills and experience on campus. If you would like to discuss your interest in the performing arts industry, please schedule an appointment with me in handshake!

12 Video Animation Tips from the Industry Experts

Moovly has put together a list of great and unique animation tips that you may have overlooked or never really come across. What makes these tips more valuable is that they have originated from some of the industry’s finest and experienced animators. Click here to read the article.

C3- Summer Research Opp in the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences and Mathematics

As you think about summer plans, you may want to take a look at the C3 (Creating Connections Consortium) summer research opportunities at the University of California, Berkeley and Columbia University. Three current Middlebury students have participated in the program. Application deadline is February 1, 2015. Who can apply? The program invites applications from current […]

Wired for Creativity

Thursday September 27th marked the opening of this year’s Clifford Symposium, celebrating “Creativity and Collaboration.” With more than 30 events across multiple academic and artistic disciplines, the weekend offered everything from music and dance performances to panels on peacekeeping and entrepreneurship.

The annual occasion, which falls near the start of each academic year, is named for Nicholas R. Clifford, who taught history at the College from 1966 to 1993 and is a champion of critical inquiry. This year’s symposium was hosted by the Kevin P. Mahaney ’84 Center for the Arts in honor of its 20th anniversary.

Middmag caught the kick-off energy of the evening’s keynote speaker, Julie Burstein, and opening wire-walking event with the following video Dispatch:


More Clifford Symposium coverage:

 


TedxMonterey

The Monterey Institute of International Studies is hosting a Tedx event.  TED refers to the wildly successful annual conferences that bring together people from technology, entertainment and design to give short talks about their lives.  Tedx events are community organized programs that following a similar format to the TED conferences.

TedxMonterey is happening on April 15 and will be livestreamed and live-interpreted to the web.   Speakers will include dancers (including Middelbury’s Andrea Olsen), drummers, environmentalists, researchers, entrepreneurs and artists.

Not Exactly Administrative News: Ten Great Albums of 2010

The following post is not even close to an administrative update, but for the past couple of years Matt Jennings and I have blogged about our favorite albums of the year (for instance, see this and this).   Because we do a radio show on WRMC every Friday afternoon, we get to pretend to be authorities on pop music.  And we have fun.

We ‘re doing it again this year, and share the following recommendations in the spirit of the holiday season.   We invite readers to post their recommendations as well.  The more, the better . . .

Matt’s Choices

Astute listeners of 68 Degrees and Holding will not find my list particularly surprising (nor will they be surprised by what will surely be a snarky response from my friend and co-DJ, the author of this blog).

Some really good music was produced this year, but to my admittedly quirky ear, this five albums represent the best of the best:

  • Mumford & Sons, “Sigh No More”

A brilliant debut from this West London quartet. From Marcus Mumford’s passionate vocals to Winston Marshall’s banjo pickin’ (yes, Spears, banjo pickin’!) to Ted Dwayne’s mastery of the stand-up bass, this band manages to sound both refreshingly original yet appropriately reflective of their musical roots in bluegrass, folk, and eclectic rock.

  • The National, “High Violet”

I enjoyed “Boxer” so much that I was both eager and anxious about this album’s release. Eager because “Boxer” just left me wanting more, more, more and anxious because I fretted that “Boxer” was so good that anything that followed would be a letdown. Well, I wasn’t disappointed.

  • Frightened Rabbit, “The Winter of Mixed Drinks” [Insert Spears eye roll here]

I’m well aware of the heresy of comparing the Irish to the Scottish, but this band reminds me of the Pogues–without Shane MacGowans drunken (and ultimately destructive) antics. “The Winter of Mixed Drinks” is the perfect follow up to 2007′s “The Midnight Organ Fight”; it’s fun, catchy, and addictive.

  • LCD Soundsystem, “This is Happening”

A trendy pick, I know, but to ignore James Murphy’s latest work would be a flagrant omission, especially if we were to look back on this list in a year’s, two years’, ten years’ time. Aggressively original and fascinating to listen to.

  • Treme Soundtrack

From the traditional (Dr. John, Rebirth Brass Band, Trombone Shorty, Kermit Ruffin) to the original (Steve Earle’s “This City, which was written for the show) to the hilarious (“Shame, Shame, Shame” by Steve Zahn and friends) this soundtrack from the HBO original series is a must have, both for fans of the show and folks who love great, authentic music.

Tim’s Choices

No snarkiness here.  All sweetness and light!

  • Cee Lo Green, “Lady Killer”

Cee Lo Green has a storied career in the hip-hop world, but this is a full-out R & B record that traditionalists will love.  It includes the infectious and infamous “F– You,” which can be seen and and heard in all its glory on YouTube.  But there is nothing gimmicky about this album.  Fans of Michael Jackson, Al Green, or Beyoncé should take note.

  • Janelle Monáe, “The ArchAndroid”

At times, this sounds like another entry in the R & B sphere, but the album is so diverse and international in its offerings that it really can’t be categorized (though I don’t think it includes any banjo).  Style-wise (check out her videos), Monáe gestures to 1920s (the album cover art is apparently inspired by Fritz Lang’s 1927 film, Metropolis), but her genre-mashing encompasses hip-hop, jazz, Afro-punk—you name it.  A virtuoso performance, and Monáe, who is from Kansas City, is only 25.

  • Bruce Springsteen, “The Promise”

The outtakes from Springsteen’s 1978 album, “Darkness on the Edge of Town,” the songs here will please long-time fans of the Boss.  This album is not entirely new, since Springsteen has been performing these songs for decades and they’ve appeared on bootlegs.  But it is great to have them all in one place.   And it’s also worth listening to these songs along with “Darkness” so you can see what sort of sound and statement he was going for on the original album, which is more stripped down than “The Promise.”

  • Robyn, “Body Talk, Pt 1″

The Swedish techno-pop star hits the sweet spot with songs about dancehall love, gender bending, and cyber culture.  She keeps it light, witty, and danceable—not so heavy as Lady Gaga.   And, believe it or not, she will be performing at Higher Ground in later January.  I already have my tickets.

  • Jamey Johnson, “The Guitar Song”

This is country music about the useful themes: heartbreak, crummy jobs, alcoholism, and the little pleasures of everyday life.  Johnson is a compelling storyteller, and his Alabama-tinged bass voice gives the lyrics a sense of gravitas and depth.  I don’t listen to a lot of country music, but I keep returning to this album, trying to understand why I like it so much.  There are also just enough guitar riffs here to satisfy rock fans.