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Friday Links – May 2, 2014

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

At Middlebury, we’ve been using Summon as the discovery layer for our library collections for the last several years.  The recent article from the Chronicle of Higher Education about discovery tools is an interesting read:

As Researchers Turn to Google, Libraries Navigate the Messy World of Discovery Tools

Many professors and students gravitate to Google as a gateway to research. Libraries want to offer them a comparably simple and broad experience for searching academic content. As a result, a major change is under way in how libraries organize information. Instead of bewildering users with a bevy of specialized databases—books here, articles there—many libraries are bulldozing their digital silos. They now offer one-stop search boxes that comb entire collections, Google style.

That’s the ideal, anyway. The reality is turning out to be messier.

Read the rest of the article here

Ideal lengths of tweets, facebook updates, blog posts, etc. (Hint: facebook updates – really, really short)

Dartmouth Pops the Champagne as Basic Programming Language Turns 50 – Basic, the programming language that revolutionized computing by making it accessible to people beyond the worlds of science and engineering, turns 50 this week, and it’s getting a birthday party.

How the 5 hottest tech jobs are changing IT – The IT industry is shifting. Here are five jobs coming to the forefront and how they are transforming the IT department.

How to Delete Yourself from the Internet – You can make yourself “disappear” from the Internet. But be forewarned: Most of the following tactics are irreversible.

Flipped learning skepticism: Is flipped learning just self-teaching?

Research Libraries, Publishers Stake Out Positions on International ILL

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

A battle is brewing between research libraries and an association of academic publishers over the right to engage in international interlibrary loans and document delivery, both well-established library practices.

Read the article. >>>