Learn about Joshua Allen’s workshop, “Organizing at the Intersection of Black Lives Matter & Gender Justice”

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On November 19th, Joshua Allen presented their workshop entitled “Organizing at the Intersection of Black Lives Matter & Gender Justice” in the Warner Hemicycle. This workshop was sponsored in part by a Community Engagement Mini-Grant. The workshop was also attended by a number of community partners, including the Department of Residence Life at UVM, a staff member at Safe Space, and representatives of the Burlington-based Pride Center Vermont.
            Joshua discussed overlapping or intersecting social identities and oppressions. In this case, they detailed the intersection of the Black Lives Matter movement with violence against women, femmes, and girls. Joshua challenged participants to engage in these movements, providing students, faculty, and community members with tools to create inclusive organizing spaces and engage with these issues more effectively. Joshua didn’t hesitate to ask difficult questions about life at Middlebury, including the language that we use, the identities that we inhabit, and what solidarity means in our community.
            Middlebury’s Queer Studies House initiated this workshop. Noting the increased institutional focus on intersectional identities, including the upcoming visit of scholar Kimberle Crenshaw, student organizers sought to create a space to resist cis-normativity and celebrate trans* leadership. Moreover, given last year’s die-ins and the alternative spring break trip to Montgomery, Alabama, student organizers sought to build upon much of the conversations that had already begun at Middlebury.


iPad Pro has arrived!

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College Community Chorus Thanksgiving concert

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On Sunday afternoon, November 22, one hundred singers — including Middlebury College students from across the globe and residents from nearly every town in Addison County —  will take their places in the choir pews inside Mead Chapel as the Middlebury College Community Chorus presents its annual Thanksgiving concert. This free, hour-long performance begins at 3:00 p.m. and is open to all.

Middlebury College Community Chorus

photo: Miranda de Beer

The program includes a mix of exciting classical choruses alongside newer works. The choir will offer the magnificent first movement of J. S. Bach’s Magnificat; Felix Mendelssohn’s setting of the Thanksgiving chorale Now Thank We All our God; and the final choruses from G. F. Handel’s Messiah with the thrilling counterpoint of voices singing Blessing and Honor… Amen! Works by contemporary American composer-conductors include an exciting setting of a thanksgiving psalm, Jubilate Deo (Make a joyful noise unto God) by David N. Childs, and the beautiful Pilgrims’ Hymn by Stephen Paulus. The choir presents Soulspeak by Z. Randall Stroope, a brand new song with an inspiring text from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s Ulysses. Also slated is Jeffery Ames’s Let Everything that Hath Breath, an uplifting gospel song with its driving rhythm, as well as a beautiful new arrangement by Craig Courtney of Let There Be Peace on Earth.

Conductor Jeff Rehbach notes that the Chorus is privileged this season to perform two works by members of our local communities. Sally Hoyler, well-known in the community as Ripton town clerk and a long-time member of the Chorus, succumbed to cancer in early 2015. In her memory, the chorus will sing a beautiful, flowing song that she composed several years ago that begins with the lyrical text “Ocean, ocean sing to me the silent music of the soul.” The choir will also premiere a brand-new work, A Blessing for Dear Friends, written by Nathan Wallace-Gusakov. Nate grew up in Bristol and now lives with his family in Lincoln and appears frequently playing banjo with music groups in the area. His composition offers hope for peace and love, light to guide the way, and concludes “may you come home to love” – a fitting sentiment for this Thanksgiving program.

Middlebury College Community Chorus

photo: Miranda de Beer

Members of the College Community chorus travel for weekly rehearsals from throughout the region, including Cornwall, Weybridge, Middlebury, Ripton, Goshen, Bristol, Monkton, New Haven, Waltham, Vergennes, Ferrisburgh, Charlotte, East Middlebury, Salisbury, Leicester, Brandon, Rutland, Orwell, Shoreham, Addison, Port Henry and Moriah. College students hail from Vermont, Maine, New York, Massachusetts, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Illinois, Hong Kong and Kenya. Jeff Rehbach is in his sixteenth season as conductor of the College Community Chorus, and Timothy Guiles serves as the ensemble’s remarkable accompanist. The group is open without audition to all singers who delight in participating in this 150-year-old community tradition, hosted by Middlebury College.
For up-to-date information, check on the web at http://go.middlebury.edu/communitychorus or contact director Jeff Rehbach at 989-7355.


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Please read the changes below to the time entry/approvals deadline and pay dates for BW24 (pay date 11/25/15).

The time entry deadline is 4 days earlier for this pay period.

These changes are required to accommodate for the Thanksgiving holiday and are critical to the early payroll processing.

Pay period BW24 (11/09/15 – 11/22/15)

  • Deadline for SUBMITTING AND APPROVING TIME – FRIDAY, 11/20/15 10:00am
  • Paychecks and direct deposits issued and dated – Wednesday, 11/25/15


Please inform all your staff of these changes

Payroll/Human Resources

The SpeedGrader

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The SpeedGrader in Canvas allows an instructor to provide feedback to a student for assignments, quizzes and discussion posts without leaving a browser. Feedback can be given in the form of annotations, attachements or in-browser recorded audio. There is also a SpeedGrader mobile app that can be run from an iPad. For more on the...

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Road Taken: Awakening

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Somewhere along the way modern America lost its sense of scale. The coasts seem to have grown more proximate. Our neighbors have inched closer. Everyone appears to know everything about everybody. Maybe the Internet is to blame, or the airplane, or even the car. But no one seems to notice. At least I didn’t—not until last summer, when a friend and I embarked on an unorthodox trip from Buffalo to New York City.

The plan was to paddle the decade-old, 17-foot, obnoxiously red, recreational Old Town canoe my father had given my mother for their 19th anniversary. We were going to go along the Erie Canal and down the Hudson River. By car Buffalo to New York is seven hours and a tank and a half of gas. By canoe, it’s three weeks and 20 cans of soup. Setting out, we weren’t sure if we would encounter a small portion of a big world or a big portion of a small one.

We felt every mile. The canal has a 10-mile-per-hour speed limit—a restriction I’d always thought laughingly slow until I considered it from the stern of a canoe. Paddling as hard as we could—dip, swing, dip, swing, dip, swing, j-stroke—we’d hit about 5 mph tops. But after 20 minutes, even that was out of reach.

I was surprised our slow progress wasn’t demoralizing. Instead, as we slipped along past farmland that endlessly stretched from the water’s edge—past abandoned mills and factories, past dense tree cover—our journey’s slowness accentuated the distance we covered. There was something deeply satisfying about every day’s small progress. Thirty miles on the water contained more than 300 on the interstate.

There were pieces of the canal that I had crossed daily for a large part of my life—mundane trips in the car headed to school or the store—but from the water everything was different.

I barely recognized my own community. From the canoe I saw the backs of buildings or a random swing set, and my brain wouldn’t register these familiar landmarks from a different vantage point. And the canal itself was unfamiliar. What I had always assumed was a meandering vestigial feature of a less-refined era revealed its elegance in gentle curves and long straights that were far more direct than the ribbon of roads we passed under.

Leaving the canal behind, the Hudson brought further revelations. Every mile
possessed abundant detail—the smell of pine needles, the hum of the freeway that was almost always in sight, bald eagles soaring overhead, aquatic life just beneath the water’s surface.

And then there were revelatory moments: container ships on the Hudson sound like a cross between a jet engine and a dinosaur, and when I viewed them from the surface of the water, I found judging their distance or movement almost impossible. With their skyscraper stacks and mammoth hulls, these water-crawling beasts obscure both the shore and landmarks. For what seems like hours, they don’t appear to move. Until suddenly a ship rushes past, leaving a fury of displaced water in its wake.

And then those moments, too, passed.

When we reached the Inwood Canoe Club in Manhattan—19 days and 450 miles from where we’d begun—I was relieved, satisfied. Still, I couldn’t shake one feeling. With all of the new sensations I’d experienced, I started wondering what I’d missed while looking the other way—or not looking at all.

The world no longer seemed quite so small.

James Lynch ’16 interned with the magazine last summer and is continuing on as a contributing editor. An English major, he is writing his senior thesis on his canoe trip down the Hudson.

Free-form Art Play for Everyone

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Old Stone Mill Poster