Join Stu Fram ’13-High Meadows Fund Environmental Philanthropy Fellowship for Seniors Jan. 12th @ 7PM

Categories: Midd Blogosphere
Wondering what you’ll be doing after graduation?…Fret not—distract yourself —and come to this Monday’s information session on Jan. 12th in LaForce Hall Seminar Room at 7:00PM to hear first-hand from Middlebury alum, Stu Fram ’13, who is the current 2-year Fellow working on issues important to the sustainable development of Vermont’s future. THIS IS AN […]

The Week’s Headlines

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Here are the week’s headlines from the News Room:

Research Suggests Possible Black Hole Merger

Dispatch from France: Prof. Erik Bleich on Charlie Hebdo and French Muslims

College Awards Tenure to Three Faculty

Middlebury Launches New Brand Identity System

A Reporter Reflects on His Summer at the Middlebury Arabic School

Warhol Exhibition Opens at Art Museum

New York Times Columnist to Headline Martin Luther King Jr. Events

Why Didn’t Mario Run? That Was Always The Question

View past stories by visiting the News Room page.

Contemporary Issues in the Liberal Arts – Winter Term Series

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Lunch will be served at each event in the Center for Teaching, Learning & Research 12 – 1 pm. Please RSVP using the sign up form at least two days in advance of the event. Thank you.

Monday, January 12th 2015 11:00-12:00

Teaching with (and about) Digital Technologies

How can students engage critically with technology in the classroom? How can digital assignments further pedagogical goals? Join Jason Mittell (FMC), Carrie Anderson (HARC), and Alicia Peaker (DLA) for a discussion of these questions, and some practical examples of implementing digital technologies in the classroom.

Thursday January 15, 2015, 11:00 – 12:00

Guided Inquiry Learning

In this session, Assistant Professor Glen Ernstrom (BIOL, NSCI) will introduce and explore a student-centered pedagogical strategy that emphasizes deep thinking, deep learning, and the creative process.

Monday January 19, 2015, 11:00 – 12:00

Classroom Discussion Part II: Navigating Controversial Topics

When controversial or difficult topics become central parts of classroom conversations they are likely to engage student’s deeply held preconceptions and convictions and may arouse powerful emotional responses. These exchanges may become heated, but a thoughtful, well‐facilitated discussion can have many benefits as students get the opportunity to learn from their peers and explore new ways of understanding the world. Moreover, the encouragement of mutual respect during the course of disagreement can encourage students to feel more confident as they enter into difficult conversations in the future.

See our full schedule here: http://sites.middlebury.edu/ctlrprogramming/

 

Interested in the environment? Apply now to this summer internship opportunity with the Consortium for Energy and Efficiency!

Categories: Midd Blogosphere
The Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is seeking a motivated, organized individual to serve as an intern and support its Evaluation, Research, and Behavior (ER&B) Sector work, with a focus on behavior. The ERB sector supports CEE members and works with government and non-government agencies throughout the US and Canada to help improve evaluation methods […]

Friday links – January 9, 2015

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Libraries are in the technology industry, says Rick Anderson. “… When we talk publicly about technological change in libraries, it seems to me that it’s too often in one of two ways: either we’re patting ourselves on the back for being so ready to embrace it, or we’re talking about how a particular change is just a fad and really doesn’t really apply to us. But the information world has become, decisively and whether we like it or not, a technology industry. … Confusing the sacredness of ends with the sacredness of means is one symptom of a disease that could easily kill us. …”

Middlebury College Receives 2015 Community Engagement Reclassification by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

For several years the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has helped frame and articulate “best practices” in higher education/community collaboration and learning. In 2006 the Foundation offered the first elective “Community Engagement” classification. That year, Middlebury’s (then) Alliance for Civic Engagement (ACE) applied for and received recognition in the inaugural round on behalf of the College. This past year, in addition to new applications, colleges and universities that were recognized in either 2006 or 2008 needed to reapply in order to be approved for reclassification. On January 7, 2015 the Carnegie Foundation, in collaboration with the New England Research Center for higher Education (NERCHE), awarded Middlebury College and others distinction through the 2015 Carnegie Community Engagement Classification.

This designation recognizes excellent work by faculty, staff, and students from multiple areas across campus (e.g., academic departments in the Arts, Humanities, Languages, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and other interdisciplinary programs; collaboration with Monterey and Schools Abroad; and offices/programs such as Community Engagement, Privilege & Poverty, the Center for Social Entrepreneurship, MiddCORE, Programs on Creativity and Innovation in the Liberal Arts, FoodWorks, Athletics, the Center for Careers & Internships, the Scott Center, CTLR, Orientation, JusTalks, the Commons, and more)—along with dozens of collaborating community partners. Examples of community-connected teaching, learning, and research initiatives; faculty-advised and student-led projects; volunteer efforts; internships; off-campus federal work study commitments; grant opportunities; alternative break trips; and more—demonstrated our alignment with institutional mission and priorities, overall, and the College’s continued commitment to work with and strengthen communities through partnerships, near and far.

From the Carnegie Foundation:

“Your application documented excellent alignment among campus mission, culture, leadership, resources, and practices that support dynamic and noteworthy community engagement, and it responded to the classification framework with both descriptions and examples of exemplary institutionalized practices of community engagement.  The application also documented evidence of community engagement in a coherent and compelling response to the framework’s inquiry.

“Your campus is one of 361 institutions that now hold the Community Engagement Classification.  It is heartening to see this level of commitment and activity.  Clearly, higher education is making significant strides in finding ways to engage with and contribute to important community agendas.  There is much to celebrate.”

“The importance of this elective classification is borne out by the response of so many campuses that have demonstrated their deep engagement with local, regional, national, and global communities,” said John Saltmarsh, Director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education. “These are campuses that are improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in communities, and revitalizing their civic and academic missions.”

“This is the first time that there has been a re-classification process,” noted Amy Driscoll, Consulting Scholar for the Community Engagement Classification, “and we are seeing renewed institutional commitment, advanced curricular and assessment practices, and deeper community partnerships, all sustained through changes in campus leadership, and within the context of a devastating economic recession.”

Middlebury is one of 157 colleges and universities in the country to receive re-classification. This reclassification is valid until 2025.

“We applaud the Carnegie Foundation for recognizing the importance of setting high standards for valuable campus/community collaboration and articulating benchmarks to help guide those of us striving to pursue excellence in our work, while also drawing national attention and recognition,” comments Tiffany Nourse Sargent ’79, Director, Middlebury College Community Engagement. “One of the exciting points to underscore from this extensive self-study is the celebration that community engagement initiatives now generate from multiple points across campus, involving many more academic and co-curricular entities than was the case in 2006. While we in the Community Engagement office continue to serve as the ‘hub’ for campus community engagement initiatives, it is wonderful to see more and more positive connections campus-wide. To all who have contributed, thank you for your time, expertise, dedication, and good will as we work together to provide valuable and impactful learning experiences for our students and nurture strong and healthy communities.”

Peggy Nelson awarded supplemental NSF funding

Categories: Midd Blogosphere

Peggy Nelson (Sociology-Anthropology) has received an REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) Supplement to the National Science Foundation grant awarded last summer to Peggy and a collaborator from Wellesley, titled Social and Biogenetic Factors of New Forms of Families. This additional funding creates an unusual research training experience by covering  travel expenses and wages for a student to accompany Peggy and her collaborator to conduct interviews during Spring Break and after the semester ends.