Student Org Profile: DREAM

 

DREAM is a mentoring organization that pairs college students with youth from affordable housing neighborhoods. DREAM aims to empower children to lead healthy, productive lives through weekly gatherings with fun and rewarding activities.

During my first semester on campus, I was interested in community involvement and mentoring, and was lucky enough to find DREAM (Directing through Recreation, Education, Adventure, and Mentoring). DREAM is a group mentoring organization for kids living in affordable housing developments around Middlebury, and centers around weekly programming each Friday with activities such as tie-dye, sledding, science demos, field days, and more. As a part of DREAM, I’ve had the opportunity to enjoy the summer camp vibe of these fun Fridays, as well as the chance to develop long term mentoring relationships with kids of a variety of ages in the Middlebury community. Getting to know these kids has become a weekly treat, and watching them mature and grow over the past year and a half has been one of the most rewarding parts of my time at school.

-Sadie Dutton ’19.

March Library Newsletter

Don’t miss the March issue of Keywords: The Middlebury College Library Newsletter!

Keywords: The Middlebury College Library Newsletter

Read about how the library is planning for College-wide budget reductions, how you can dig through Freedom Of Information Act (FOIA) materials online, our battle to acquire a 1521 edition of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, new colleagues at the library, and more.

Many accounts require password reset due to recent phishing attack

Almost 100 people fell victim to a “phishing” email purporting to announce an “Important Meeting”. In order to protect the rest of the Middlebury account holders, the accounts which were compromised were disabled, and will need a password reset. If you have trouble logging in to your Middlebury account, it is likely that you are one of the victims of this attack. Please visit go.middlebury.edu/activate and reset your network password. This is an important warning to all that we should be extremely cautious about clicking on a link in an email. Although these phishing emails are well disguised, there are clues that they are not valid, so please think twice before clicking on any link in an email. More helpful hints on how to protect yourself can be found here:
http://www.middlebury.edu/offices/technology/infosec/education

From E4 Health: Managing Anxiety

Support when dark clouds come rolling in:
Managing Anxiety

Life can be stressful! Anxiety is a normal reaction to stress and can actually be beneficial in some situations. For some people, however, anxiety can become excessive. While many individuals suffering may realize their anxiety is too much, you may also have difficulty controlling it, and it may negatively affect your day-to-day living.    We encourage you to take advantage of the FREE supportive resources available to you and your family.  Our team is here to assist with any work, family or career issue that’s causing concern, stress, or anxiety.

  • Health and Wellness concerns
  • Depression
  • Grief and loss
  • Addiction and substance abuse
  • Relationship issues
  • Life transitions or challenges
  • Compassion fatigue
  • Legal and Financial anxiety or stress
  • Talking to children about stressful situations
  • Anything else that is weighing heavily on your mind.

Professional support is just a phone call away!

e4health administers the College’s EFAP program.  To access their comprehensive web site, with many tools and articles, go to the e4health web site.
Username:  middlebury college
Password:    guest
Or call them at: 800-828-6025
(phones are answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

March EFAP News: Resolving Differences

FREE WEBINAR:

Respecting Each Other at Work

Wednesday, March 22rd
12-1pm and 3-4pmEST
11-12pm and 2-3pmCST
10-11am and 1-2pmMST
9-10am and 12-1pmPST

No matter where we are on the org chart, we all deserve to be treated with dignity, respect, and kindness. During this webinar, participants will learn the root causes of offensive behaviors, create a list of rules to live by, and commit to working on one thing they can do to improve their relationships with colleagues. We will also look at how social media can affect workplace relationships.

REGISTER TODAY!  Space is limited.

Click on the time you would like to attend above. Or log on to www.HelloE4.com with your username and password.  Click on “UPCOMING WEBINARS” on the homepage and follow the easy instructions

Unable to make it to the scheduled webinars? 

We have them archived for your convenience. Log onto the website and click on E4 University at the bottom of the home page, then click on Webinars to search by webinar title.

 

Respecting and Resolving Differences

Conflict isn’t comfortable. However, when handled effectively, it can lead to positive change. You can make conflict more productive by reflecting on some important questions, such as: “Is my reaction proportional to the situation or might it be more about something else?” “Which part of this situation do I have the power to change?” “What would a positive outcome look like?”

Take assertive action. Assertiveness is very different than aggression. It involves expressing yourself clearly, directly, and respectfully, as well as practicing active listening and tempering your own reactions.

Identify any preconceived beliefs. It’s important to go in with an open mind—check yourself for any preconceived biases or explanations, and try to put them to the side so that you can really hear what the other person is saying and come to a resolution.

Create a safe atmosphere. Instead of personalizing or blaming, stick to addressing specific behaviors and how they impact you. Identify points of agreement and work from those first; then address the differences.

Remember your ABCDs. Agree to Brainstorm together and to Compromise, Clarify what the other person is saying, and Discuss mutually beneficial resolutions.

Attend the webinar. This month be sure to register and attend the webinar, “Respecting Each Other at Work.” Become more aware of how our behavior affects others and what we can do to make workplace interaction more positive. A full description and registration information is listed in the sidebar to the right. If you’re unable to attend at any of the times, log on to the website at a later time to view the archived presentation. 

PDF files of the monthly newsletter and posters will be available for download

on the 1st of the month by logging onto the website and clicking on

“Monthly Bulletins” on the home page.

e4health administers the College’s EFAP program.  To access their comprehensive web site, with many tools and articles, go to the e4health web site.
Username:  middlebury college
Password:    guest
Or call them at: 800-828-6025
(phones are answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

Research grant awarded to School in France student

 

Middlebury School in France student, Nick Henke, has been awarded a grant from the Rohatyn Center for Global Affairs.  He was awarded this grant to help him pursue and complete his research, studying “French novels by women in the postwar era and their relationship to Second Wave Feminism.”   Congratulations, Nick, and all the best with your research!

 

To learn more about this grant, click the link below:

Rohatyn Center for Global Affairs : Study Abroad Research Grants

 

 

 

Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait

" Photo Joshua Black Wilkins

Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait
Jenny Scheinman, violin

March 4, Saturday
8:00 PM, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Robison Hall

Acclaimed composer, singer, and violinist Jenny Scheinman invites us into the captivating visual world of Depression-era filmmaker H. Lee Waters. Scheinman and her musical sidemen, Robbie Fulks and Robbie Gjersoe, create a live soundtrack of new folksongs, fiddle music, and field sounds to accompany Waters’s fascinating footage, now masterfully reworked by director Finn Taylor. The result is a reflection on “the gaze” both then and now; the evolution of mill towns; and a striking commentary on race, class, and the American experience. “Scheinman [has] a distinctive vision of American music, suffused with plainspoken beauty and fortified all at once by country, gospel, and melting-pot folk, along with jazz and the blues”—New York Times. Post-performance Q&A with the artists. Sponsored by the Performing Arts SeriesDepartment of Film and Media Culture, and the Committee on the Arts. The program is approximately 70 minutes with no intermission. There will be a Q&A after the performance. Tickets: Public $20, College ID holders $15, Students $6.

Funded in part by the Expeditions program of the New England Foundation for the Arts, made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional support from the six New England state arts agencies.

LEARN MORE
Associated Events>> | Press Release>> | Video>> | Facebook Event Page>>

 

Associated events:

 

Glenn Andres: Middlebury as Mill Town

March 3, Friday
12:15 PM, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Dance Theatre

Professor Emeritus of the History of Art and Architecture Glenn Andres gives an illustrated lecture on Middlebury’s past as a center of mill industry. He will touch on the significance of the local textile and marble industries, their role in shaping the town, and the people whose lives were intertwined with them. Offered as partof the Fridays at the Museum series, and in conjunction with Saturday’s performance Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait. Free

Pictured: James Hope, Middlebury Falls, ca. 1850, collection of Henry Sheldon Museum

 

Gallery Talk: American Faces

March 4, Saturday
7:00 PM, Middlebury College Museum of Art

Middlebury College students give a brief introduction to the exhibition American Faces: A Cultural History of Portraiture and Identity in conjunction with Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait. The museum is open for pre-concert visitors from 6:00–8:00 PM. Free

American Flag of Faces Exhibit, Ellis Island, New York (detail), c. 1990–2011. Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

 

Additionally, Scheinman will visit Prof. Natasha Ngaiza’s Film & Media Culture class Sight & Sound I, and coach the independent study folk music duo of Milo Stanley ‘17.5, fiddle and Aidan O’Brien ’20, violin.

Photo by Erik Jacobs for NPR

 Video

Press Release

February 15, 2017

March 4 Concert Includes 1930s Documentary Footage of Mill Town Residents

Middlebury, VT— Acclaimed composer, singer, and violinist Jenny Scheinman invites us into the captivating visual world of Depression-era filmmaker H. Lee Waters in the multi-media performance Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait on Saturday, March 4 at the Mahaney Center for the Arts. Seasoned with bluegrass, county, and roots notes, this performance will take audiences on a journey back nearly 100 years into America’s industrial past.

Scheinman and her musical sidemen, Robbie Fulks and Robbie Gjersoe, have created a live soundtrack of new folksongs, fiddle music, and field sounds to accompany Waters’s fascinating footage, now masterfully reworked by director Finn Taylor. The result is a reflection on “the gaze” both then and now; the evolution of mill towns; and a striking commentary on race, class, and the American experience. Audiences can stay after the performance for a Q&A with the artists.

“Scheinman [has] a distinctive vision of American music, suffused with plainspoken beauty and fortified all at once by country, gospel, and melting-pot folk, along with jazz and the blues”—New York Times.

About the Performance

Scheinman developed this performance in collaboration with Duke Performances. She writes, “H. Lee Waters was a journeyman portrait photographer in Lexington, North Carolina, whose business fell on hard times during the Great Depression. He came up with another plan to make a living: make regular people into movie stars! He got hold of a movie camera and travelled to towns throughout the Piedmont region. He would film as many people as possible in public places, then return several weeks later to show the footage in the towns’ movie theaters…between 1936 and 1942 he worked tirelessly to create 118 movies, compiling one of the most comprehensive documents that we have of American life at that time.”

Scheinman began work on the project in 2009, writing over three hours of music for the project, and eventually narrowing her material down to one hour to match film director Finn Taylor’s carefully curated editing. These are America’s home movies. They contain a clue to our nature, an imprint of our ancestry. They were shot before Americans had sophisticated understanding of film, and capture truthfulness that one is hard-pressed to find in this day and age, now that we are immersed in a world of social media, video, and photography. These people can dance. Girls catapult each other off seesaws and teenage boys hang on each others’ arms. Toothless men play resonator guitars on street corners, and toddlers push strollers through empty fields. They remind us of our resilience, and of our immense capacity for joy even in the hardest of times.”

About the Musicians

Jenny Scheinman is a violinist, fiddler, singer, and composer originally from Northern California who has worked extensively with Bill Frisell, Bruce Cockburn, Ani DiFranco, Norah Jones, Madeleine Peyroux, Nels Cline, Rodney Crowell, Myra Melford, Robbie Fulks, and Mark Ribot, and has also garnered numerous high-profile arranging credits with Lucinda Williams, Simone Dinnerstein & Tift Merritt, Bono, Lou Reed, and Sean Lennon. She has taken the #1 Rising Star Violinist title in the Downbeat Magazine Critics’ Poll and has been listed as one of their Top Ten Overall Violinists for over a decade.

Robbie Fulks is a country singer, writer, and musician who has released twelve records on major and independent labels. Radio appearances include: NPR’s Fresh Air, Mountain Stage, and World Cafe; PRI’s A Prairie Home Companion; and WSM’s Grand Ole Opry. TV credits include Austin City Limits, the Today Show, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, Last Call With Carson Daly, and 30 Rock.

Robbie Gjersoe is a multi-instrumentalist, composer, songwriter, and occasional engineer and producer who has worked on a variety of musical projects wide-ranging in style and content for the last 30 years. He plays guitar, bottleneck slide, resonator, dobro, baritone ukulele, mandolin, nylon string, cavaquinho, viole, 12-string, lap steel, pedal steel, and bass.

Associated Events

Audience members can explore the themes of Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait further in two associated events: On Friday, March 3, Professor Emeritus of the History of Art and Architecture Glenn Andres will give an illustrated lecture on “Middlebury as Mill Town,” exploring Middlebury’s past as a center of mill industry. He will touch on the significance of the local textile and marble industries, their role in shaping the town, and the people whose lives were intertwined with them. Offered as part of the Fridays at the Museum Series, this talk will begin at 12:15 P.M. at the Mahaney Center for the Arts Dance Theatre, and will be free and open to the public.

Concertgoers can also enjoy the second associated event: a free, pre-concert gallery talk on Saturday, March 4 at 7:00 P.M. at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. Art history students will give a brief introduction to the exhibition American Faces: A Cultural History of Portraiture and Identity. The museum will be open for pre-concert visitors from 6:00–8:00 P.M.

Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait will be presented by the Performing Arts Series, the Department of Film and Media Culture, and the Committee on the Arts, and is funded in part by the Expeditions program of the New England Foundation for the Arts, made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional support from the six New England state arts agencies.

Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait will take place on Saturday, March 4, 2017, at 8:00 P.M. at the Kevin P. Mahaney ’84 Center for the Arts, in Robison Hall. The pre-concert gallery talk will begin at 7:00 P.M. at the Museum. The Mahaney Center is located on the campus of Middlebury College, at 72 Porter Field Road, just off Route 30 south/S. Main Street. Free parking is available curbside on Route 30 or in the Center for the Arts parking lot, in rows marked faculty/staff/visitors. Tickets are $20 for the general public; $15 for Middlebury College faculty, staff, alumni, emeriti, and other ID card holders; and $6 for Middlebury College students. For more information, or to purchase tickets, call (802) 443-MIDD (6433) or go to http://www.middlebury.edu/arts.

—END—

Press Release Photos by Joshua Black Wilkins