Category Archives: Midd Blogosphere

CCI’s Summer Internship Funding Applications Now Open!

CCI has $1000 and $3000 grants available for students with unpaid summer internships!  
Funding Application Deadline: April 13.

Instructions, forms, and FAQs available at go/summerfunding.

Before applying for funding:
*Find and accept an internship between now and April 13.
*Get your resume approved by a Peer Career Advisor. Don’t wait; visit Quick Questions for resume approval.** (Juniors studying abroad, contact Cheryl Whitney Lower.)
*Meet with a CCI advisor to discuss your plans. Appointments are required for First-Year Explore applicants and strongly encouraged for all other applicants.
*Complete an application in Handshake and upload 4 required documents: essay, budget, funding agreement, and  CCI-approved resume.

All funding applications will be reviewed after April 13. Grant notifications will be emailed on May 1.

Need help with your internship search?
There are over 3000 paid and unpaid internship on Handshake!
Also see CCI’s Top 10 Tips for Finding an Internship, visit
Quick Questions, or make an appointment with a CCI advisor.

CCI can’t wait to hear about your summer plans!

**Added bonus! Complete your Handshake profile and get your resume approved between now and March 24 and you’ll be entered into a competition for a $500 flight voucher.

Winter Carnival 2020 Ice Show, Feb. 29 and Mar. 1

The Ice Show features skaters of all ages and abilities, including lots of local kids, in a fun event filled with music and costumes.  The theme this year is “Midd Seasons.”  Cheer on the beginners and be dazzled by competitive skaters.   Come and enjoy the show!  Tickets are $6.00 (general admission), available at the door or in advance at the College box office.  SHOWTIMES: Sat 2/29 either 5:30 or 7:00 PM (check box office web site for updates) and Sun 3/1 at 2:00 PM.

Concessions will be available.  Kenyon Arena is fully accessible.  The show is run by the Middlebury College Figure Skating Club, a non-competitive figure skating program, with participation open to kids from the local community. 

Investing: Getting Started

Investing: Getting Started

Investing: Getting Started | March 10, 2020 | 9:00 AM (PST) & 12:00 PM (PST) |  Register Here.

Get ready for several compelling reasons why you need investing to achieve long-term goals. Then build your knowledge base as we define stocks, bonds, mutual funds and other investment options. We’ll also review how you would go about investing in each of those options. We’ll conclude with an overview of risk and return, as well as the fees associated with different types of investments, so you can feel more confident about adding investing to your financial action plan.

Note:  If you register and cannot attend, a recording of the webinar, along with a copy of the session presentation and handouts, will automatically be sent within 24 hours.

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You work hard for your money, but is your money working hard for you?

When it comes to our finances, we always wonder if we are making the right moves, and searching for answers can feel overwhelming.

Middlebury College provides all employees access to financial well-being thru My Secure Advantage (MSA).

MSA helps you make the most of your hard earned dollars!  When it comes to living a financially stress-free life, every decision you make adds up.  Through MSA, employees and their covered dependents can work with a personal Money Coach and utilize website services to make financial stress a thing of the past.

What’s Included

  • 90 days (per calendar year) of personalized money coaching with a personal, confidential, unbiased, and guilt free Money Coach.  Coaches don’t sell products or services: their only job is to provide expert guidance and improve your financial life.
  • Guidance on financial topics, goals, challenges, or questions.  Whether you’re getting by, digging out, or saving big, connecting with a Money Coach to discuss options, identify issues, and build out a plan can only help.

Work with MSA to tackle questions like “Should I be saving more or paying down debt?” “When will I be able to retire, and how much do I need?” “What type of portfolio is best for me?” “How do I balance enjoying life now with saving for the future?” and more.

  • Online tools include videos, calculators, articles, and budgeting software to help you stress less and save more.

Questions?  Learn more about MSA here. To get started, sign up, and schedule your first appointment with a Money Coach call 888-724-2326.

Register for the 4th annual Summit for Women in STEM

Belong. Connect. Create. Pass it on.

Saturday, April 4, 2020
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Where
Mars Center for Science & Technology
Fillmore Drive, Norton, MA, 02766

Wheaton’s Fourth Annual Summit for Women in STEM brings together a powerhouse network of industry leaders, researchers, and academics with undergraduate students who represent the next generation of innovators. At a time when women represent only 24% of professionals in all STEM fields, the Summit will open new worlds to aspiring young female scientists. By connected industry leaders with up-and-coming talent, the full-day meeting creates connections, forges new relationships, builds knowledge, and matches students with inspiring role models.

Undergraduate students are encouraged to give a talk. Registration is free and will remain open until full.

My MAlt Spring Break: Intersections of Faith and Climate Action

I spent my February break this year a little differently. I went back to Los Angeles, the place I have been calling home for the past 11 years, with nine other Middleury students. At 6:00 p.m. on a Saturday our plane finally landed in LAX, and I felt our group’s collective excitement and eagerness to learn about the intersectionality between climate change and religion and what roles we can play in helping mitigate this global crisis.  Although it is true that our trip was not the most physically demanding–we may have gone to the beach this week more than I ever have in one summer–I believe that it was one of my most intellectually and emotionally engaging experiences at Middlebury College. 

MAlt LA 2020 Participants in Long Beach, California for the beach clean-up with Algalita Marine Research and Education, a non-profit organization. Participants from left to right: Chima Dimgba ’21, Julia McClaine ’22, Rachel Jeong ’22, Nhi Do ’22, Isabella Primavera 21.5, Soyibou Sylla ’20, Bo Liu ’23, Anna Cox ’21, Bayu Ahmad ’21, Huiming (Sam) Liang ’22.

On our first full day, we visited the Metropolitan Church of Christ, a church centered on Creation. The whole community welcomed all of us with open arms, reflecting the core of their sermon that day: we humans are “the salt of the earth.” They shared the message that humans are one of earth’s most valuable resources and we have a duty to be kind to each other. This kindness must also extend towards all of God’s creation. We have a duty to protect and nurture the earth and everything that resides in it because we are simply sharing the earth with other living beings. Theirs was a call for responsibility. Although this was a clear articulation of the connection between climate change in religion, the most powerful experience I had in this church was more personal.

A banner hangs outside the Metropolitan Church of Christ. The church’s members are known as the “Queer and Quirky of Cahuenga Street” as they practice love for everyone, regardless of sexual orientation, race, and other social signifiers.

They did the Holy Communion a little differently from other more traditional churches. We were invited to join if we desired. I took the “body of Christ” with my own hands from a tray and dipped it in the chalice filled with the “blood of Christ.” After eating this, the deacon took my hands and touched our foreheads together in a very personal prayer. My eyes started to water as her words touched my heart. She said: “Blessed be are those who are young. For they really are the hope of the future.” At that moment, I realized that the older generation places so much faith in us to do better and to take better care of our shared world.

The most physically demanding–and emotionally exhausting–day that we had came on the third day of our trip. Half of the group, including myself, worked from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Hippie Kitchen situated in the middle of Downtown Los Angeles’ notorious Skid Row. This neighborhood, called “Hell on Earth” by some, creates a stark contrast from the bustling and wealthy area of Downtown Los Angeles as you see streets upon streets filled with tents, shopping carts, trash, and items usually found inside a house. When you leave this neighborhood, you can immediately see a completely different set-up of the city: high-rise buildings, fancy restaurants, expensive apartments. As a native Los Angelena, I knew of and have seen this place in person–but only from the outside. Going inside the heart of Skid Row was, therefore, a surreal experience. I felt exposed and, admittedly, scared. When we got inside the Hippie Kitchen, I felt a sense of relief–no longer would I have to stand outside surrounded by the marginalized and unrepresented as the Kitchen’s four walls became my temporary refuge. I felt weird and I felt wrong.

Going inside the heart of Skid Row was, therefore, a surreal experience. I felt exposed and, admittedly, scared. When we got inside the Hippie Kitchen, I felt a sense of relief–no longer would I have to stand outside surrounded by the marginalized and unrepresented as the Kitchen’s four walls became my temporary refuge.

Isabella Primavera ‘21.5, MAlt LA Participant

As we rotated jobs once the Hippie Kitchen opened, I found myself serving salad to those experiencing homelessness. At this station, I distinctly remember one moment: One of the regular volunteers asked a regular patron where his wife was. He answered: “She’s in our tent today since she’s not feeling well.” That response hit me hard. In my everyday life, the “tent” would be substituted by “home” or “room,” sturdier and more personal spaces, places that are supposed to provide a comfortable shield from the outside. Hearing this man’s response, I felt a sense of shame. It was shame for being able to find comfort in going back to a comfortable house–with a bed, a heater, running water, a warm blanket–while my counterparts lived in their tents.

A billboard in Downtown LA stating “Homeless Republic,” depicting the California flag’s bear as a man outside of his tent– his home.

Before we started our shifts, we came upon the volunteers praying in a circle, holding hands. When they saw us (Middlebury students standing outside the kitchen), they opened up the circle and invited us join the prayer. The prayer, I faintly recall, was a prayer by St. Vincent de Paul–a priest who has dedicated his life to serving the poor. The prayer talked of our duties to the poor–that it is our duty to help them and even when they disrespect us, we must treat them with more kindness. I deeply respect all of the volunteers; their belief in the word of God drives their selflessness in serving the community in Skid Row. I respect those experiencing homelessness as well. Despite their situations, some of them come to the Hippie Kitchen filled with hope and gratitude. It is another day that they are alive and another day that they can eat and for that they are thankful. 

A wall in the Hippie Kitchen says “Make Beans, Not War.” The Hippie Kitchen, whose official name is actually Lost Angeles Catholic Worker’s “Hospitality Kitchen,” makes food (including beans) three times a week for those who need it.

There is so much that we did on this trip–so much learning, engagement, reflection–that one blog post would not be enough to talk about all of it. I’ve highlighted these two days of the trip because they contained the most impactful moments for me. While the first experience shows the direct connection between climate change and religion I experienced, the second experience shows that solving the climate crisis cannot stand in isolation from creating broader social justice. Climate change is a social justice issue. For how can the marginalized and underrepresented worry about the environment when everyday they have to worry about satisfying their most basic needs–food and shelter? This trip has made me realize that climate change is not just this abstract, global problem but a systemic problem–those who are not in the top 5% wealthiest parts of the population are the ones who experience most of climate change’s effects, but those with the most wealth are responsible for creating and maintaining most of the systems of dependence on, and actual emissions of, fossil fuels and greenhouse gasses that are causing the problem in the first place. The marginalized hold some of the fewest choices for taking personal action, too. People who need jobs must take the jobs available, even if they are in places like oil refineries. Those experiencing homelessness use single-use plastic because they don’t have access to sturdier containers. All of these complex problems are part of climate change.

 Climate change is a social justice issue. For how can the marginalized and underrepresented worry about the environment when everyday they have to worry about satisfying their most basic needs–food and shelter?

Isabella Primavera ‘21.5, MAlt LA Participant

Although these issues seem so big and unsolvable–believe me, I was feeling hopeless for a while–the communities that we have seen in action are all doing their part to try to fix the system from the ground-up. Faith communities as well as normal neighborhoods are all working with the people in their communities to tackle the climate crises–the Metropolitan Church of Christ and the Hippie Kitchen are just two of these examples. Because of these groups, I have hope that we can work together to change the world for the better. 

Meet Alumni with Careers in Data Analytics – Friday, March 6

What is the hottest profession to emerge within the last decade?  Data Analytics

We know what you’re thinking, “I’m not a math major so I cannot be involved in this field.” Guess again! As it turns out data analytics involves vast amounts of quantitative and qualitative information, holding insights, offering all curious majors a variety of interesting career options. This UpNext career program will explore a wide variety of career roles across industries with the help of a number of alumni, discussing their career pathway experiences.

Schedule of Events:

Friday, March 6 – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Résumé Review Office Hours (Adirondack House) – If you are interested in a career utilizing data analytics, don’t miss this chance to get valuable feedback on your résumé from Middlebury alumni currently employed in various roles using data analytics. Résumé reviews are 20-minute private, one-on-one conversations.

Friday, March 6 – 12:30-1:30 p.m.

Careers in Data Analytics for Liberal Arts – Panel Discussion (MBH 220) – When it comes to data analytics, it is everywhere and used in a variety of industries and career roles. The panelists will talk about this growing variety, its appropriateness for many different majors, and how the liberal arts support careers in this space. Hear from a panel of Middlebury alumni with a variety of backgrounds who now have careers across a wide spectrum utilizing data analytics. Moderated by: Alex Lyford, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Middlebury

  • Christopher Whitely ’95 – (Literary Studies) Senior Director, Research and Data, Comcast/Freewheel
  • Neil K. Bergquist ’01 – (French, Geography) Senior Qualitative Research Consultant, IPSOS UU
  • Peter Lubans ’06 – (Mathematics, Computer Science) Head of Research & Development, Qsemble Capital Management
  • Stefan Claypool ’09 – (Chinese, Economics) Senior Product Manager, PayPal
  • Kelsey E. Hoekstra ’17 – (Mathematics) Client Journey Analyst, Vanguard

Friday, March 6 – 1:45-5:30 p.m.

Experienced professionals currently employed by a variety of organizations will host multiple workshops (listed below) designed to set you up for success as you explore career possibilities, apply for positions, interview, and begin your own career. Each workshop is 45 minutes.  Attend them all or select only the ones most relevant to you; there will be short breaks between each session to allow you to come and go.

View the workshop schedule and alumni bios here.

Schedule your 1:1 chat to learn about Careers in Language and Intercultural Competence!

Find out more about the opportunities for careers in language and intercultural competence, and the possibilities for gaining marketable skills in these fields at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. Dr. Thor Sawin, who teaches linguistics, language education, and intercultural competence courses, will share and answer any questions about gaining skills either in a Masters program or a study away semester as language teachers, curriculum designers, localizers, translators and interpreters, language product and assessment designers, or intercultural competence consultants.  

Click here to schedule your 1:1 chat on Thursday, February 27!